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    7 courses found for the selected term.
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    If you searched only by department and term, cross-listed courses will be displayed at the bottom of the list.


  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 71
    Grade Mode: Satisfactory/UnsatisfactoryWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: W 7:00 PM-8:30 PM / SEELYE 106

    This course introduces students to issues raised by and in the emerging interdisciplinary field of queer studies. Through a series of lectures by Smith faculty members and invited guests, students learn about subject areas, methodological issues and resources in queer studies. May not be repeated for credit. Graded S/U only. {H}{L}{S}
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 31
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W F 11:00 AM-12:10 PM / SEELYE 109

    An introduction to the interdisciplinary field of the study of women and gender through a critical examination of feminist histories, issues and practices. Focus on the U.S. with some attention to the global context. Primarily for first- and second-year students. {H}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    ENV Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 28
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 1:00 PM-2:20 PM / SEELYE 201

    An introduction to the interdisciplinary field of the study of women and gender through a critical examination of feminist histories, issues and practices. Focus on the U.S. with some attention to the global context. Primarily for first- and second-year students. {H}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    ENV Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 19
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 9:00 AM-10:20 AM / SEELYE 105

    This course explores lesbian, queer and bisexual communities, cultures and activism as preparation for oral history work. While becoming familiar with the existing narratives about lesbian/queer lives, students are introduced to the method of oral history as a key documentation strategy in the production of marginalized histories. Our texts include secondary literature on 20th-century queer cultures and communities, oral history theory and methodology, and primary sources from the Sophia Smith Collection (SSC). Students conduct, transcribe, edit and interpret their own interviews for their final project. The oral histories from this course are archived in Smith's Special Collections. Prerequisites: SWG 150 or the equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20. {H}{L}
    Linked Course: No
    HST Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 24
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 1:00 PM-2:20 PM / SEELYE 206

    This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of reproductive health, rights and justice in the United States, examining history, activism, law, policy, and public discourses related to reproduction. A central framework for analysis is how gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, disability and nationality intersect to shape people’s experiences of reproductive oppression and their resistance strategies. Topics include eugenics and the birth control movement; the reproductive rights and justice movements; U.S. population control policies; criminalization of pregnant people; fetal personhood and birth parents’ citizenship; the medicalization of reproduction; reproductive technologies; the influence of disability, incarceration and poverty on pregnancy and parenting; the anti-abortion movement; and reproductive coercion and violence. Prerequisite SWG 150 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): SWG 150
    PPL Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 25
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 1:10 PM-2:30 PM / SEELYE 312

    In this course we will consider the manner in which norms of gender and sexuality are reflected, reinforced, and challenged in popular culture. We use theories of knowledge production, representation, and meaning-making to support our analysis of the relationship between discourse and power; our engagement with these theoretical texts helps us track this dynamic as it emerges in popular culture. Key queer theoretical concepts provide a framework for examining how the production gender and sexuality impacts cultural production. Through our critical engagement with a selection of films, music, television, visual art, and digital media we will discuss mainstream conventions and the feminist, queer, and queer of color interventions that enliven the landscape of popular culture with which we contend in everyday life. Prerequisite: SWG 150 or permission of the instructor.  {A}{S}
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 9
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor PermissionReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T 1:00 PM-4:00 PM / SEELYE 308

    This course examines visual and literary documentations of queer life by reading memoirs and screening short and feature length documentary films. We consider the power and value of this archive while we examine the politics of visibility as it is impacted by race, class, and gender. We attend to the expansiveness of what we mean by “queer” and “the archive” as we engage with theories of knowledge production, performativity, gender, and sexuality. Over the course of the semester students will propose, plan, write, and revise a substantial research paper based on their research interests and the material covered in class. Prerequisites: SWG 150 and one additional SWG course. Enrollment limit of 12. {A}{L}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to juniors and seniors
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  • 29 cross listed courses found for the selected term.


  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 10
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 9:00 AM-10:20 AM / HILLYR L19

    This course examines historical, critical and theoretical perspectives on the development of Black feminist theory/praxis. The course draws from the 19th century to the present, but focuses on the contemporary Black feminist intellectual tradition that achieved notoriety in the 1970s and initiated a global debate on “Western” and global feminisms. Central to our exploration is the analysis of the intersectional relationship between theory and practice, and of race, to gender and class. We conclude the course with the exploration of various expressions of contemporary Black feminist thought around the globe as a way of broadening our knowledge of feminist theory. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 17
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 1:10 PM-2:30 PM / HATFLD 107

    In this course we examine contemporary African-American families from both a sociocultural and socioeconomic perspective. We explore the issues facing African-American families as a consequence of the intersecting of race, class and gender categories of America. The aim of this course is to broaden the student’s knowledge of the internal dynamics and diversity of African-American family life and to foster a greater understanding of the internal strengths as well as the vulnerabilities of the many varieties of African-American families. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 8
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 9:00 AM-10:20 AM / HATFLD 107

    This interdisciplinary colloquial course explores the historical and theoretical perspectives of African American women from the time of slavery to the post-civil rights era. A central concern of the course is the examination of how black women shaped and were shaped by the intersectionality of race, gender and sexuality in American culture. Not open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 25. {H}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years
    HST Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 6
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor PermissionReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T 1:00 PM-2:50 PM / MCCONN 403

    Topics course. Considering the myth of a “racial democracy”, how have black Brazilian artists constructed memory and identity through their artistic production? How do the politics of race, gender, class, sexuality, and national identity shape Afro-Brazilian cultural (con)texts? This course explores a multi-genre selection of Afro- Brazilian literary texts from the 20th and 21st centuries to examine the connections between cultural production and identity politics. Our study will also consider other types of Afro-Brazilian artistic expressions such as music, performance, and visual culture. This course also provides an opportunity for students to develop comparative inquiries on the black diasporic experience. {H}{S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    LAS Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 39
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 10:30 AM-11:50 AM / SEELYE 201

    An introduction to the methods and concerns of American studies. We draw on literature, painting, architecture, landscape design, social and cultural criticism, and popular culture to explore such topics as responses to economic change, ideas of nature and culture, America’s relationship to Europe, the question of race, the roles of women, family structure, social class and urban experience. {H}{L}
    Linked Course: No
    LSS Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 23
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 1:10 PM-2:30 PM / SAGE 15

    Topics course. Normally offered each academic year. Since the 1950s rock ’n’ roll and other forms of youth-oriented popular music in the U.S. have embodied rebellion. Yet the rebellion that rock and other popular music styles like rap have offered has often been more available to men than women. Similarly, the sexual liberation associated with popular music in the rock and rap eras has been far more open to “straight” desires over “queer.” This course examines how popular music from the 1950s to the present has been shaped by gender and sexuality, and the extent to which the music and its associated cultural practices have allowed artists and audiences to challenge gender and sexual norms, or alternately have served to reinforce those norms albeit with loud guitars and a heavy beat. Enrollment limited to 20. {A}{H}
    Linked Course: No
    MUS Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 17
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 1:00 PM-2:20 PM / SEELYE 101

    From butt-kicking warriors like Imperator Furiosa, to state leaders like New York governor David Paterson and former president FDR, to ultra-glamorous models like Jillian Mercado and Nyle DiMarco, images of and persons with disabilities have shaped the discourse of American popular culture. Though popular literary genres have long framed disability as tragic or pitiable, disabled writers have successfully appropriated popular, commercial styles to leverage critiques against dominant conceptions of disability. The purpose of this course is to investigate what arguments these popular texts make, whether implicitly or explicitly, about disability. Enrollment limit of 20.  {H}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 7
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 10:30 AM-11:50 AM / DEWEY 104

    This course introduces students to the culture, politics and everyday life of South Asia. Topics covered include religion, community, nation, caste, gender and development, as well as some of the key conceptual problems in the study of South Asia, such as the colonial construction of social scientific knowledge, and debates over “tradition” and “modernity.” In this way, we address both the varieties in lived experience in the subcontinent and the key scholarly, popular and political debates that have constituted the terms through which we understand South Asian culture. Along with ethnographies, we study and discuss novels, historical analysis, primary historical texts and popular (Bollywood) and documentary film. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    SAS Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 24
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 9:00 AM-10:20 AM / HILLYR 103

    This course examines histories of photography from the medium’s invention around 1839 to its use by artists and non-artists today. In particular, we will focus on race, gender, and representation, exploring how photography has been deployed both as a tool of oppression and of resistance. Throughout, students will be introduced to the rich theoretical literature on the medium as well as the historical circumstances of its production. Some of the topics we will consider are the mutual construction of photography and anthropology, the “queer camera,” the use of photography in social movements for racial justice, and the gaze, self-fashioning, and social media. Group B.  {A}{H}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 15
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 3:00 PM-4:50 PM / HILLYR 103

    Students may take up to two semesters of ARH 291, “Topics in Art History,” as long as the topics are different. This course investigates feminist art practices in fine art, craft, and social movement imagery of the United States of America from 1900 to the present. We will approach our subject with an intersectional lens, meaning we will consider histories of gender as they are intertwined with other forms of identity such as race, class, sexuality, ability, and so on. The course culminates in an original research project on an object selected from collections of feminist art recently gifted to the Smith College Museum of Art. (E) {A}{H}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 16
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 3:00 PM-4:50 PM / SEELYE 105

    Some cultures give the murdering mother a central place in myth and literature while others treat the subject as taboo. How is such a woman depicted—as monster, lunatic, victim, savior? What do the motives attributed to her reveal about a society’s assumptions and values? What difference does it make if the author is a woman? We focus on literary texts but also consider representations in other media, especially cinema. Authors to be studied include Euripides, Seneca, Ovid, Anouilh, Christa Wolff, Christopher Durang, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison and others. {L}
    Linked Course: No
    CLS Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 12
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 1:10 PM-2:30 PM / HATFLD 203

    This course focuses on the writings of Japanese women from the 10th century until the present. We examine the foundations of Japan’s literary tradition represented by such early works as Murasaki Shikibu’s Tale of Genji and Sei Shonagon’s Pillow Book. We then move to the late 19th century to consider the first modern examples of Japanese women’s writing. How does the existence of a “feminine literary tradition” in pre-modern Japan influence the writing of women during the modern period? How do these texts reflect, resist and reconfigure conventional representations of gender? We explore the possibilities and limits of the articulation of feminine and feminist subjectivities, as well as investigate the production of such categories as “race,” class and sexuality in relation to gender and to each other. Taught in English, with no knowledge of Japanese required. {L}
    Linked Course: No
    EAS Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 24
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 1:00 PM-2:20 PM / SEELYE 102

    Members of the Bloomsbury movement led non-normative (what many now call queer) lives. The complexity and openness of their relationships characterized not only the lives but also the major works of fiction, art, design, and critical writings its members produced. “Sex permeated our conversation,” Woolf recalls, and in Bloomsbury and Sexuality we’ll explore the far-reaching consequences of this ostensible removal of discursive, social, and sexual inhibition in the spheres of literature, art, and social sciences. The course will draw from the art of Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant, the writings of E. M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, Radclyffe Hall, Lytton Strachey, John Maynard Keynes and others, along with contemporary queer theory. {L}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 24
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: M W 2:40 PM-4:00 PM / HILLYR 103

    An estimated 63% of U.S. households have members who play video games regularly, and game sales routinely exceed film box office figures. As this medium grows in cultural power, it is increasingly important to think about how games make meaning. This course serves as an introduction to Game Studies, equipping students with the vocabulary to analyze video games, surveying the medium’s genres, and sampling this scholarly discipline’s most influential theoretical writing. The particular focus, though, is on the ideology operating beneath the surface of these popular entertainment objects and on the ways in which video games enter political discourse. Enrollment limit of 30. {A}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 10
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W F 11:00 AM-12:10 PM / SEELYE 107

    Topics course. A gateway to more advanced courses. These colloquia develop skills in expository writing and critical thinking in French. Materials include novels, films, essays and cultural documents. Students may receive credit for only one section of 230. Enrollment limited to 18. Basis for the major. Prerequisite: 220, or permission of the instructor. How have French stores and shopping practices evolved since the grand opening of Le Bon Marché in 1869? In what ways have megastores and e-commerce influenced French "culture"? This course examines representations of mass consumption in literature, the press, history, and analyses of French popular and bourgeois traditions, paying particular attention to the role of women in the transactions and development of culture. {F}{L}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 16
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 10:30 AM-11:50 AM / HATFLD 204

    Topics course. A gateway to more advanced courses. These colloquia develop skills in expository writing and critical thinking in French. Materials include novels, films, essays and cultural documents. Students may receive credit for only one section of 230. Enrollment limited to 18. Basis for the major. Prerequisite: 220, or permission of the instructor. An introduction to works by contemporary women writers from Francophone Africa and the Caribbean. Topics studied include colonialism, exile, motherhood and intersections between class and gender. Our study of these works and of the French language is informed by attention to the historical, political and cultural circumstances of writing as a woman in a former French colony. Texts include works by Mariama Bâ, Maryse Condé, Yamina Benguigui and Marie-Célie Agnant. {F}{L}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 45
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor PermissionReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 1:10 PM-2:30 PM / MCCONN B15

    This course explores the practical meaning of the term “development” and its impact on a range of global topics from the problems of poverty and income inequality to the spread of democracy, environmental degradation, urbanization and gender empowerment. We examine existing theories of economic development and consider how state governments, international donors and NGOs interact to craft development policy. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    AFS Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 6
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 9:00 AM-10:20 AM / SEELYE 211

    What is democracy? We begin with readings of Aristotle, Rousseau and Mill to introduce some issues associated with the ideal of democratic self-government: participation, equality, majority rule vs. minority rights, the common good, pluralism, community. Readings include selections from liberal, radical, socialist, libertarian, multiculturalist and feminist political thought. Not open to first-year students. {S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years
    SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 12
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 10:30 AM-11:50 AM / WRIGHT 238

    Topics course. This course explores the intimate relationship between gender and imperialism from U.S. independence to the present. From colonial visions of virgin lands to nuclear testing on the Bikini atoll, Americans for a long time understood empire through the lens of gender. Among the course’s major themes are indigenous politics, interracial mixing, Atlantic slavery, capitalism, migration, and imperialism in the Pacific. Throughout our discussions, we will pay special attention to the ways in which everyday people colluded and collided with U.S. imperialism. (E) {H}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 11
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T 1:00 PM-2:50 PM / HILLYR L19

    Topics course. Despite the particular degradation, violence and despair of enslavement in the United States, African American men and women built families, traditions and a legacy of resistance. Using the WPA interviews—part of the New Deal Federal Writers Project of the 1930s—this course looks at the historical memory of former slaves by reading and listening to their own words. How did 70- through 90-year-old former slaves remember their childhoods and young adulthoods during slavery? And how do scholars make sense of these interviews given they were conducted when Jim Crow segregation was at its pinnacle? The course examines the WPA interviews as historical sources by studying scholarship that relies heavily on them. Most importantly, students explore debates that swirl around the interviews and challenge their validity on multiple fronts, even as they remain the richest sources of African American oral history regarding slavery. Students write an original research paper using the WPA interviews a {H}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to juniors and seniors
    SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 59
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 9:00 AM-10:20 AM / STODRD G2

    A study of topics and issues relating to women’s health, including menstrual cycle, contraception, sexually transmitted infections, abortion, mental health, nutrition, osteoporosis, the media’s representation of women and gender bias in health care. Social, cultural, ethical and political issues are considered, as well as an international perspective. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    ESS Crosslist, PPL Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 10
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor PermissionReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 10:30 AM-11:50 AM / HATFLD 105

    Topics course. This course provides an in-depth look at the changing role of women in Italian society. Authors studied include Natalia Ginzburg, Elsa Morante, Dacia Maraini and Elena Ferrante. A portion of the course is dedicated to the new multicultural and multiethnic Italian reality with a selection of texts written during the last 20 years by contemporary women immigrants. Limited enrollment. Permission of the instructor required. Conducted in Italian. {F}{L}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 16
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor PermissionReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T 1:00 PM-2:50 PM / BASS 211

    This seminar focuses on people’s motivations to participate in political activism, especially activism around social issues. Readings include theoretical and empirical work from political psychology paired with personal accounts of activists. Weconsider accounts of some large-scale liberal and conservative social movements in the United States. Students conduct an in-depth analysis of an activists oral history obtained from the Voices of Feminism archive of the Sophia Smith collection. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. {S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 9
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T 1:00 PM-4:00 PM / HATFLD 203

    Explores how the rabbis of the Talmud concerned themselves with bodies particularly in relation to bioethical issues surrounding conception, life, and death. Focuses on the conceptualizations of gender and health in rabbinic literature as well as on questions of power dynamics in Jewish law as it pertains to women specifically. {H}{L}
    Linked Course: No
    JUD Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 35
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 11
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W F 11:00 AM-12:10 PM / SEELYE 308

    This course provides an in-depth examination of major sociological theories of collective action and social movements. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of social movement dynamics including recruitment and mobilization, strategies and tactic, and movement outcomes. The empirical emphasis is on modern American social movements including student protest, feminist, civil rights and sexual identity movements. Prerequisite: SOC 101.Enrollment limited to 35. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 35
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 26
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 1:00 PM-2:50 PM / SEELYE 301

    This course engages with the various dimensions of globalization through the lens of gender, race and class relations. We study how gender and race intersect in global manufacturing and supply chains as well as in the transnational politics of representation and access in global media, culture, consumption, fashion, food, water, war and dissenting voices. Prerequisite: SOC 101. Enrollment limited to 35. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): SOC 101
    SAS Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 35
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 33
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 2:40 PM-4:00 PM / SEELYE 312

    This course examines sexuality from a sociological perspective, focusing on how sexuality is constructed by and structures major social institutions. We examine the social construction of individual and collective identities, norms and behaviors, discourses, institutional regulation, and the place of sexuality in the state, education, science and other institutions, and social movements. Consideration of gender, race, class, time and place are integrated throughout. Topics include the social construction of sexual desire and practice, sexuality and labor, reproduction, science, technology, sexuality and the state, sexuality education, globalization, commodification, and social movements for sexual purity, sexual freedom and against sexual violence. Enrollment limited to 35. Prerequisite: SOC 101. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): SOC 101
    SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 13
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor PermissionReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T 1:00 PM-2:50 PM / HATFLD 204

    Topics course. This course can be repeated once for credit with a different topic. This class focuses on challenges to and changes in gender and sexuality during conservative time periods. Focusing on the U.S., we will primarily examine the 1980's and the contemporary period as case studies. We will look how political and other institutions affect gender and sexuality, and at social movements addressing gender and sexuality from both the right and the left. We will look at movements including queer, feminist, anti-racist, anti-interventionist movements on the left, and racial supremacist, pro-military intervention, anti-LGBT, and conservative evangelical movements on the right. Theoretical frameworks are drawn from social movements, intersectional feminist and queer theories. {S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 12
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T 3:00 PM-4:50 PM / SEELYE 301

    This 300-level seminar provides an in-depth engagement with global migration. It covers such areas as theories of migration, the significance of global political economy and state policies across the world in shaping migration patterns and immigrant identities. Questions about imperialism, post-colonial conditions, nation-building/national borders, citizenship and the gendered racialization of immigration intersect as critical contexts for our discussions. Prerequisite: SOC 101, a course on global political economy, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. {S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    GSD Crosslist, SAS Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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Smith College reserves the right to make changes to all announcements in the online Smith College Catalog Database, including changes in its course offerings, instructors, requirements for the majors and minors, and degree requirements. Course information contained herein is compiled and updated at regularly scheduled intervals by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty from data submitted by departments and programs. All data listed are as officially and formally approved by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty, the Committee on Academic Priorities and the faculty-at-large.