Skip to main content
Three students hanging art on a gallery wall

The Smith art department embraces the history of art, studio practice and architecture. In all three arenas, we are committed to cultivating visual literacy and to understanding artistic production in different cultures throughout time and in our own media-saturated present.

Art majors have gone on to careers as artists, scholars, architects, landscape architects, art librarians, educators, visual resource specialists, conservators, preservationists, curators and gallerists. They have also become editors, entrepreneurs, lawyers and doctors. Whether they major in the field or take a course or two, students have found that informed visual thinking, no less than the pleasure of aesthetic experience, continues to enrich their lives and their work.

Explore the 2023-24 Art Department Brochure (PDF)

Art News & Updates

Art Stockings: Dialogues on Art, Gender, and Cultural lecture series is pleased to welcome Hilma's Ghost

 A painting collaborative formed between artists Danielle Tegeder and Sharmistha Ray, for a virtual artist's talk on Thursday February 29th @ 4:15-5:15 in Hilyer 203. As a collaborative practice, Hilma’s Ghost has conducted experimental pedagogy, transcultural dialogue, and collectivity through the lens of feminism and spirituality to build community and reckon with patriarchal art histories that have excluded women, trans, and nonbinary practitioners. Register here

Requirements & Courses

Goals for Majors in Art

All graduating art majors and minors will:
  • develop familiarity with original works of art and/or architecture and with research tools appropriate for the discipline, including print scholarship, online databases, and various reference materials; 
  • communicate their ideas effectively in written, oral and (as appropriate) material form, including public presentations that rely upon the display of visual images or artwork;
  • engage a range of disciplines in their work, in the spirit of a liberal arts education.
Art studio and architecture majors and minors will:
  • demonstrate fluency in practices or techniques in the current field of practice for at least one medium (e.g, painting, installation, photography, digital media); 
  • demonstrate proficiency in an extensive and pertinent vocabulary for describing their own work and the art historical antecedents with which it shares relationships; 
  • demonstrate familiarity with professional practices and global perspectives within the cultural landscape of contemporary art;

Assessment (majors and minors): Students will be assessed through periodic faculty and peer critiques of their work and reviews of their written and oral abilities.

Assessment (majors only): Students will create a body of work for final exhibition that results from deep engagement in the process of making and demonstrates an awareness of the contemporary and historical context in which the work exists. This work will be evaluated through peer, faculty, and external critique. 

Students will also complete the major with a professional-level, documented portfolio of their work, including both visual and written materials.

Art history majors and minors will:
  • learn to read original objects, architectural settings, and written scholarship analytically and synthetically;
  • demonstrate familiarity with the different ways that spaces, monuments, and objects have intersected with lived and imagined experiences throughout history and the world over;
  • demonstrate expertise in self-directed research, including fluency with a range of methodologies and debates across the discipline.

Assessment: Students will be assessed in classes, through faculty reviews of their written and oral abilities.

Students will also complete a capstone research seminar that results in a sustained piece of original research, presented in oral form and a paper of ca. 15 pages, to be evaluated by the faculty.

Art History Major

Courses in the history of art are divided into areas that reflect breadth in terms of both geography and chronology. 

Requirements

Ten courses

  1. As a gateway to the major, students may take either ARH 110: Art and Its Histories, normally completed by the sophomore year, or a First Year Seminar taught by an art history faculty member.
  2. One course in studio art
  3. ARH 190: Art History: Theory, Methods, Debates, normally taken by the junior year.
  4. Six courses in the history of art and architecture at the 200 and 300 levels.
    • Students are expected to take a mix of lectures, colloquia and seminars, sequenced in consultation with the major adviser.
    • These courses should address a range of methodologies, time periods and geographies (e.g. Asia, Europe, North America, Latin America, Africa, etc.).
    • For different methodological approaches, students should take courses with a range of faculty members.
    • The six courses should include two that focus on material created before 1850. Note that there can be overlap, so for instance a course on Buddhist grottoes could serve as both a class on material before 1850 and on Asia.
    • In consultation with the adviser, these six courses may include one from a related discipline or a second studio course.
  5. ARH 390: Art History Capstone, normally taken in the senior year.
  • Students entering Smith with a 5 on the AP art history exam may choose to be exempted from ARH 110, replacing it with another art history course at the 200 level or above.
  • No course counting toward the fulfillment of the major or minor may be taken for an S/U grade.*
  • Courses associated with a concentration (such as IDP, MUX, etc.) cannot be counted toward the completion of the art major.

*In response to unprecedented circumstances, the Department of Art is allowing up to two Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) courses from Academic Year 2020–21 to count towards the major.

Students entering Smith College in the fall 2023 semester (or after) are subject to the above requirements.  All others have the option of following this set of requirements, or the one in effect when they enrolled in the college or declared their major.

Studio Art Major

Requirements

Eleven 4-credit courses

  1. One 100-level studio art course: ARS 162, ARS 163 or ARS 172 (Note that certain upper-level courses indicate specific 100-level course prerequisites.)
  2. ARH 110: Art and Its Histories
  3. One course with contemporary emphasis, relating to art history, visual studies or film and media studies, to be chosen in consultation with adviser.
  4. One additional art history course at the 200 level or 300 level
  5. Five additional 4-credit studio art courses
    • One course may be at the 100 level
    • Students may work across media areas but must consult with their adviser to take a series of courses (usually three) to reach the advanced level in at least one of the following. Each area is sequenced differently but will require at least one 300-level course.
      • drawing
      • digital media
      • graphic arts (printmaking or typography)
      • installation
      • painting
      • photography
      • sculpture
  6. ARS 385
  7. ARS 399
  • Students who complete their degree requirements in the fall semester should take ARS 399 in their junior year. All other students should take ARS 385 and ARS 399 in their senior year.
  • Students entering Smith with a 5 on the AP art history exam may choose to be exempted from ARH 110, replacing it with another art history course at the 200 level or above.
  • No course counting toward the fulfillment of the major or minor may be taken for an S/U grade.*
  • Courses associated with a concentration (such as IDP, MUX, etc.) cannot be counted toward the completion of the art major.

*In response to unprecedented circumstances, the Department of Art is allowing up to two Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) courses from Academic Year 2020–21 to count towards the major.

Students entering Smith College in the fall 2023 semester (or after) are subject to the above requirements.  All others have the option of following this set of requirements, or the one in effect when they enrolled in the College or declared their major.

Declaring a major in studio art

A student may declare a major in studio art any time after completing the introductory (100-level) studio art requirement and one additional studio art course. Prior to declaration, students must complete a portfolio review, scheduled each semester prior to the advising period. Students who receive a negative evaluation will be encouraged to take an additional studio course or courses and resubmit their portfolio at a subsequent review time. Students who receive a negative evaluation may resubmit their portfolios in subsequent reviews up to and including the last portfolio review available during their sophomore year. These students will be offered suggestions for strengthening their portfolios through additional studio coursework in the same or other media represented in the portfolio. The additional studio courses will count toward fulfilling the major requirements.

Mapping the major in studio art 

Upon receiving a positive portfolio evaluation, a student should select and meet with a studio art adviser to discuss the student’s interests and studio work to date and to select a media from those listed above. The student and adviser may design a sequence of studio courses that draws from several areas of focus.

Architecture and Urbanism Major  

Requirements

Twelve courses 

  1. ARH 110 Art and Its Histories
  2. One 100-level studio art course: ARS 162, ARS 163 or ARS 172
  3. Two introductory architectural design studio courses: ARS 280 and ARS 281
  4. One advanced architectural design studio course: ARS 380 or ARS 381
  5. One studio art course in another medium
  6. Three 200-level or 300-level art history courses focusing on the built environment
    1. One course with a focus on pre-1850
    2. One course with a focus on post-1850
    3. One elective
  7. Two architecture-focused electives selected with guidance from the major adviser
  8. One art history research-focused seminar with final paper focusing on the built environment, to be taken at Smith

Students entering Smith College in the fall 2023 semester (or after) are subject to the above requirements.  All others have the option of following this set of requirements, or the one in effect when they enrolled in the college or declared their major.

It is recommended that a student contemplating application to a graduate program in architecture take at least one semester of physics and at least one semester of calculus, after consultation with the student’s major adviser. 

Honors

Requirements and Presentations

All candidates will present their work to the department, in a public presentation, in late April or early May. Guidelines and further details can be found on the department website. Students planning to major or to do honors work in art will find it valuable to take courses in literature, philosophy, religion and history in the first two years. A reading knowledge of foreign languages is useful for historical courses. Courses may require one or more trips to Boston, New York or other places in the vicinity to study original works of art. 

Art History Minor

Designed for students who, although they major in another department, wish to also focus on the history of art. With the assistance of their advisers, students may construct their minor to be as specific or comprehensive as they desire within the skeletal structure of the requirements.

Requirements

Six courses

  1. As a gateway to the minor, students make take either ARH 110: Art and Its Histories, normally completed by the sophomore year, or a First Year Seminar taught by an art history faculty member
  2. ARH 190: Art History: Theory, Methods, Debates
  3. Four courses in the history of art and architecture:
  • Students are expected to take a mix of courses sequenced in consultation with their adviser.
  • These courses should address a range of methodologies, time periods, and geographies (e.g. Asia, Europe, North America, Latin America, Africa, etc.).
  • For different methodological approaches, students should take courses with a range of faculty members.
  • The four courses include one that focuses on material created before 1850. Note that there can be overlap, so for instance a class on Buddhist grottoes could serve as both a class on material before 1850 and on Asia.
  • The four courses should include two at the 290 level and above.
  • The four courses may include one studio art course.

Students entering Smith College in the fall 2023 semester (or after) are subject to the above requirements.  All others have the option of following this set of requirements, or the one in effect when they enrolled in the college or declared their minor.

Studio Art Minor

Designed for students who wish to focus on studio art, although they are majors in another department. With the assistance of a minor adviser, a student may construct a minor with primary emphasis on one area of studio art or may design a minor that draws from several areas of concentration.

Requirements

Six 4-credit courses

  1. ARS 162ARS 163 or ARS 172 
  2. Three courses at the 200 level
  3. One course at the 300 level
  4. One elective in studio art

Architecture and Urbanism Minor

Designed for students who wish to focus on architecture, although they are majors in another department. This minor seeks to introduce students to the history, design and representation of the built environment.

Requirements 

Six courses

  1. ARS 162ARS 163 or ARS 172 
  2. ARS 280 or LSS 250
  3. ARS 281 or LSS 255
  4. Two art history courses at the 200 level or 300 level focusing on the built environment
    1. one course with a focus on pre-1850
    2. one course with a focus on post-1850
  5. ARH 110

Graphic Arts Minor

Graphic arts seeks to draw together the department’s studio and history offerings in printmaking and typography into a cohesive unit.

Requirements 

Six courses

  1. ARS 163
  2. ARH 247 or a topic of ARS 268
  3. Three courses in studio art from this list: ARS 269, ARS 272, ARS 275, ARS 372 or ARS 376
  4. ARS 372, ARS 376 or a continuation of one medium

Course Information

The following studio courses are repeatable with different course content and instructor, for a maximum of 8 credits: ARS 264, topics of ARS 268, ARS 362ARS 362
ARS 363
ARS 364
, topics ARS 366, ARS 372
ARS 374
ARS 376
ARS 383
, topics of ARS 384.

Art history ARH 290 topics are repeatable with different course content for a maximum of 16 credits.

Advanced 200-level Colloquia Including topics of ARH 290, address methodological and theoretical questions as well as the histories of particular cultures, objects and moments. All of these colloquia involve sustained discussion and independent research, and require at least one 200-level art history course as a prerequisite. Enrollments limited to 18.

Seminars require advanced-level research. Students are expected to bring to class a solid and relevant background in the general field and period of study. All seminars require an oral presentation and a research paper. Enrollments limited to 12.

Studio Courses Core studio materials (such as ink, plaster or chemicals) are supplied to students of studio courses. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. The department reserves the right to retain examples of work done in studio courses. All studio courses require extensive work beyond the scheduled class hours. Please note that all studio art courses have limited enrollments.

Courses

ARH 110 Art and Its Histories (4 Credits)

This course explores how art and architecture have profoundly shaped visual experiences and shifting understandings of the past and present. Featuring different case studies, each section includes work with original objects, site visits and writings about art. Unifying themes include: (1) materials, techniques and the patterns deployed to create space; (2) the design, function and symbolism of images and monuments; (3) artistic production and its relation to individual and institutional patronage, religion, politics and aesthetics; (4) issues turning on artists’ fame versus anonymity and uniqueness versus reproducibility; and (5) cross-cultural exchanges. Enrollment limited to 25. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring

ARH 190 Colloquium: Art History: Theories, Methods, Debates (4 Credits)

The meanings ascribed to art and architecture from any culture or period turn upon the interpreter’s preoccupations and methods. This colloquium examines contemporary debates within the discipline, locating them within the field’s own history. The class asks what kinds of knowledge historians of art and architecture produce and legitimize? What kinds of questions do they ask, what means do they use to answer them? Considering art and architectural history as a living field, the focus falls on recent scholarship, with an eye to the dynamic ways in which it builds on and/or departs from the history of the discipline. Enrollment limited to 18. Prerequisites: ARH 110 or a first-year seminar taught by a member of the department. {A}

Fall, Annually

ARH 200 China in Expansion (4 Credits)

During the formative periods when the local and global forces simultaneously took actions in shaping Chinese civilization, the functions of images and objects, the approaches to things and the discourses around art underwent significant shifts, not only responding to but also mapping out the "Chinese-ness" in visual and material culture. This course of early Chinese art investigates diverse media bronze vessels, sculptures, murals, textiles, architecture and other visual and material forms in relation to political and military conquest, cross-cultural exchange, the dissemination of ordinary practices and the formation of identities. Key terms/issues for the course will include expansion, connection and materiality. Counts for ARU. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Alternate Years

ARH 201/ POR 201 Brazilian Art Inside and Out (4 Credits)

Offered as POR 201 and ARH 201. This course serves as an introduction in English to contemporary and modern Brazilian art. Course materials and class discussions address such topics as public vs. private art spaces, national vs. global identities, the role of art as agency for social change and as site of memory, activism, resistance and transformation. {A}

Fall, Variable

ARH 204 Inkas, Aztecs and Their Ancestors (4 Credits)

What is antiquity in the Americas? To explore this question, this class focuses upon visual cultures and urban settings from across the Americas. Emphasis rests upon recent research especially about the Inka, the Aztec, and their ancestors, but we will also study current debates in art history and archaeology. Among the themes we will discuss: sacrifice and rulership, representations of human and deified beings, the symbolic and economic meanings of materials and the ethics of excavation and museum display. Case studies include architectural complexes, textiles, ceramics and sculpted works from Peru, Mexico, the Caribbean and the U.S. Southwest. Counts for ARU. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 207 Translating New Worlds (4 Credits)

In this class we ask how travel to and through the New World was imagined, described and lived by Indigenous residents as well as those who came to the Americas from across the Atlantic and the Pacific oceans. Our focus rests upon the ways in which geographies, anthropologies, material objects, and pictorial and written records shaped colonial ambitions and experiences. Among the objects we will consider: books and painted images, dyes and metals, feathers, and urban buildings. Case studies will be drawn from across the Americas, including Canada, Mexico, Ecuador, Haiti, and the United States. We will also discuss contemporary cultural practices that seek to explain, interpret, and redress colonial encounters and settlements in the Americas. Group A, Counts for ARU. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 212 Ancient Cities and Sanctuaries (4 Credits)

This course explores many different aspects of life in the cities and sanctuaries of the ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece, Etruria and Rome. Recurrent themes include urbanism, landscapes and patterns of worship, including initiation, sacrifice and pilgrimage. The class probes how modern notions of the secular and the sacred influence interpretation and how sometimes the seemingly most anomalous features of the worship of Isis or of the juxtaposition of commercial and domestic space within a city can potentially prove to be the most revealing about life in another place and time. Counts for ARU. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 216 The Art and Architecture of the Ancient Roman World (4 Credits)

From North Africa to Gaul, from the Pillars of Hercules (Straits of Gibraltar) to Asia Minor, the interrelationships of art and power in the visual culture of the ethnically diverse Roman empire, from the first century B.C.E. through the fourth century C.E., are the subject of study. We also examine works of art from later periods as well as literature and film that structure our perception of the Roman world. Counts for ARU. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 217/ CLS 217 Greek Art and Archaeology (4 Credits)

Offered as CLS 217 and ARH 217. This course is a contextual examination of the art and architecture of Ancient Greece, from the end of the Bronze Age through the domination of Greece by Rome (ca. 1100-168 BCE) and handles an array of settlements, cemeteries and ritual sites. It tracks the development of the Greek city-state and the increasing power of the Greeks in the Mediterranean, culminating in the major diaspora of Greek culture accompanying the campaigns of Alexander the Great and his followers. The course takes a broadly chronological approach, and the question of a unified Greek culture is stressed. Continuing archaeological work is considered. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Alternate Years

ARH 225 Arts of Asia (4 Credits)

This multicultural course introduces students to the visual arts of Asia from the earliest times to the present. In a writing- and speaking-intensive environment, students will develop skills in visual analysis and art historical interpretation. Illustrated class lectures, group discussions, museum visits, and a variety of writing exercises will allow students to explore architecture, sculpture, painting, and other artifacts in relation to the history and culture of such diverse countries as India, China, Cambodia, Korea, and Japan. (E) {A}{H}

Fall, Variable

ARH 228/ MES 228 Islamic Art and Architecture (4 Credits)

Offered as MES 228 and ARH 228. This course surveys Islamic visual art and architecture from the spread of Islam in the seventh-century until the present day, covering the Dome of the Rock and Persian miniatures to French Orientalism and Arab Spring graffiti. Attention is focused upon the relationships between Islamic visual idioms and localized religious, political and socioeconomic circumstances. In particular, lectures and readings examine the vital roles played by theology, royal patronage, gift exchange, trade and workshop practices in the formulation of visual traditions. Direct analysis of Islamic artworks at the Smith museum expand students’ command of critical visual analysis. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 233 Medieval Art on the Move: Pilgrimages and Crusades (4 Credits)

Focusing on buildings and representations created from the 11th through the 13th century, this course explores the intersection between artistic production and the movement, peaceful and bellicose, of people, ideas and objects during the Romanesque and early Gothic periods. Topics include monastic and royal patronage, the pilgrimage church and Crusader castle as specific building types, iconographic programs and their political agendas, and the transnational circulation of artifacts and cross-cultural visual encounters. Counts for ARU. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Alternate Years

ARH 234 The Age of Cathedrals (4 Credits)

Architectural, sculpted and pictorial arts from North of the Alps, c. 1150-1300. Rather than a survey, this course proposes a thematic approach to allow for an in-depth examination of key concerns of the Gothic era, such as the interface between visual creations and new forms of patronage and devotional attitudes, the rise in literacy and secular culture, the development of scientific rationality, or the sustained contact with the Islamic world. Counts for ARU.

Fall, Spring, Alternate Years

ARH 242 Italian Art and Architecture, 1300-1575 (4 Credits)

A contextual study of architecture, painting, printmaking and sculpture, from the central Italian communes of the fourteenth century to villas of Andrea Palladio in the sixteenth. Major artists considered include Giotto, Donatello, Bramante, Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Michelangelo, Titian, Veronese and Vasari. Organizing themes include: materials and techniques; individual artists' training and careers; the relationship of the visual arts to religion, politics, Humanism and a renewed engagement with Roman antiquity. The course explores the overlapping and distinct concerns of the papacy (Rome), of republican governments (Florence, Siena, Venice) and of aristocratic rulers (Ferrara, Mantua, Milan, Naples, Rimini), among other patrons. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 247 Colloquium: The Art and History of the Book (4 Credits)

Will books as material objects disappear in the near future? Or will the book, a remarkably long-lived piece of communication technology, continue to flourish and develop alongside its electronic counterparts? This course surveys the artistry and history of books from the ancient world through medieval manuscripts, hand press books and machine press books, to the digital media of today. Students discover how books were made, read, circulated and used in different eras, and explore the role they have played over time in social, political, scientific and cultural change. The course involves extensive hands-on work with books and manuscripts from across the centuries and sustained engagement with current debates about book, print and media culture. Enrollment limited to12. Instructor permission required. {A}{H}

Spring

ARH 250 Building Baroque Europe (4 Credits)

European architectural, urban and landscape design from (precisely) 1537 to about 1750. Specific topics include Tuscany under the first three grand dukes; Rome in the 17th century; France under the first three Bourbon kings; the rebuilding of London after the Great Fire; the significant enlargement or establishment of capital cities (Turin, Amsterdam, Versailles, Stockholm, St. Petersburg, Dresden, Berlin, Vienna); the rise of the English country house; the English landscape garden; and palaces, pilgrimage churches and monastic complexes in Bavaria, Franconia and Austria. Focus throughout on the fundamental interdependence of architecture and society. Counts for ARU. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 253 The Arts in Britain, 1714–1820 (4 Credits)

Artistic production under the first three Hanoverian kings of Great Britain. Topics include royal patronage; urban developments (London, Bath, Edinburgh); the English landscape garden; the English country house and its fittings; collecting and display; the Grand Tour; aesthetic movements (Gothic Revival, the Sublime, the Picturesque, Neoclassicism); artists’ training and careers (among others, the brothers Adam, Gainsborough, Hawskmoor, Hogarth, Reynolds, Roubiliac and Wright of Derby); maps, prints and books; center vs. periphery; and city vs. country. Reading assignments culled from primary and secondary sources; including travel and epistolary literature. Counts for ARU. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 258 The Arts in Eighteenth-Century France (4 Credits)

A study of painting, sculpture, architecture, urban and landscape design, printmaking and the luxury arts in France, from the last years of Louis XIV's reign to the French Revolution. Recurring themes include artists' training and careers; academies, aesthetics and art theory; art criticism and the viewing public; collecting and display; patronage; and the relationship of art to politics, literature and science. France's pacesetting role in contemporary art is explored by looking beyond its borders to other courts--among them Bourbon Naples, some German-speaking principalities, Great Britain, Russia, Spain and Sweden--and to the French Atlantic world. Counts for ARU. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 278 Race and Gender in the History of Photography (4 Credits)

This course introduces the history of photography, emphasizing the ways photographs represent, mediate, construct and communicate histories of race, gender, sex, sexuality, intimacy and desire. The class studies a variety of photographic images, from the daguerreotype to digital media, from fine arts photography to vernacular images. Students consider objects that have forged connections among loved ones, substantiated memories or served as evidence, considering critical questions about photography’s relationship to identity, affect, knowledge production and power. The course focuses on race and gender, and also attends closely to photography’s relationship to identity broadly speaking, including class, ability and religion. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 281 Modern, Postmodern, Contemporary (4 Credits)

This course examines global artistic tendencies since 1945 in their art-historical and socio-historical contexts. The class considers such developments as American abstraction and the rise of New York, neo-dada, pop, minimalism, conceptual art, earthworks, the influence of feminism, postmodernism, the politics of identity, conceptions of the site and the institution, global publics and the global culture of art, and the theoretical issues and debates that help to frame these topics. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Alternate Years

ARH 283 Architecture Since 1945 (4 Credits)

This course presents a global survey of architecture and urbanism since 1945, from post-World War II reconstruction and planning, through critiques of modernism, to postmodernism, deconstruction, critical regionalism and beyond. Major buildings, projects, movements and tendencies are examined in their historical, theoretical and rhetorical contexts. Counts for ARU. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 285pm Topics: Great Cities-Pompeii (4 Credits)

A consideration of the ancient city: architecture, painting, sculpture and objects of everyday life. Women and freed people as patrons of the arts are emphasized. The impact of the rediscovery of Pompeii and its role as a source of inspiration in 18th-, 19th-, and 20th-century art is discussed. No prerequisite. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 285rm Topics: Great Cities-Rome (4 Credits)

Urban and architectural history of the Eternal City, comprising seven famous hills whose summits and slopes (and the valleys in between) are a cradle of Western civilization. Extensive readings in primary sources and the analysis of works of art of all types will help us understand why Rome has constituted such an indispensable and inexhaustible point of emulative reference from the traditional date of its founding (21 April 753 BCE) to the fascist era and beyond. Considered as well is the relationship between city and country as expressed in the design of villas and gardens through the ages. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 286 History and Theory of Performance Art: Why Did the Performance Artist Cross the Road? (4 Credits)

This class addresses the history and theory of performance art since the 1960s, introducing artists whose work has shaped the field and the issues which have become important in the reception of performance art. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 288 Colloquium: Techniques in Digital Art History (1 Credit)

This course provides students with a robust set of skills for today’s art historian. With an emphasis on hands-on training using Imaging Center facilities, students complete multiple small projects in digital mapping, digital timelines and other data visualizations, scanning and photography of artworks, documenting artwork with international data standards, creating virtual galleries, 3D scanning and more. Short readings on the application of these methods in current art history scholarship is also assigned. Software includes Google MyMaps, Tableau, Timeline JS, Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom, Artstor/JSTOR Forum, Wordpress, Unity and others. S/U only. Enrollment limited to 12. {A}{H}

Interterm

ARH 289 Art and Medicine, Late 18th Century to the Present (4 Credits)

This course examines intersections of art and medicine from the late 18th century to the present. Considering a variety of texts and objects, from wax medical models and public health posters to Mona Hatoum’s cell-like sculptures and photographic coverage of the 2014 Ebola epidemic, the course disentangles how medical understandings of the body filter into artistic production and popular thought and vice versa. While course material is primarily from Europe and the United States, the course attends to the ways medical imaginings of the body engage with imperialism and geopolitical boundaries, as well as race, gender, ability, class and sexuality. (E) {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 290ab Colloquium: The Artist's Book in the 20th Century (4 Credits)

A survey of the genre from its beginnings in the political and artistic avant-garde movements of Europe at the turn of the 20th century through contemporary American conceptual bookworks. In particular, the course examines the varieties of form and expression used by book artists and the relationships between these artists and the sociocultural, literary and graphic environments from which they emerged. In addition to extensive hands-on archival work in the library’s Mortimer Rare Book Room and the museum’s Selma Erving Collection of Livres d’Artistes, students read extensively in the literature of artistic manifestos and of semiotics, focusing on those critics who have explored the complex relationship of word and image. Enrollment limited to 18. Instructor permission required. Group B. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 290ca Colloquium: Topics in Art History-Contemporary Art (4 Credits)

This class examines current issues in contemporary art, suggested by critical debates and significant exhibitions. The class is particularly interested in practices and debates that offer the following: analyses of the global condition of art; demonstrations of the influence of new technologies; reflections on institutional frameworks; excavations of earlier art-historical moments; and accounts of the shifting status of art, artists and audiences in the contemporary public sphere. Prerequisite: One 200-level art history course, or equivalent. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 290cg Colloquium: Cities, Gardens, Utopias: 1400-1900 (C) (4 Credits)

Characteristic forms and the ritual, social, political, economic and cultural significance of the built environment in Europe and the Americas. Capital cities (among them Amsterdam, Berlin, Florence, Karlsruhe, London, Madrid, Mannheim, Paris, Rome, St. Petersburg, Stockholm and Washington, D.C.); colonial cities (among them Boston, Cuzco and Philadelphia) communities founded by the religiously persecuted or the religiously inspired; garrison towns; industrial towns; urban infrastructure (streets, squares, provisioning of water and other utilities, public transportation, and public amenities); garden design in England, France and Italy; Utopian thought and planning; and city vs. country. Counts for ARU. Prerequisite: ARH 110 recommended. Enrollment limited to 20. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 290cv Colloquium: Topics in Art Historical Studies-Visual Culture and Colonization (4 Credits)

How does conquest by foreigners change the ways that images, civic spaces and objects are created and used? What kinds of hybrids does colonization produce? Is it possible to describe what is “colonial” about art or architecture? Focusing on recent scholarship, this course addresses these queries, highlighting the 16th–19th centuries. Among the topics we consider are interpretive work in the field of “colonial studies,” the mapping and construction of colonial spaces, exchanges that brought people and objects into contact (and conflict) with one another, how colonialism can shape the meaning of objects, and the nationalist histories of colonial projects. Enrollment limited to 20. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 290fs Colloquium: Topics in Art History-The Visual Culture of Freed Slaves in the Roman Empire (4 Credits)

Many ancient Roman houses and tombs belonged to freed slaves who had established themselves and their families in the world. Assessed through the lens of elite authors who disparaged freed people, these monuments have often been judged as lesser, imperfectly emulating lost aristocratic models. On the contrary, as a close reading of these houses and tombs themselves demonstrate, freedmen and freedwomen celebrated their transformation from being things to being persons of means by finding visual means to celebrate their industry, their wealth, their ambition and their identification with mythological figures who had once been enslaved. Enrollment limited to 20. {A}{H}

Spring, Alternate Years

ARH 290gi Colloquium: Topics in Art Historical Studies-Gothic in the Modern Imagination (4 Credits)

From College Hall to Hogwarts and Romantic ruins to video games, Gothic visual culture has provided a vast reservoir of materials for post-medieval cultural productions, both historicizing and deliberately anachronistic. Salient moments in the reception of medieval art and architecture are examined to understand how they have served differing cultural and political agendas from the 18th century onward. Topics include: Gothic Revival architecture; Troubadour and Pre-Raphaelite paintings; American Gothic; the Anarchist cathedral; the Middle Ages in film and fashion. Counts for ARU. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 290ib Colloquium: Topics in Art Historical Studies-Playing with Ink and Brush (4 Credits)

For more than a thousand years, ink has been maintained as the principal medium of painting and calligraphy in East Asia. This course surveys the continuities and ruptures of East Asian ink art seen through the formal, cultural and political factors. It also unravels the constant re-appropriation of the “archaic” medium. The course embraces art works in various media—paintings, calligraphy, books, woodblock prints, installation, performance and animation—that were created by premodern and modern artists. Sessions are organized both thematically and according to a rough, chronological sequence. Enrollment limited to 20. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 290ic Colloquium: Topics in Art History-Iconoclasm (4 Credits)

Why have individuals and groups been moved to destroy art? How has art been construed as both essential, bewitching and dangerous? This class considers representational imagery in ancient Greece and Rome, and in Judaic and Islamic traditions; the Byzantine iconoclastic controversy; 16th-century Northern European iconoclasm and the coincident wholesale destruction of indigenous American art; the Counter-Reformation validation of religious imagery; the French Revolution; and attacks on works of art in the modern world. Students consider censorship and philistinism generally, and when (or whether) campaigns of renovation and restoration can legitimately be called iconoclasm. Enrollment limited to 18. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 290lb Collloquium: Topics in Art History-The Presence of the Past: Libraries as a Building Type in the Ancient Mediterranean World (4 Credits)

This course looks at the famed third-century BCE library at Alexandria, Egypt, precedents like the library of the Assyrian king Assurbanipal at Nineveh (with epics and omen texts on clay tablets) and later extant examples like the Library of Celsus at Ephesus to discuss the development of the library as a public building type. The class also compares later innovations like Labrouste’s Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève in Paris, Snøhetta’s award-winning 2002 Bibliotheca Alexandrina (on the site of the ancient library) and Maya Lin’s renovation of Neilson Library, analyzing how the buildings themselves make knowledge manifest. Counts for ARU. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 290ls Colloquium: Topics in Art Historical Studies-Age of Louis XIV (4 Credits)

An examination of the fundamental role of the visual arts in fashioning an extraordinary and indelible image of rulership during the reign (1643–1715) of Louis XIV. Ensembles and individual objects in many media—painting, sculpture, architecture, landscape design, prints, illustrated books, furniture, tapestries, numismatics, works commissioned or obtained in Rome, and literary production—are related to the centralized bureaucracy that came to define the French state. Time permitting, students may consider the impact of the palace of Versailles on other European courts. Enrollment limited to 20. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 290mc Colloquium: Topics in Art Historical Studies-Meditations in Caves (4 Credits)

The course is an introduction to Buddhist grottoes of East Asia. We will learn the historical trajectories of Buddhist grottoes, including the development of cave architecture, mural painting, and sculpture. It pays special attention to the site specificity of the visual imageries, and their transmissions, commissions, and functions. The case studies in this course range from the Kizil Caves and Mogao Caves in Northwestern China, to the Yungang Caves and Longmen Caves in the central plains, and the Seokguram Caves in the Korean Peninsula. We will also consider the collecting, preserving and displaying of Buddhist grottoes in the contemporary world. Enrollment limited to 20. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 290qt Colloquium: Topics in Art History-Queer and Trans Visual Culture (4 Credits)

As representations of queer and trans subjectivities has left the largely coded citations of the closet, they have come to rely on discursively complex and intersectional forms of representation that at once exceed, and rely on, queer cultures, communities, and even subjects. Queer and trans visual culture has long offered a way for queer subjects to both represent, and come to understand, who they are and how meaning is inscribed onto and through [their] bodies. This class leverages history and theory to explore a range of media from fine art to popular culture, and develop a queer lens with which to interrogate visual culture. This class maps the trajectory from the early twentieth century to our present moment, and ultimately seeks to describe what queer visual representation is—and perhaps is not—today. Prerequisite: ARH 110. Enrollment limited to 25. (E) {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 290ra Colloquium: Topics in Art History-Representing Animals (4 Credits)

This colloquium investigates the space between animal studies and art history. Examining case studies from the early modern period to the present, the class considers questions such as: What constitutes the animal, and how do images shape responses to this question? How and why have artists deployed animals as visual signs? How did the collection of animal specimens in the West both depend on and sustain networks of imperialism? Students' conversations will center around the meaningful role images and objects play in shaping understandings of the human, the animal, nature, identity and both human and animal culture. Prerequisite: ARH 110. Enrollment limited to 20. (E) {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 290ss Colloquium: Topics in Art Historical Studies-Swords and Scandals (4 Credits)

Since the beginning of cinema, the decadence of the ancient Romans has been a subject of fascination. Starting with HBO's Rome (2005-2007) and Ridley Scott's Gladiator (2000), we'll explore the multiple sources of the visual tropes used to construct this universe and seek to analyze it in aesthetic, historical, and ideological terms. Their twentieth-century counterparts from films of the silent era to Hollywood epics like Spartacus (1960) and Cleopatra (1963) as well as cult classics like Caligula (1979) will be scrutinized in order to gain an understanding of how Romans function cinematically as cultural signs in varying historical contexts. Enrollment limited to 20. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 320 Art & Money: A Calderwood Seminar on Public Writing (4 Credits)

Art and money are inextricably intertwined. We’ll delve into the ramifications of this relationship in the ways art is valued in the contemporary art market and the consequences for museums, collectors, artists, and for the general public. Topics include artists’ self-fashioning for the market as well as the historical detective work it takes to reveal the practices which have fed this market of limited supply and infinite demand including looting and forgery. These are stories which need to be shared with an ever-wider audience especially in a time when the importance of art to humankind needs reevaluation. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 350 Seminar: The Arts in England, 1485-1714 (4 Credits)

Constitutional limits on monarchical power, the embrace of Protestantism, religious intolerance and fanaticism, revolution and regicide, and a much vaunted (when not exaggerated and misleading) insularity, set the stage in England for patterns of patronage and a relationship to the visual arts both similar to and significantly different from modes established in Continental absolutist courts. While critically examining the perennial notion of "the Englishness of English art," we shall study the careers of the painters, printmakers, sculptors, architects and landscape designers whose collective efforts made English art, at long last, one to be reckoned with. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 352ce Seminar: Topics in Art History-Imperial Matter: The Arts of China's Early Empires (4 Credits)

Why did the First Emperor of China build his grand mausoleum as a microcosm? What foreign motifs and luxury goods were brought to the Chinese proper and by whom? How did trade and war affect the making of the arts 2,000 years ago? These are some of the core questions embedded in this seminar, which investigates the power of things that made a difference in shaping the conditions of the Qin and the Han, Chinese first empires. Throughout the semester, students closely examine art objects and read leading scholars of early imperial Chinese art around the world. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required. Counts for ARU. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 352gr Seminar: Topics in Art History-The Grand Tour (4 Credits)

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, European aristocrats and others undertook journeys abroad, sometimes several years in length, to develop and hone their appreciation of history, culture and the visual arts, with Italy as the privileged destination. While sojourning here and there, tourists sought works of art (printed images importantly among them) that recorded the buildings, paintings and sculptures they had encountered, and artists in Rome and elsewhere strove to turn this demand to account. This seminar explores this and numerous other facets of this striking and consequential form of multicultural education and precursor of modern mass tourism. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 352rp Seminar: Topics in Art History- Uncollecting: Repatriations, Reparations and the Ethics of Return (4 Credits)

This course studies the ethics of return, focusing on collections of belongings made under colonial conditions. Across the 2000s, hundreds of artifacts, artworks, ancestral creations and animal (including human) bodies have been repatriated. But what does it mean to “return” belongings taken—indeed, often stolen—in the colonial past? What, really, can repatriation accomplish? Is reparation a better option, and what might it entail? Drawing examples from a wide range of geographies, and highlighting recent—especially decolonial—scholarship, the course debates these issues. Open to students in any discipline. Pre-req: one class in the visual arts, archaeology, anthropology, museum studies or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 352vc Seminar: Topics in Art History-Visual Culture and Colonization (4 Credits)

How does conquest by foreigners change the ways that images, civic spaces and objects are created and used? How do different forms of colonialism shape the meaning of objects? What kinds of loss does colonization produce, what kinds of resilience? Focusing on recent scholarship, this seminar addresses these queries, highlighting the 16th–19th centuries. Among the topics we consider: the mapping and construction of colonial spaces, exchanges that brought people and objects into contact (and conflict), nationalist histories of colonial projects, and current debates about decolonization, repatriation and reparation. Juniors and seniors only. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission required. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 374bc Seminar: Topics in 20th and 21st Century Art-Border Crossings in Contemporary Art (4 Credits)

Border crossing, voluntary or involuntary, has become an important theme in contemporary global art, framing the conditions of the exile and the “illegal alien,” the tourist and the refugee, the service worker and the sex slave. This seminar examines the work of a range of contemporary artists examining border crossings of various kinds, focusing especially on the models and experiences of globalization that emerge through their practices. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARH 390 Seminar: Art History Capstone (4 Credits)

The capstone provides students with an opportunity to reflect on their path through the major, to develop projects that grow out of and synthesize their previous coursework. It enables students to have an overview of things achieved and to showcase their competence in an area of focus in planning for their futures. The class is designed to support the challenge of conceptualizing and developing individual projects: weekly class meetings will provide scaffolding for student progress. In the collaborative workshop space of the class, students share their projects in stages, which are discussed and edited by their peers. Prerequisites: ARH 110, ARH 190 and at least two 200-leve ARH courses. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required. {A}{H}

Spring

ARH 400 Special Studies (2-4 Credits)

Fall, Spring

ARH 430D Honors Project (4 Credits)

Fall, Spring, Annually

ARS 162 Introduction to Digital Media (4 Credits)

An introduction to the use of digital media in the context of contemporary art practice. Students explore content development and design principles through a series of projects involving text, still image and moving image. This class involves critical discussions of studio projects in relation to contemporary art and theory. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 14. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring

ARS 163 Drawing I (4 Credits)

An introduction to visual experience through a study of the basic elements of drawing. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 18. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring

ARS 172 Studio Art Foundations (4 Credits)

This cross-disciplinary studio course involves two-dimensional, three-dimensional and time-based approaches. Students are introduced to a range of conceptual and practical frameworks for making and thinking about art. This course is strongly recommended for students considering the art major. By emphasizing visual thinking, risk-taking and critical reflection, this course also has relevance for other disciplines. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Priority given to first years. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring

ARS 200/ IDP 200 Art & Design: Making Radical Futures (4 Credits)

Offered as IDP 200 and ARS 200. This course explores speculative design practices as a way to collaboratively envision radical social transformation. The course focuses on imagining worlds without capitalism, building on local Solidarity Economy efforts. Students work in small groups to make these visions tangible through stories, installations, performances and models of everyday objects from the future. Students learn to make iteratively as a process of critical thinking, analyze how designed things reaffirm or resist the hegemonic power of capitalism and evaluate project work based on its ability to provoke questions and connect with viewers. Prerequisites: 100-level studio art course or IDP 116 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 16. (E) {A}

Fall, Spring, Annually

ARS 205pz Topics in Studio Art Workshops: Posters, Zines and Prints in Public (2 Credits)

This 7-week studio intensive explores print-based artworks and the expressive qualities of distribution, archive and exchange. We will use printmaking, binding and presentation techniques to consider the personal, collaborative and political scope of print media. Studio Art Workshops allow students with any level of experience to explore a thematic, expanded approach to art practice. When multiple workshops are offered, students may take different topics during the first and second half of the semester for a total of 4 credits. Up to 4 credits of workshops may count toward the Studio Art Major. No prerequisites. Majors and non-majors welcome. S/U only. Enrollment limited to 12. (E) {A}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARS 205sj Topics in Studio Art Workshops: Drawing Social Justice (2 Credits)

This 7-week studio intensive engages topics of social justice as central to our discussion and visual inquiry. Through studio work, artist research, class excursions and short readings, students will use drawing as an expansive medium to conceptualize and relate their ideas. This course is experimental in nature and will have no defined emphasis on traditional drawing techniques, instead we will take an expanded/interdisciplinary media approach to drawing, to explore how critical questions of social justice can be developed into impactful artworks. Studio Art Workshops allow students with any level of experience to explore a thematic, expanded approach to art practice. When multiple workshops are offered, students may take different topics during the first and second half of the semester for a total of 4 credits. Up to 4 credits of workshops may count toward the Studio Art Major. No prerequisites. Majors and non-majors welcome. S/U only. Enrollment limited to 12. (E) {A}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARS 263 Video and Time-Based Digital Media (4 Credits)

This course builds working knowledge of multimedia digital artwork through experience with a variety of software, focusing on video and time-based media. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 14. No prerequisites. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall

ARS 264 Drawing II (4 Credits)

An introduction to more advanced theories and techniques of drawing, including the role of drawing in contemporary art. The emphasis of the class is on both studio work and class discussion. A major topic is the development of independent projects and practice. Students may require additional supplies and are responsible for purchasing them directly. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: ARS 163 or ARS 172 or equivalent. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Alternate Years

ARS 266 Painting I (4 Credits)

Various spatial and pictorial concepts are investigated through the oil medium. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Prerequisite: ARS 163 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 18. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Annually

ARS 269 Lithographic Printmaking I (4 Credits)

Introduction to the printmaking technique of hand-drawn lithography and photographic halftone lithography using Adobe Photoshop. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 12. Prerequisite: ARS 163, or permission of the instructor. {A}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARS 272 Intaglio Printmaking (4 Credits)

This course is an in-depth introduction to the expressive potential of the printed image and the distinct visual and tactile qualities of etching and drypoint. The class explores how prints can function as social devices, manifestations of texture and opportunities for collaboration. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Prerequisite: ARS 163 or ARS 172, or equivalent. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Annually

ARS 273 Sculpture I (4 Credits)

The human figure and other natural forms. Work in modeling and plaster casting. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: ARS 163, ARS 172 or equivalent. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Annually

ARS 274 Projects in Installation I (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to different installation strategies (e.g., working with multiples, found objects, light and site-specificity, among others). Coursework includes a series of projects, critiques, readings and short writing assignments. Students may require additional supplies and are responsible for purchasing them directly. Enrollment limited to 12. Prerequisite: ARS 172 or equivalent. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Annually

ARS 275 The Book: Theory and Practice I (4 Credits)

(1) Investigates the structure of the book as a form; (2) provides a brief history of the Latin alphabet and how it is shaped calligraphically and constructed geometrically; (3) studies traditional and non-traditional typography; and (4) practices the composition of metal type by hand and the printing of composed type on the SP-15 printing presses. A voluntary introduction to digital typography is also offered outside class. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring

ARS 277 Woodcut Printmaking (4 Credits)

Relief printing from carved woodblocks can create images that range from precise and delicate to raw and expressionistic. It is a direct and flexible process that allows for printing on a variety of materials at large and small scales. Students use both ancient and contemporary technologies to produce black and white and color prints from single and multiple blocks. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Prerequisite: ARS 163 or ARS 172, or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Annually

ARS 280 Introduction to Architectural Design Studio: Analog Processes - Ground (4 Credits)

In nurturing architecture’s foundational principles of visual, material and conceptual experimentation, this course lays the foundation for subsequent studios, lifelong learning and curiosity for architectural design processes. It probes the material, organizational and spatial qualities of the ground, a shared horizontal territory inhabited by plants, people and buildings--one that is as much cultural as it is natural. Through iterative and analog processes, students integrate drawing and making to construct and reconstruct lines in the ground. Probing the physical and conceptual ground for natural or constructed patterns, students develop foundation-level design skills within the context of larger environmental and cultural discourses. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Not open to students who have taken ARS 283. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: ARH 110 or equivalent. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Annually

ARS 281 Introduction to Architectural Design Studio: Digital Design Processes - Air (4 Credits)

This studio probes the material, organizational and spatial qualities of the line architecture’s most fundamental element. Through iterative and digital processes which engage light and air as their main references, students integrate drawing and making to construct and reconstruct lines in both virtual and physical space, and in two and three dimensions. Materialization of digital processes is tested through multiple full-scale, physical models. Through the act of making and remaking constructed lines, students oscillate between intuitive and critical modes of thinking, while further developing foundation-level design skills including analytic drawing, digital fabrication, and issues relating to scale and site specificity. Students may require additional supplies and are responsible for purchasing them directly. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: ARS 280 or equivalent. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Annually

ARS 282 Photography I (4 Credits)

An introduction to visual experience through a study of the basic elements of photography as an expressive medium. Each section involves either black and white or a combination of darkroom and digital processes. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: ARS 162 or ARS 172 or equivalent. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Annually

ARS 361 Interactive Digital Multimedia (4 Credits)

This course emphasizes individual and collaborative projects in computer-based interactive multimedia production. Participants extend their individual experimentation with time-based processes and development of media production skills (3D animation, video and audio production) developed in the context of interactive multimedia production for performance, installation or internet. Critical examination and discussion of contemporary examples of new media art augment this studio course. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Prerequisite: ARS 162. Enrollment limited to 14. Instructor permission required. {A}{M}

Fall, Spring, Annually

ARS 362 Painting II (4 Credits)

Painting from models, still life and landscape using varied techniques and conceptual frameworks. Students may require additional supplies and are responsible for purchasing them directly. Prerequisites: ARS 266. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Alternate Years

ARS 363 Painting III (4 Credits)

Advanced problems in painting. Emphasis on thematic self-direction and group critical analysis. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 12. Prerequisite: ARS 362. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Alternate Years

ARS 364 Drawing III (4 Credits)

Advanced problems in drawing, including emphasis on technique and conceptualization. The focus of this course shifts annually to reflect the technical and ideational perspective of the faculty member teaching it. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Prerequisite: ARS 163 and ARS 264. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Alternate Years

ARS 366pc Topics in Painting-Painting Comedy (4 Credits)

Looking at an array of contemporary artists in global and historical contexts, students will create works that explore the comedic modes of irony, wit, melodrama, slapstick, and other visual deliveries of humor. The class will involve short experimental assignments, iterative works, and independent projects, produced in varied painting media. During the semester we will use workshop based studio practices, to explore the personal and cultural idiosyncrasies and conventions, through which humor operates as a visual tension that can tell stories about self, society, politics and power. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Prerequisite: ARS 266. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARS 370se Topics in Installation Art-Unforgotten: Memory and Socially Engaged Art (4 Credits)

In this course, the class creates and critically interrogates socially engaged art. The focus is the subset of those practices that originate and gain power from remembering events of the past. Formats include site interventions, community collaborations, performance, traditional studio practices or intersections of these. The processes and physical forms of the (art) works complicate boundaries between art and education, art and sociology, and art and activism. The course is organized as a laboratory/workshop to experiment with ideas and forms of socially engaged art. At the same time, students discuss (aesthetic and participant impact) rubrics for these projects and analyze their efficacy. Students may require additional materials and are responsible for purchasing them directly. Prerequisite: One 4-credit studio art course. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Annually

ARS 372 Printmaking, Mark-Making, Image-Making, World-Making (4 Credits)

This course is an opportunity for students to expand upon their existing printmaking knowledge and learn how to combine multiple processes such as intaglio, relief, monotype and lithography. The class pays attention to the unique marks made by each process; considers the relationship between drawn, digital and photographic images in print; and uses the capacity to print multiples as a means to construct physical, social or narrative forms. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Prerequisite: at least one 4-credit 200-level printmaking course or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Alternate Years

ARS 374 Sculpture II (4 Credits)

Advanced problems in sculpture using bronze casting, welding and various media. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Prerequisites: ARS 273. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Annually

ARS 376 Printmaking: Color, Texture and Scale (4 Credits)

This course is an opportunity for students to expand upon their existing printmaking knowledge and learn how to combine multiple processes such as intaglio, relief, monotype and lithography. The class explores printmaking as a transformative process that creates rich, layered color relationships, builds and responds to texture and converts information into multiples. Students have the chance to work at ambitious scales, including using print media to create installations, three-dimensional forms or distributable public projects. Hand-drawn, digital and photographic approaches are available. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Prerequisite: one 4-credit 200-level printmaking course. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Alternate Years

ARS 380 Architectural Design Studio: Transient Spaces - Terrestrial Bodies (4 Credits)

This research-based architectural design studio utilizes digital processes to analyze and reinterpret canonical architectural precedents, linking the digital to fluid conceptual ideas which are both historic and contemporary. In particular, the studio probes the spatial qualities of the moving body—as a site of both deep interiority and hyper-connectivity. In a return to the territory of the ground (see ARS 280), and within the larger context of ecologically and geopolitically induced migration and displacement, this studio investigates themes related to mobility and transience and the ways in which the body traverses territories of ground. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: ARS 280 and ARS 281 or equivalent. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Annually

ARS 381 Architectural Design Studio: Transient Spaces - Aquatic Bodies (4 Credits)

In a return to probing the material, organizational and spatial qualities of the line (see ARS 281), this research-based architectural design studio questions the agency of the line in relationship to contemporary issues of mobility and migration. In particular, this studio privileges the sea as a lens from which to view a changing world order and to explore ways in which architectural representation may be foregrounded as an investigative and speculative site. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Prerequisites: ARS 280 and ARS 281. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Annually

ARS 383 Photography II (4 Credits)

Advanced exploration of contemporary photographic techniques and concepts. Students work on assigned and self-directed projects using various analog and digital techniques, studio lighting, large-format printing, and interdisciplinary approaches. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Prerequisites: ARS 282. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Alternate Years

ARS 384em Topics in Photography: Photography as Extended Media (4 Credits)

This course explores the possibilities of photography, expanding its boundaries in relation to sculpture, moving image, technology and installation. Structured in four sections, students respond to assignments within each section and work on an independent final project. Possible areas of studio exploration include darkroom and digital production, camera-less processes, moving image and installation. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. This course can be repeated once for credit with a different topic. Enrollment limited to 14. Prerequisite: ARS 282. Instructor permission required. (E) {A}

Spring, Alternate Years

ARS 384lv Topics in Photography: Light--Visibility and Erasure (4 Credits)

This course explores the technological, poetic, and conceptual potential of light within photography and lens-based practices. Approaches include material-focused darkroom processes, studio lighting techniques, and the option to work with digital production and presentation technologies (such as scanning, laser cutting, projection, or VR). The course incorporates quick experimentation and sustained independent work, engaging ways in which light (and its absence) is a central lever within photographic production, materiality, and meaning. This course can be repeated once for credit with a different topic. Enrollment limited to 12. Prerequisites: ARS 282 . Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARS 385 Senior Studio I (4 Credits)

This capstone course is required for all senior ARS majors. Students use the framework of the course to focus, challenge and re-conceptualize their studio work in media of their choice. Critiques, readings, written assignments, presentations and discussions support the development of an inventive and rigorous independent art practice. The semester culminates in a group exhibition. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to Smith College Senior ARS majors. {A}

Fall

ARS 389/ LSS 389 Broad-Scale Design and Planning Studio (4 Credits)

Offered as LSS 389 and ARS 389. This class is for students who have taken introductory landscape studios and are interested in exploring more sophisticated projects. It is also for architecture and urbanism majors who have a strong interest in landscape architecture or urban design. In a design studio format, the students analyze and propose interventions for the built environment on a broad scale, considering multiple factors (including ecological, economic, political, sociological and historical) in their engagement of the site. The majority of the semester is spent working on one complex project. Students use digital tools as well as traditional design media and physical model building within a liberal arts-based conceptual studio that encourages extensive research and in-depth theoretic inquiry. Previous studio experience and two architecture or landscape studies courses suggested. Priority given to LSS minors and ARU majors. Enrollment limited to 14. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Variable

ARS 390 Five College Advanced Studio Seminar (4 Credits)

This course is limited to junior and senior art majors from the five colleges. Particular emphasis is placed on thematic development within student work. Sketch book, written self-analysis and participation in critique sessions is expected. Students may require additional materials and are responsible for purchasing them directly.Enrollment limited to 15, three students from each of the five colleges. Prerequisites: selection by faculty; junior and senior art majors, advanced-level ability. Offered in rotation within the five colleges. Normally offered at Smith every fifth fall. {A}

Fall

ARS 399 Senior Studio II (4 Credits)

This one-semester capstone course is required of senior and junior (completing in fall semester) Plan B majors. Students create work in media of their choice and develop the skills necessary for presenting a cohesive exhibition of their work at the end of their final semester, as required by the Plan B major. Course material includes installation or distribution techniques for different media, curation of small exhibitions of each others’ work, and development of critical discourse skills through reading, writing and speaking assignments. In addition to studio faculty, Smith museum staff may occasionally present topics of conceptual and/or practical interest. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Senior ARS Majors only. {A}

Spring

ARS 400 Special Studies (1-4 Credits)

Normally for junior and senior majors. Written project description required. Students may require additional materials and are responsible for purchasing them directly.

Fall, Spring

ARS 430D Honors Project (4 Credits)

Special approval required.

Fall, Spring, Annually

Crosslisted Courses

AMS 302 Seminar: The Material Culture of New England, 1630–1860 (4 Credits)

This course examines the material culture of everyday life in New England from the earliest colonial settlements to the Victorian era. It introduces students to the growing body of material culture studies and the ways in which historic landscapes, architecture, furniture, textiles, metalwork, ceramics, foodways and domestic environments are interpreted as cultural documents and as historical evidence. Offered on-site at Historic Deerfield (with transportation available from the Smith campus), the course offers students a unique opportunity to study the museum’s world-famous collections in a hands-on, interactive setting with curators and historians. Utilizing the disciplines of history, art and architectural history, anthropology, and archaeology, students explore the relationships between objects and ideas and the ways in which items of material culture both individually and collectively convey patterns of everyday life. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required. {A}{H}

Spring

ARH 201/ POR 201 Brazilian Art Inside and Out (4 Credits)

Offered as POR 201 and ARH 201. This course serves as an introduction in English to contemporary and modern Brazilian art. Course materials and class discussions address such topics as public vs. private art spaces, national vs. global identities, the role of art as agency for social change and as site of memory, activism, resistance and transformation. {A}

Fall, Variable

ARH 217/ CLS 217 Greek Art and Archaeology (4 Credits)

Offered as CLS 217 and ARH 217. This course is a contextual examination of the art and architecture of Ancient Greece, from the end of the Bronze Age through the domination of Greece by Rome (ca. 1100-168 BCE) and handles an array of settlements, cemeteries and ritual sites. It tracks the development of the Greek city-state and the increasing power of the Greeks in the Mediterranean, culminating in the major diaspora of Greek culture accompanying the campaigns of Alexander the Great and his followers. The course takes a broadly chronological approach, and the question of a unified Greek culture is stressed. Continuing archaeological work is considered. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Alternate Years

ARS 200/ IDP 200 Art & Design: Making Radical Futures (4 Credits)

Offered as IDP 200 and ARS 200. This course explores speculative design practices as a way to collaboratively envision radical social transformation. The course focuses on imagining worlds without capitalism, building on local Solidarity Economy efforts. Students work in small groups to make these visions tangible through stories, installations, performances and models of everyday objects from the future. Students learn to make iteratively as a process of critical thinking, analyze how designed things reaffirm or resist the hegemonic power of capitalism and evaluate project work based on its ability to provoke questions and connect with viewers. Prerequisites: 100-level studio art course or IDP 116 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 16. (E) {A}

Fall, Spring, Annually

ARS 389/ LSS 389 Broad-Scale Design and Planning Studio (4 Credits)

Offered as LSS 389 and ARS 389. This class is for students who have taken introductory landscape studios and are interested in exploring more sophisticated projects. It is also for architecture and urbanism majors who have a strong interest in landscape architecture or urban design. In a design studio format, the students analyze and propose interventions for the built environment on a broad scale, considering multiple factors (including ecological, economic, political, sociological and historical) in their engagement of the site. The majority of the semester is spent working on one complex project. Students use digital tools as well as traditional design media and physical model building within a liberal arts-based conceptual studio that encourages extensive research and in-depth theoretic inquiry. Previous studio experience and two architecture or landscape studies courses suggested. Priority given to LSS minors and ARU majors. Enrollment limited to 14. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Variable

CLS 238 The Age of Heroes: Archaeology of the Eastern Mediterranean Bronze Age (4 Credits)

For many of us, the Mediterranean Bronze Age is associated with mythological events like the Trojan War. But how did the people of the Bronze Age actually live? This course surveys the archaeology of the Eastern Mediterranean Bronze Age, including Egypt and the Aegean, among others, from 3000 to 1100 BCE. We explore not only the pyramids and palaces of the period, but also the evidence for day-to-day living, from crafts production to religion. We also examine how these cultures interacted, and the Mediterranean networks that both allowed them to flourish and led to their collapse. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Alternate Years

FMS 350sd Seminar:Topics-Questions of Cinema-Film and Visual Culture from Surrealism to the Digital Age (4 Credits)

This class investigates the moving image and its relationship to the rest of 20th and 21st century art, especially visual culture. Working with the premise that film has been arguably the most influential, powerful and central creative medium of the age, the course examines how film has been influenced by, and how it has influenced, interacted with, critiqued, defined, and been defined by other media. Historically we examine how film has moved from a marginal to a mainstream art form, while still often maintaining a very active avant-garde practice. We’ll look at how cinema and other moving images have consistently and trans-historically grappled with certain fundamental issues and themes, comparing the nature of cinematic investigations with those of other media. Over the course of the semester, we shall also attend to the idea of “film” in relation to the larger category of “moving image.” Does not fulfill ARH research seminar requirement. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required. {A}

Fall, Spring, Variable

FYS 131 Paris: City of Light (4 Credits)

Urban, architectural, and cultural history of Paris, from its founding some 2,000 years ago through the twentieth century. We will explore the layout of streets and parks; the provisioning of infrastructure (water, sewers, public transportation); building typologies; châteaux and country houses in the capital's environs; the social, economic, political, and aesthetic contexts of architectural patronage; and how the built environment carries decipherable symbolic meaning. Paris as a subject in the visual arts––in the Impressionist era in particular––will be examined, as will the city's status as a perennial crucible of fashion, avant-gardism, and modernism. Enrollment limited to 16 first-years. WI {A}{H}

Fall

FYS 197 On Display: Museums, Collections and Exhibitions (4 Credits)

Why do people collect things and what do they collect? Students explore these questions by focusing on local museums and exhibitions. From a behind-the-scenes look at the Smith College Museum of Art to an examination of hidden gems like the botanical sciences herbarium collection or that cabinet of curiosities which is Mount Holyoke’s Skinner Museum, students research the histories of these collections and analyze the rationale of varying systems for ordering objects. By learning the critical skills of visual analysis and by grappling with the interpretations of art historians, anthropologists and psychologists, students attempt to come to an understanding of how knowledge is constructed in the context of display and how visual juxtapositions can generate meaning. Enrollment limited to 16 first-years. WI

Fall, Spring, Variable

IDP 106 The Renaissance (2 Credits)

The French word renaissance means "rebirth"; when capitalized, it defines both a chronological period (ca. 1300-1600) in European history and an impactful engagement with the legacy of Greco-Roman antiquity. The descriptor was devised, importantly, at the time, not retrospectively. This course describes events, activities and innovations widely understood as a defining and indispensable foundation of the modern world’s global turn. Lectures treat and contextualize various topics: history, language, education, manuscripts and printed books, court culture, trade and colonization, the invention of utopia, the rise of Protestantism, theater in Shakespeare’s London, science and mathematics and the visual arts. {A}{H}

Fall, Spring, Alternate Years

IDP 325 Art/Math Studio (4 Credits)

This course is a combination of two distinct but related areas of study: studio art and mathematics. Students are actively engaged in the design and fabrication of three-dimensional models that deal directly with aspects of mathematics. The class includes an introduction to basic building techniques with a variety of tools and media. At the same time each student pursues an intensive examination of a particular-individual-theme within studio art practice. The mathematical projects are pursued in small groups. The studio artwork is done individually. Group discussions of reading, oral presentations and critiques, as well as several small written assignments, are a major aspect of the class. Limited to juniors and seniors. Instructor permisison required. Enrollment is limited to 15. {A}{M}

Spring

JUD 238 Sacred Space in Jewish Antiquity (4 Credits)

This course examines archaeological and textual evidence to explore how diverse Jewish groups in antiquity constructed sacred spaces, and ultimately Jewish identity, through art, architecture, and ritual. (E) {A}{H}

Fall, Variable

LAS 291 Colloquium: Decolonize This Museum? (4 Credits)

What does it mean to de-colonize a museum? How does such work happen, and who actually does the "decolonizing?" With these questions as guide, this class considers Latin American museums--of art, natural history, local and other histories--through comparative lenses. Decolonizing conversations are taking place in many parts of the world, and so this course addresses Latin American and Latinx projects in relation to those taking place in Africa and the Pacific Islands, in western Europe and North America. Independent research projects will figure prominently; recommended: at least one class in Latin American and Latino/a Studies, art history, anthropology. {A}{H}{S}

Fall, Spring, Variable

LAS 301ae Seminar: Topics in Latin American and Latino/a Studies-Contesting Space: Art, Ecology, Activism (4 Credits)

What do artists have to say to activists and scientists? Students in this seminar will immerse in case studies drawn from Latin American and Latinx geographies (1970s to the present) to explore the promises and pitfalls of cultural experiments across boundaries of knowledge-making in art, ecology and activism. We will work with a range of public culture technologies--including digital storytelling, social and print media--to illuminate these “activist ecologies” for diverse publics outside academia. Open to juniors and seniors of any major. Some background in the study of the Latinx/Latin America(s) required. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and Seniors only. Instructor permission required. {A}{H}{S}

Fall, Spring, Variable

REL 280 South Asian Visual Culture (4 Credits)

How does one make sense of what one sees in South Asia? What is the visual logic behind the production and consumption of images, art, advertising and film? This course considers the visual world of South Asia, focusing on the religious dimensions of visuality. Discussions include the divine gaze in Hindu and Buddhist contexts, the role of god-posters in religious ritual and political struggle, the printed image as contested site for visualizing the nation and the social significance of clothing and commercial films in colonial and contemporary India. Students also work closely with holdings from the Smith College Art Museum.

Fall, Spring, Variable

Galleries & Spaces

Jannotta Gallery

The Jannotta Gallery showcases student artwork throughout the academic year, concluding with multiple exhibitions by senior studio art and architecture majors.

interior of Jannotta Gallery

Oresman Gallery

The Oresman Gallery is an exhibition space within the Smith College Department of Art that is dedicated to showing recent work by professional artists.

Photo of Oresman Gallery

Inside the Brown Fine Arts Center

The Imaging Center

The Imaging Center features image collections, software training, 2D and 3D printing and more to support the study and production of visual arts.  

Student in the virtual reality room in the Imaging Center

Hillyer Art Library

The library offers broad-based coverage of the history, theory, criticism and practice of the visual arts.

book shelves in the Hillyer Library

Smith College Museum of Art

The museum cultivates inquiry and reflection by connecting people to art, ideas and each other, with more than 27,000 objects in the collections. 

Student sitting on a bench looking at paintings inside the art museum

Prizes, Internships & Opportunities

Students may compete for four prizes awarded annually by the Department of Art. Detailed application information and submission deadlines for each of the individual prizes are posted below early in the spring semester.

In addition to the four prizes awarded by the Department of Art, the Smith College Musuem of Art also offers the Tryon Prizes for Writing and Art.

The Megan Hart Jones Studio Art Prize was established in 1987 by family and friends in memory of Megan Hart Jones ’88. The prize is awarded annually to one undergraduate for outstanding work in drawing, photography, painting, sculpture, architecture, printmaking, or the graphic arts. Normally announced on Ivy Day, winners of the Megan Hart Jones Studio Award receive a substantial cash prize.

How To Apply

The Megan Hart Jones Studio Art Prize is no longer accepting applications for the 2023 Academic Year. Please check back in early 2024 for the 2024 Application.

2022-2023 Recipients
  • Calvin Morriss ’25 - Comfort
  • Lily Watson ’25 - Last Supper
  • Kloe Keidel ’25 - The Uninvited Guest (or “Sick Bird”)

Established in 1978 by friends and former students of Professor Lehmann, this prize is awarded annually to seniors majoring in the history of art to support educational travel opportunities. Preference is given to students interested in pursuing the study of art history, especially classical antiquity, at the graduate level. Classical studies majors and archaeology minors are also encouraged to apply.

How To Apply

The Phyllis Williams Lehmann Travel Award is no longer accepting applications for the 2023 Academic Year. Please check back in early 2024 for the 2024 Application.

2022–2023 Recipients

Flora Arnsberger ’23, Sally (Xiaomeng) Zhang ’23

Established in 1990 by family and friends in memory of Elizabeth Killian Roberts ’45, this prize is awarded annually for the best drawing. Entries are judged by faculty in the Department of Art. Normally announced on Ivy Day, winners of the Roberts Award receive a substantial cash prize.

How To Apply

The Elizabeth Killian Roberts Prize is no longer accepting applications for the 2023 Academic Year. Please check back in early 2024 for the 2024 Application.

2022–2023 Recipient

Ava Harper ’24J 

The Enid Silver Winslow ’54 Prize in Art History is awarded annually for the best student paper completed for an art history course taught at Smith. A student can submit only one paper for consideration. Papers are judged anonymously by a committee of art history faculty. Traditionally announced on Ivy Day, winners of the Winslow award receive a substantial cash prize.

How to Apply

The Enid Silver Winslow ’54 Prize in Art History is no longer accepting applications for the 2023 Academic Year. Please check back in early 2024 for the 2024 Application.

2022–2023 Recipients

Dinah Rogers ’26
Form, Function, Fragment: Content within Structural Context in Taddeo di Bartolo's Death of Saint Peter Martyr

Tori Currier ’23J
Distinguishing Sham Gothic Ruins: Political Monuments and Art Objects

Internships Awarded by the Art Department

The Toledo Museum of Art and Smith College Department of Art offer a paid summer internship for two qualifying students interested in exploring a career in art museums. 

Recipients of the Alice Williams Carson ’37 Endowed Internship will work in the Curatorial Department for the duration of the internship period. This internship provides students with the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in museum practice while working closely with curatorial staff on various projects. Intern duties may include object and collections-based research, assisting curators with aspects of exhibition planning, supervised handling of objects, label writing, or creating gallery guide content, among other things. 

Internships generally begin in late May or early June and run for eight consecutive weeks. During this period, interns are expected to work full-time (37.5 hours/week). The exact start and end dates may vary depending on students' schedules and the needs of the museum. 

Eligibility 

All Smith students interested in exploring a career in art museums are eligible to apply. No prior museum experience is required.

How to Apply

Please prepare materials and submit the application form by January 19, 2024.

Applications must include:

  • CV (2-page max)

  • Cover Letter (750 words). In your cover letter, please be sure to:

  • Provide a brief description of your educational background and research interests. 

  • Explain your interest in the internship and what you hope to gain by participating, if selected.

  • Describe your future career goals and discuss how this internship will help you to achieve them.

Notes on Submissions

  • Please combine all documents into one PDF file.

  • Title the file “Smith Internship 24_Last Name”

The Elizabeth Schroeder Hoxie ’69 Memorial Fund provides financial support for Department of Art majors and minors (current sophomores and juniors only) who undertake a summer internship of approximately 35 hours of work per week.

How to Apply

The Elizabeth Schroeder Hoxie ’69 Memorial Fund is no longer accepting applications for the 2023 Academic Year. Please check back in early 2024 for the 2024 Application.

2021–22 Recipient

Paige Oliveira ’22

Additional Internships & Opportunities

We recognize that these are challenging times to find and confirm internships and that many opportunities have been cancelled, postponed or significantly modified due to the new coronavirus pandemic. We are working to identify new and updated opportunities as they emerge and will be maintaining this information in the dropdown lists below. Please note that the information provided here is for general information purposes only and does not necessarily reflect our endorsement or recommendation.

In addition to the resources provided in the dropdown lists below, Smith College provides numerous additional resources including those available through the Lazarus Center for Career Development, Praxis Program and Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF).

Studio Assistantship/Work Study/Skill-Building Opportunities

Printmaking

Photography

Architecture Competitions

Artist Residencies

The following museums and galleries are offering virtual tours, videos, talks, archives and access to digital collections. Please note that the information provided here is for general information purposes only and does not necessarily reflect our endorsement or recommendation.

Art Gallery of New South Wales (Sydney, Australia)

Barnes Foundation (Philadelphia, PA, USA)

Brooklyn Museum (Brooklyn, NY, USA)

The Clark (Williamstown, MA, USA)

The Courtauld Institute of Art (London, England)

The Frick Collection (New York, NY, USA)

Google Arts & Culture (offering virtual experiences at many museums around the world)

Henie Onstad (Oslo, Norway)

J. Paul Getty Museum (Los Angeles, CA, USA)

Louisiana Museum of Modern Art (Copenhagen, Denmark)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, NY, USA)

The Met 360° Project This award-winning series of six short videos invites viewers around the world to virtually visit The Met's art and architecture in a fresh, immersive way. Created using spherical 360° technology, it allows viewers to explore some of the Museum's iconic spaces as never before.

MetCollects MetCollects celebrates works of art new to the collection by borrowing the fresh eyes of photographers and the enthusiastic voices of curators, conservators, and, at times, the living artists, collectors, and supporters.

The Modern (Fort Worth, TX, USA)

Musée du Louvre (Paris, France)

Museum of Modern Art (New York, NY, USA)

The National Galleries Scotland (Edinburgh, Scotland)

National Gallery of Art (Washington, DC, USA)

National Museum of Women in the Arts (Washinton, DC, USA)

The Palace Museum (Beijing, China)

Pinacoteca di Brera (Milan Italy)

Platform: New York, featuring 12 New York-based galleries (New York, NY, USA)

The Rijksmuseum (Amsterdam, Holland)

Smith College Museum of Art (Northampton, MA, USA)

Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam (Amsterdam, Holland)

Tallinn Art Hall (Tallinn, Estonia)

Walker Center (Minneapolis, MN, USA)

The Walters Art Museum (Baltimore, MD, USA)

Wellcome Collection (London, England)

Whitney Museum of American Art (New York, NY, USA)

The Vatican’s Museums (Vatican City, Rome, Italy)

Zacheta National Gallery of Art (Warsaw, Poland)

This list provides some ideas for opportunities to enjoy remote and online events, lectures and interviews made available by other arts organizations. Please note that the information provided here is for general information purposes only and does not necessarily reflect our endorsement or recommendation.

Visualizing Abolition (Institute of the Arts & Sciences, UC Santa Cruz)  
Visualizing Abolition is an online event series featuring artists, activists, scholars, and others united by their commitment to the vital struggle for prison abolition. The series highlights the creative practices and critical dialogue currently underway to imagine and create a world beyond prisons and policing. A conversation with noted activists and scholars Angela Y. Davis and Gina Dent will launch the online event series October 20, 2020, 4–5:30pm PST. Events will follow on a regular basis until May 11, 2021. The events are all free and open to the public. Advanced registration is required.

Carpenter Center Online Programming (Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts)  
The Carpenter Center's fall online programming includes conversations between Cauleen Smith and curator Amber Esseiva; Ja’Tovia Gary and Frank B. Wilderson III; David Reinfurt and Larissa Harris; and Kemi Adeyemi with Jessica Bell Brown, Lauren Haynes, and Jamillah James. For each of these conversations, the Carpenter Center will also publish a limited-edition booklet with an edited transcript of the exchange. These booklets will be available for free both as digital downloads and in hard copy upon request.

Women Leaders in the Arts (Brooklyn Museum)  
The directors of three major metropolitan museums—Nathalie Bondil (Montreal Museum of Fine Arts), Kaywin Feldman (National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.), and Anne Pasternak (Brooklyn Museum)—come together to discuss the changing role of museums in the 21st century. The three leaders reflect on their experiences at the helm of encyclopedic museums, explore the challenges museums will face in the future, and consider how cultural institutions can become more accessible, inclusive spaces for community engagement and social justice.

Art Chat @ Five (National Museum of Women in the Arts)  
Jumpstart your weekend with art: Every Friday at 5 p.m. (EDT), join NMWA educators for informal art chats about selected artworks from NMWA’s collection. Each week a new sampling of artworks will be considered.

The Artist Project (Metropolitan Museum of Art)  
The Artist Project asks artists to reflect on what art is and what inspires them from across 5,000 years of art. Their ways of seeing and experiencing art reveal the power of a museum and encourage all visitors to look in a personal way.

Connections (The Metropolitan Museum of Art)  
Connections asks curators, conservators, librarians, educators, editors, designers, photographers, security personnel, and others to offer personal perspectives on the collection. The series introduces an illuminating means of access to The Met collection.

Viewpoints: Body Language (The Metropolitan Museum of Art)  
How does the sculpted body communicate? Hear from Met experts, leading authorities, and rising stars, each with a diverse perspective on the language of gesture, facial expression, and pose.

82nd & Fifth (The Metropolitan Museum of Art)  
82nd & Fifth asks 100 curators to talk about 100 works of art that changed the way they see the world. One curator, one work of art, two minutes at a time. This series demonstrates that the voice of authority, up close, is inspirational.

Audio Interviews (Museum of Modern Art)  
Listen to artists, curators, and others speak about the Museum’s collection and special exhibitions.

Penny Stamps Speaker Series (University of Michigan)  
In a partnership designed to keep the community curious, engaged, and connected, the entire Penny Stamps Speaker Series video archive is available to stream online.

Watch + Listen (Hammer Museum)  
The Hammer's lectures, symposia, film series, readings, and performances aim to spark meaningful encounters with art and ideas.

Video + Audio (Institute of Contemporary Art / Boston)  
Explore videos and audio recordings including exhibition previews, artist interviews, studio visits, and talks between artists and curators.

Clark Connects (The Clark Art Institute)  
While The Clark Art Institute’s galleries are closed and public programs temporarily suspended, the Clark is presenting new virtual programming as part of the Clark Connects project. New content is added every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at noon.

Public Art, Private Vision: bell hooks with Theaster Gates and Laurie Anderson (The New School)  
bell hooks, Theaster Gates and Laurie Anderson discuss art in popular culture today in this talk presented by Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts at The New School.

RAP in the Archives (The Clark Art Institute)  
In honor of The Clark’s regular Tuesday evening lectures, every Tuesday they offer a lecture from a previous season.

Visiting Artist Lecture Series (VALS) 2020 (Syracuse University School of Art)  
VALS is co-presented with In Plain Sight (IPS), a public collaborative artwork of 80+ artists and organizations dedicated to the abolition of immigrant detention and the United States culture of incarceration, and is led by artists Cassils and rafa esparza. IPS includes artist voices who are established and emerging, artists who have been detained, undocumented artists, indigenous artists, and artists descended from those who survived Japanese American incarceration, the Holocaust, and the afterlife of the AIDS crisis. Lectures take place each Thursday, September 3 - November 19, 2020, at 6:30pm (EST).

A Conversation Between ZHENG Bo, Artist and Yao Wu, Jane Chace Carroll Curator of Asian Art  
The Lewis Global Studies Center had planned to host the artist Zheng Bo as our Spring 2020 Leader-in-Residence. Though that residency was necessarily postponed, the artist agreed to co-create a video interview, discussing his art, his activism and his unique vision of what he calls “our inter-species relations” with the world. A self-described “eco-socialist conceptual artist,” Zheng Bo has created award-winning installations and workshops throughout Asia and Europe, highlighting the impact of climate change and offering an alternative, responsible strategy for living on earth.

Art History From Home (Whitney Museum of Art)  
These weekly online talks by the Whitney's Joan Tisch Teaching Fellows highlight works in the Museum's collection to illuminate critical topics in American art from 1900 to the present. During each thirty-minute session, participants are invited to comment and ask questions through a moderated chat.

Whitney Screens (Whitney Museum of Art)  
Engage with art in the Whitney's collection with Whitney Screens. Every Friday, they’re featuring special screenings of video works recently brought into the collection, all by emerging artists, in keeping with the Whitney’s long tradition of supporting artists at the beginning and during key moments of their careers. Screenings will be live-streamed from Vimeo, beginning at 7 p.m.

Glasstire {Texas Visual Art}, Five-Minute Tours  
Video tours of art exhibitions in Texas.

Critical Bounds Podcast  
Critical Bounds is a podcast founded, produced, and hosted by Nicole Bearden (Smith ’19), which considers contemporary art, global issues, and current events that influence and are in turn manifested in artistic practice, through critical conversations with emerging contemporary artists and curators.

Sculpting Lives   
This podcast series explores the lives and careers of five women (Dame Barbara Hepworth, Dame Elisabeth Frink, Kim Lim, Phyllida Barlow, and Rana Begum) who worked (and are still working) against preconceptions, forging successful careers and contributing in ground-breaking ways to the histories of sculpture and art.

Serpentine Galleries Podcast  
Seasonal podcast on art and ideas featuring thematic episodes that bring together artists, writers and thinkers of our time to explore timely questions around technology, ecology and equality.

Talk Art  
Actor Russell Tovey and gallerist Robert Diament host Talk Art, a podcast dedicated to the world of art featuring exclusive interviews with leading artists, curators & gallerists.

FIELD TRIP: Art Across Canada  
This online platform delivers arts experiences with some of Canada’s most celebrated artists in a national partnership with leading arts organizations. From children’s programs to artist talks and workshops, these activities are designed to advance the work of our nation’s organizations through digital platforms for different age groups, on a range of subjects, that engage communities and support artists, particularly during the challenges presented during a pandemic.

Yale Photo Pop-Up Lecture Series  
In each Q&A, Yale School of Art’s Director of Graduate Studies in Photography, Gregory Crewdson, asks a set list of questions to engage each artist in conversation about their practice, as well as how they’re adapting and responding to the current crisis. While the recordings of all of these online events cannot be made publicly available, select clips and full segments are published. The final talk in the series was hosted on Sunday, May 10, 2020.

Virtual Public Lecture Series Archive (Harvard University Graduate School of Design)

This list provides some additional resources for identifying remote and online arts opportunities. Please note that the information provided here is for general information purposes only and does not necessarily reflect our endorsement or recommendation.

MCN Guide to Virtual Museum Resources, E-Learning and Online Collections
Provides links to numerous digital archives and libraries, museums providing virtual tours, online exhibits and collections and e-learning opportunities.

Faculty

Smith’s art department faculty works closely with students. Our award-winning painters and sculptors, scholars and architects value active engagement with the art world. Whether we are doing research, curating museum exhibitions, speaking at conferences or creating work for galleries, our creative energies extend to our work with students, both inside and outside the classroom. We strive to help students cultivate art careers that embrace local, national and international settings.

Alix Gerber

Art

Post-Graduate Fellow in Interdisciplinary Design Practices

Emeriti

Susan Heideman 
Professor Emerita of Art

Caroline Houser 
Professor Emerita of Art

Jaroslaw Volodymyr Leshko 
Professor Emeritus of Art

Chester J. Michalik 
Professor Emeritus of Art

Gary Lewis Niswonger 
Professor Emeritus of Art

Dwight Pogue 
Professor Emeritus of Art

Helen E. Searing 
Alice Pratt Brown Professor Emerita of Art

Art Staff

Lisa Rizzo
Administrative Assistant

Andrew Palmore
Shop Supervisor/Technician

Imaging Center Staff

Luke Blevins
Visual Arts Digital Specialist

Daniel Bridgman
Visual Communication Specialist

Jon Cartledge
Director of the Imaging Center

Betsy Coulter
Imaging Services Coordinator

Elinor Davies
Digital Asset Specialist

Andrew Maurer
Interactive Media Coordinator 

Kevin Pomerleau
Visual Arts Technical Specialist

Contact Department of Art

Hillyer Hall
Smith College
Northampton, MA 01060

Phone: 413-585-3100

Facebook

Imaging Center: 413-585-4568

Academic Assistants:
Lisa Rizzo