Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 18
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Seelye 306 Instructional Method: In-Person

An examination of the broad contours of the history of African American people in the United States from ca. 1600 to 1960. Particular emphasis is given to how African Americans influenced virtually every aspect of U.S. society, slavery and Constitutional changes after 1865, debates on the meaning of freedom and citizenship, and the efforts to contest discrimination, segregation and anti-Black violence.

Crosslist(s): HST
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 24
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Literature
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Seelye 101 Instructional Method: In-Person

Offered as AFR 175 and ENG 236. A survey of the evolution of African American literature during the 20th century. This class builds on the foundations established in AFR 113, Survey of Afro-American Literature 1746 to 1900. Writers include Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison and Paule Marshall.

Crosslist(s): AFR, ENG
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 50
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 16
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: AFR 202 Limit
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM / Burton 219 Instructional Method: In-Person

The African continent’s place as the cradle of humanity has made it central to Anthropology. However, Anthropology’s imperial origins have long put it at odds with the people of the African Diaspora. This course examines the complexities of the relationship between Anthropology and the African Diaspora. The course explores the African Diaspora as space, place and identity; critically examines Anthropology’s history; explores the discipline’s core theories and thinkers; broadens students' thinking of the discipline’s canon; and examines key ethnographies of and from the African diaspora. Enrollment limited to 50.
 

Crosslist(s): AFS, ANT
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 15
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Seelye 306 Instructional Method: In-Person

What constitutes the field of study called Black Political Economy? This course excavates a radical tradition of political economy in African diaspora studies, a tradition which has sheltered some of the most thoroughgoingly insightful perspectives on Black oppression in the Americas over the last 500 years. The course takes a wide-ranging and interdisciplinary approach which draws on several fields, including Africana intellectual history, political economy, sociological studies and cultural studies in its presentation of the field of study termed Black political economy. Enrollment limited to 25.

Crosslist(s): AFS, GOV, LAS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 23
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Literature
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM; Monday | 1:40 PM - 2:55 PM / Seelye 101 Instructional Method: In-Person

How does gender matter in a black context? That is the question this course asks and attempts to answer through an examination of works by such authors as Harriet Jacobs, Frances Harper, Nella Larsen, Zora Hurston, Toni Morrison, Ntozake Shange and Alice Walker.

Crosslist(s): ENG, SWG
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 9
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Literature, Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Dewey 104 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course looks closely at a series of canonical black texts. The intention is to examine these texts in their specific historical context with careful attention to their place within Africana intellectual history. This course either focuses on a series of intensive investigations of a set of major texts within Africana studies, or it operates thematically. A thematic treatment of the course involves taking one leading critical figure within the field – for example Frantz Fanon, Toni Morrison, Aimé Césaire, Paule Marshall or Kamau Brathwaite – and constructing the course around a reflection on their work and influence on the field of Africana studies. Enrollment limited to 15. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Crosslist(s): AFS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 5
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 1
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Wright 238 Instructional Method: In-Person

Tourism is often lauded as the key to economic development for many countries. However, scholarly work has shown that historical relationships to imperialism and colonialism impact how people and places experience tourism. This course introduces students to debates, methods and conceptual frameworks in the study of race, sex and tourism. Through a review of scholarly texts, tourism paraphernalia, films and travelogues, the course examines the social, political and ethical considerations inherent in multiple forms of tourism including eco-tourism, wellness or health, sun-sand-sea, heritage, dark and voluntourism in locales ranging from the Caribbean and the Americas to Africa and Europe. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and Seniors only. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Crosslist(s): SWG
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 3
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 1
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Social Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Seelye 310 Instructional Method: In-Person

What role has grief played in the black freedom struggle? How have conceptions of race and gender been articulated, expanded and politicized through public performances of collective mourning? This seminar explores the ways in which post-emancipation black politics developed through efforts, often led by women, to not only challenge but to also embody and inhabit trauma. The course considers a range of theoretical texts alongside historical documents from the late nineteenth century to today. The course is structured around addressing two major questions: what is the politics of grief and is there such a thing as a particularly black politics of grief? Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and Seniors only. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 7
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / Burton 219 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course uses popular culture as a tool to analyze gender and sexuality in Africa. It discusses relevant issues in gender and sexuality across the continent, using selected African songs and movies, which feature these issues as centralized themes. It also examines the lived experiences of African actors, musicians and artistes, both historical and modern, as a means of discussing social norms on gender and sexuality and their subversion. Enrollment limited to 18. (E)

Crosslist(s): AFR, SWG
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 21
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Literature
Time/Location: Wednesday/Friday | 1:10 PM - 2:35 PM / Seelye 208 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course provides an introduction to American Studies through the interdisciplinary study of American history, life and culture. Students develop critical tools for analyzing cultural texts (including literature, visual arts, music, fashion, advertising, social media, buildings, objects and bodies) in relation to political, social, economic and environmental contexts. The course examines the influence of race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality and transnationality on conceptions of citizenship, and struggles over what it means to be an “American,” and how this has shaped the distribution of power, resources and wellbeing in the United States.

Crosslist(s): LSS, SWG
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 24
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Literature
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM / Seelye 312 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course is designed to introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of Native American and Indigenous Studies. This course looks at the diverse histories of Indigenous nations across North America, as well as histories of shared experiences with ongoing colonialism, legacies of resistance and connections to place. The class focuses on Indigenous perspectives, intellectual traditions and critical interventions across time through the work of historians, anthropologists, philosophers, literary scholars, Indigenous knowledge keepers, poets, writers and activists. This course is required for a Native American and Indigenous Studies focus for American Studies majors.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 17
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / Seelye 302 Instructional Method: In-Person

It is often noted in mainstream news media that Indigenous peoples are “on the front lines” of the climate crisis, while providing little explanation as to why this is. Narratives of inherent Indigenous vulnerability obscure the ways in which Indigenous communities have mobilized to navigate environmental change, not only in the face of contemporary global warming, but historically, as settler colonial incursions radically transformed landscapes and constrained Indigenous knowledge practices that have provided tools for adaptation for thousands of years. This course considers how Indigenous climate vulnerability is largely a product of settler colonialism—not only a process and system, but also a particular way of understanding and relating to the nonhuman environment. Enrollment limited to 25. (E)

Crosslist(s): HST
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 12
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Social Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Seelye 107 Instructional Method: In-Person

Long before settler colonialism was developed as a theoretical lens and settler colonial studies emerged as an academic field, Indigenous peoples in North America were approaching it through their own knowledge traditions and frameworks. This course centers the long history of Indigenous theoretical understandings of settler colonialism: through the work of “prophets” and visionaries like Handsome Lake (Seneca) and Tenskwatawa (Shawnee), “Red Progressives” like Zitkala-Să (Lakota), post-WWII intellectuals like Vine Deloria Jr. (Standing Rock Sioux), and many more. The course also considers how critiques of settler colonialism have been embedded in Indigenous future imaginaries and have been an integral part of the emergence of Indigenous internationalism in the 20th century. Enrollment limited to 25. (E)

Crosslist(s): HST
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 11
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Literature
Time/Location: Wednesday/Friday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / Seelye 306 Instructional Method: In-Person

A seventeenth-century engraving imagines an encounter between two men wearing feathers and holding onto the same string of shells: depending on your perspective, this image looks like a scene of trade or one of theft at knife-point. In understanding moments from the past, representation and perspective shape not just interpretation, but sources themselves. Seeing moments as both trade and theft opens them to tellings and analyses from multiple perspectives, exposing overlooked elements and revealing the ways in which histories are made. This course introduces students to Early American history (c1500-1800) through the themes of trade, theft, representation and perspective.

Crosslist(s): HST
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 18
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Social Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Ford 015 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course places the “Culture Wars” – U.S. political battles waged over issues such as race, gender,
sexuality, the family, abortion, education, guns, climate change and even the “non-partisan” COVID-19
pandemic – into the context of recent U.S. history. The goal of the course is to invite students to think
critically about the workings of the Culture Wars within America’s democratic political system and
about the impact of the Culture Wars on the broader sweep of life in the U.S. The course pays particular
attention to the ways power relationships are manifested, and contested, through the Culture Wars. Enrollment limited to 20.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 9
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Historical Studies
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:40 PM - 4:30 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

This course examines the material culture of everyday life in New England from the earliest colonial settlements to the Victorian era. It introduces students to the growing body of material culture studies and the ways in which historic landscapes, architecture, furniture, textiles, metalwork, ceramics, foodways and domestic environments are interpreted as cultural documents and as historical evidence. Offered on-site at Historic Deerfield (with transportation available from the Smith campus), the course offers students a unique opportunity to study the museum’s world-famous collections in a hands-on, interactive setting with curators and historians. Utilizing the disciplines of history, art and architectural history, anthropology, and archaeology, students explore the relationships between objects and ideas and the ways in which items of material culture both individually and collectively convey patterns of everyday life. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Crosslist(s): ART, BKX, ENV, HST, LSS, MUX
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 11
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: AMS 340 Limit; AMS majors only; JR/SR only
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Social Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Wright 238 Instructional Method: In-Person

According to a growing number of social theorists, and pretty much everybody else, this is an age of crisis. One of the critical tasks is to develop interdisciplinary tools to analyze how environmental conditions, economic systems, technological developments and political ideologies have sent humans on a path of catastrophes: climate change, resource exhaustion, inequality, social fragmentation and political repression. This course examines how these conditions have shaped American culture (asking why news broadcasts, the entertainment industry and social media respond to crises with distraction, disinformation, fear-mongering and scapegoating), and explore efforts of artists and activists to theorize and devise creative and just alternatives in visual arts, fiction, essays, comedy, movies and music. American Studies Majors only. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 14
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: FY/SO only
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Seelye 109 Instructional Method: In-Person

What does it mean to be human? What is culture, and how does it shape the way humans see the world? Why are some forms of cultural difference tolerated, while others are not? As the holistic study of the human experience, cultural anthropology addresses these questions in a world shaped by human migration, climate change, capitalist extraction and global inequality. This course provides an overview of the discipline’s history, its distinctive method of ethnography and the breadth of topics it addresses, including public health, race, the environment, gender, language, nationalism, software design, the body, music, cities, government and more. First-years and sophomores only. Enrollment limited to 25.

Crosslist(s): ENV
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 23
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: FY/SO only
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Sage 215 Instructional Method: In-Person

What does it mean to be human? What is culture, and how does it shape the way humans see the world? Why are some forms of cultural difference tolerated, while others are not? As the holistic study of the human experience, cultural anthropology addresses these questions in a world shaped by human migration, climate change, capitalist extraction and global inequality. This course provides an overview of the discipline’s history, its distinctive method of ethnography and the breadth of topics it addresses, including public health, race, the environment, gender, language, nationalism, software design, the body, music, cities, government and more. First-years and sophomores only. Enrollment limited to 25.

Crosslist(s): ENV
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 41
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Seelye 201 Instructional Method: In-Person

There are many ways to love plants. Home gardeners design with them, healers study their properties to treat patients with them, field botanists learn ornate vocabularies to identify them, poets sound their symbolic depths. What do these different forms of botanophilia say about the human condition and its interspecies intimacies? Living amidst our planet’s sixth mass extinction event, more botanophilia is needed and needed yesterday. Putting love, joy and community forward as urgent political affairs, this course asks how students might go about cultivating plant love for earthly survival.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 12
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM; Monday | 3:05 PM - 4:20 PM / McConnell 102 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course examines sensory perception as a mode of carrying out ethnographic research and a focus of inquiry. Through course readings, students engage with how anthropologists have understood the senses—sight, taste, touch, smell and hearing—as an area of shared, cultural knowledge. Bridging anthropology with sensory related works, students tackle ongoing scholarly concerns and move beyond the legacy of a hierarchical model of the five senses to consider how the senses work together and intertwine with other domains of experience. By analyzing the role of the senses in cultural formations—that is, everyday practices, relations of power, meaning creation and social processes, students ask how are the senses mobilized in collective life? What can the interplay of the senses offer us as a way of understanding social experience? Enrollment limited to 30. (E)

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 11
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / Seelye 208 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course bridges theories of space and materiality in anthropology, considering how a range of ethnographic case studies engage intersections of place, race, gender, class, migration, diaspora, labor and governance, and what they afford for understanding social spaces. From built forms and infrastructures to housing and public zones, the class explores how discussions focused on the material objects and qualities of space contribute to the study of sociocultural experience. Discussions address questions of human spatiality across geographies and regional contexts, theoretical foundations, the making of physical spaces, the spatial tactics of social actors, the qualities of the built environment, and environmental debris and regeneration. Enrollment limited to 30. (E)

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 40
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 41
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 2
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Seelye 301 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course surveys the social and cultural contexts of languages throughout the world. It examines the ways in which a human language reflects the ways of life and beliefs of its speakers, contrasted with the extent of language's influence on culture. The course focuses on topics such as identity, social factors of language use, language vitality, language politics and issues of globalization. Each language is a repository of history and knowledge, as well as the culture, of a group of speakers. Languages and cultures from around the world are discussed, with special focus on endangered languages. Enrollment limited to 40. (E)

Crosslist(s): LNG
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 26
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Natural Science, Social Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM; Monday | 3:05 PM - 4:20 PM / Seelye 308 Instructional Method: In-Person

In Western discourses, African environments are defined by violence, famine and degradation. These characteristics are depicted as symptoms of an African resistance to Western values such as private property, democracy and environmentalism. This course encourages students to think critically about such portrayals by learning about specific environments in Africa and how humans have interacted with them across time. The syllabus is anchored in cultural anthropology, but includes units on human evolution, the origins and spread of pastoralism, the history of colonial conservation science and more. Discussions covered include gender, race, land grabbing, indigenous knowledge, the commons, the cattle complex, desertification, oil, dams and nationalism.

Crosslist(s): AFR, AFS, ENV, HSC
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 24
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: No FY
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Seelye 311 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course reviews the major theoretical approaches and directions in cultural anthropology from the late 19th century to the present. These approaches include social organization and individual agency; adaptation and evolution of human culture; culture and personality, economic behavior, human ecology; the anthropology of development and change; and postmodern interpretation. The works of major anthropologists are explored, including Franz Boas, Bronislaw Malinowski, Margaret Mead, Evans-Pritchard, Claude Levi-Strauss, Marvin Harris, Eric Wolf, Clifford Geertz, Sherry Ortner and others. Prerequisite: ANT 130 or equivalent. Not open to first years.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 17
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM; Monday | 1:40 PM - 2:55 PM / Hatfield 205 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course is a general introduction to anthropological analysis of politics and the political. Through a broad survey of anthropological texts and theories, we explore what an ethnographic perspective can offer to our understandings of power and government. Special emphasis is placed on the role of culture, symbols and social networks in the political life of local communities. Examples are drawn from a number of case studies in Africa, East Asia, Latin America and the United States, and range in scale from studies of local politics in small-scale societies to analyses of nationalism and political performance in modern nation-states. Enrollment limited to 30.

Crosslist(s): GSD
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 26
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science, Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / McConnell B05 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course offers an overview of the archaeology of South America, from the earliest traces of human occupation over 10,000 years ago to the material culture of the present. The course focuses on how archaeologists use data collected during settlement surveys, site excavations and artifact analysis to reconstruct households and foodways, social and political organization, and ritual and identity over the millennia. Discussions also include the relevance of the past in contemporary indigenous rights movements, heritage management strategies and nationalist projects.

Crosslist(s): ARC, GSD, LAS, MUX
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 5
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: ANT majors only; JR/SR only; Prereq: One ANT course
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Dewey 104 Instructional Method: In-Person

Is it nature or culture that makes humans themselves? This question continues to provoke heated debates in American life, and anthropology has played a crucial role in them since Margaret Mead’s groundbreaking account of her 1925 fieldwork on Samoan adolescents. The stakes for understanding the nature/culture dichotomy are high, as this course assesses human impacts on the environment, how new reproductive technologies reconfigure family relations or how race is a cultural not a biological construct. In a workshop setting, anthropology majors develop a portfolio of public writing as they contribute to contemporary conversations about the nature/culture divide. Cannot be taken S/U. Prerequisites: course work in Anthropology. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and senior Anthropology majors only. Instructor permission required. (E)


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 5 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 6
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: ARA 100
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 8:00 AM - 9:15 AM / Neilson 108F Instructional Method: In-Person

This course is a continuation of Elementary Arabic I. Emphasis is on integrated development of all four language skills--reading, writing, speaking and listening. By the end of this semester, students should have the language skills necessary for everyday interactions, be able to communicate in a variety of situations, and read and write about a broad variety of familiar topics. In addition to textbook exercises and group work, students write short essays, give oral and video presentations and participate in role-play activities. Prerequisites: ARA 100 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 18.

Credits: 5 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 14
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: ARA 100
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Neilson 108F Instructional Method: In-Person

This course is a continuation of Elementary Arabic I. Emphasis is on integrated development of all four language skills--reading, writing, speaking and listening. By the end of this semester, students should have the language skills necessary for everyday interactions, be able to communicate in a variety of situations, and read and write about a broad variety of familiar topics. In addition to textbook exercises and group work, students write short essays, give oral and video presentations and participate in role-play activities. Prerequisites: ARA 100 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 18.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 6
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: ARA 200
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Dewey 104 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course is a continuation of Intermediate Arabic I. Students continue honing their knowledge of Arabic using an approach designed to strengthen communication skills. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient proficiency to understand most routine social demands and non-technical conversations, as well as discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence at a general professional level. An increasing vocabulary enables students to read prose with a near-normal range of speed and write on a broad variety of topics, including news, politics, economics, history and Arab cultures. Prerequisite: ARA 200 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 18.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 5
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Dewey 104 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course helps students reach advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arab history, literature and current events. The course focuses on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course covers Al-Kitaab, Book 3, units 5-10 in addition to extra instructional materials. Prerequisite: ARA 300, or the completion of Al-Kitaab, Book 3, lessons 1-5, or the equivalent. Students must be able to use formal spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom. Enrollment limited to 18.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 11
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Historical Studies
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer 103 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course explores how art and architecture have profoundly shaped visual experiences and shifting understandings of the past and present. Featuring different case studies, each section includes work with original objects, site visits and writings about art. Unifying themes include: (1) materials, techniques and the patterns deployed to create space; (2) the design, function and symbolism of images and monuments; (3) artistic production and its relation to individual and institutional patronage, religion, politics and aesthetics; (4) issues turning on artists’ fame versus anonymity and uniqueness versus reproducibility; and (5) cross-cultural exchanges. Enrollment limited to 25.

Crosslist(s): MUX
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 26
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 3
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Historical Studies
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM / Hillyer 103 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course explores how art and architecture have profoundly shaped visual experiences and shifting understandings of the past and present. Featuring different case studies, each section includes work with original objects, site visits and writings about art. Unifying themes include: (1) materials, techniques and the patterns deployed to create space; (2) the design, function and symbolism of images and monuments; (3) artistic production and its relation to individual and institutional patronage, religion, politics and aesthetics; (4) issues turning on artists’ fame versus anonymity and uniqueness versus reproducibility; and (5) cross-cultural exchanges. Enrollment limited to 25.

Crosslist(s): MUX
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 63
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Historical Studies
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Seelye 106 Instructional Method: In-Person

Offered as CLS 217 and ARH 217. This course is a contextual examination of the art and architecture of Ancient Greece, from the end of the Bronze Age through the domination of Greece by Rome (ca. 1100-168 BCE) and handles an array of settlements, cemeteries and ritual sites. It tracks the development of the Greek city-state and the increasing power of the Greeks in the Mediterranean, culminating in the major diaspora of Greek culture accompanying the campaigns of Alexander the Great and his followers. The course takes a broadly chronological approach, and the question of a unified Greek culture is stressed. Continuing archaeological work is considered.

Crosslist(s): ARC, ART, MUX
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 43
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Historical Studies
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Hillyer Graham Instructional Method: In-Person

This course examines intersections of art and medicine from the late 18th century to the present. Considering a variety of texts and objects, from wax medical models and public health posters to Mona Hatoum’s cell-like sculptures and photographic coverage of the 2014 Ebola epidemic, the course disentangles how medical understandings of the body filter into artistic production and popular thought and vice versa. While course material is primarily from Europe and the United States, the course attends to the ways medical imaginings of the body engage with imperialism and geopolitical boundaries, as well as race, gender, ability, class and sexuality. (E)

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 7
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: ARH 290 Limit
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Historical Studies
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM / Hillyer L19 Instructional Method: In-Person

A survey of the genre from its beginnings in the political and artistic avant-garde movements of Europe at the turn of the 20th century through contemporary American conceptual bookworks. In particular, the course examines the varieties of form and expression used by book artists and the relationships between these artists and the sociocultural, literary and graphic environments from which they emerged. In addition to extensive hands-on archival work in the library’s Mortimer Rare Book Room and the museum’s Selma Erving Collection of Livres d’Artistes, students read extensively in the literature of artistic manifestos and of semiotics, focusing on those critics who have explored the complex relationship of word and image. Enrollment limited to 18. Group B

Crosslist(s): BKX, MUX
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 21
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: ARH 290 Limit
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Historical Studies
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM; Monday | 1:40 PM - 2:55 PM / Hillyer 103 Instructional Method: In-Person

This class examines current issues in contemporary art, suggested by critical debates and significant exhibitions. The class is particularly interested in practices and debates that offer the following: analyses of the global condition of art; demonstrations of the influence of new technologies; reflections on institutional frameworks; excavations of earlier art-historical moments; and accounts of the shifting status of art, artists and audiences in the contemporary public sphere. Prerequisite: One 200-level art history course, or equivalent.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 10
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: ARH 290 Limit
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Historical Studies
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 7:00 PM - 8:15 PM / Hillyer 103 Instructional Method: In-Person

Characteristic forms and the ritual, social, political, economic and cultural significance of the built environment in Europe and the Americas. Capital cities (among them Amsterdam, Berlin, Florence, Karlsruhe, London, Madrid, Mannheim, Paris, Rome, St. Petersburg, Stockholm and Washington, D.C.); colonial cities (among them Boston, Cuzco and Philadelphia) communities founded by the religiously persecuted or the religiously inspired; garrison towns; industrial towns; urban infrastructure (streets, squares, provisioning of water and other utilities, public transportation, and public amenities); garden design in England, France and Italy; Utopian thought and planning; and city vs. country. Counts for ARU. Prerequisite: ARH 110 recommended. Enrollment limited to 20.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 12
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: ARH 290 Limit
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Historical Studies
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer 103 Instructional Method: In-Person

Many ancient Roman houses and tombs belonged to freed slaves who had established themselves and their families in the world. Assessed through the lens of elite authors who disparaged freed people, these monuments have often been judged as lesser, imperfectly emulating lost aristocratic models. On the contrary, as a close reading of these houses and tombs themselves demonstrate, freedmen and freedwomen celebrated their transformation from being things to being persons of means by finding visual means to celebrate their industry, their wealth, their ambition and their identification with mythological figures who had once been enslaved. Enrollment limited to 20.

Crosslist(s): ANS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 18
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: ARH 290 Limit
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Historical Studies
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 7:00 PM - 8:15 PM / Hillyer 109 Instructional Method: In-Person

How should ancient East Asian painting and calligraphy, created primarily with ink and brush, be read? What were the typical themes and styles? Who were the artists and their audiences? Why did they venerate certain works of art over others? To answer these questions, this course examines masterpieces of Chinese painting and calligraphy from the Six Dynasties (220-589) to the Yuan Dynasty (1279-1368). This course includes a few studio sessions to give students basic hands-on experience with ink and brush. Enrollment limited to 20.

Crosslist(s): EAL
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 13
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Historical Studies
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Hillyer 109 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course studies the ethics of return, focusing on collections of belongings made under colonial conditions. Across the 2000s, hundreds of artifacts, artworks, ancestral creations and animal (including human) bodies have been repatriated. But what does it mean to “return” belongings taken—indeed, often stolen—in the colonial past? What, really, can repatriation accomplish? Is reparation a better option, and what might it entail? Drawing examples from a wide range of geographies, and highlighting recent—especially decolonial—scholarship, the course debates these issues. Open to students in any discipline. Pre-req: one class in the visual arts, archaeology, anthropology, museum studies or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 8
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only; Prereqs: ARH 110, ARH 190 & two 200-level courses in ARH
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Historical Studies
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Hillyer 109 Instructional Method: In-Person

The capstone provides students with an opportunity to reflect on their path through the major, to develop projects that grow out of and synthesize their previous coursework. It enables students to have an overview of things achieved and to showcase their competence in an area of focus in planning for their futures. The class is designed to support the challenge of conceptualizing and developing individual projects: weekly class meetings will provide scaffolding for student progress. In the collaborative workshop space of the class, students share their projects in stages, which are discussed and edited by their peers. Prerequisites: ARH 110, ARH 190 and at least two 200-leve ARH courses. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 14
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 10
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM; Monday | 1:40 PM - 4:20 PM / Hillyer 218 Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to the use of digital media in the context of contemporary art practice. Students explore content development and design principles through a series of projects involving text, still image and moving image. This class involves critical discussions of studio projects in relation to contemporary art and theory. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 14. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required. This course is a permissions course, meaning all students are initially placed on the waitlist. Please read the course description to ensure you meet the listed prerequisites (if any). During November/April registration: The instructor will review the class roster and be in touch about enrollment once all students have had a chance to waitlist. There is nothing else you need to do in the meantime. Please do not submit a course waiver unless requested. During add/drop (Sept/Jan): You may register to the waitlist and contact the instructor about attending the first day of class. If you receive permission to take the course, you should submit a Course Eligibility Waiver.     

Crosslist(s): ATC
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 14
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 9
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer 218 Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to the use of digital media in the context of contemporary art practice. Students explore content development and design principles through a series of projects involving text, still image and moving image. This class involves critical discussions of studio projects in relation to contemporary art and theory. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 14. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required. This course is a permissions course, meaning all students are initially placed on the waitlist. Please read the course description to ensure you meet the listed prerequisites (if any). During November/April registration: The instructor will review the class roster and be in touch about enrollment once all students have had a chance to waitlist. There is nothing else you need to do in the meantime. Please do not submit a course waiver unless requested. During add/drop (Sept/Jan): You may register to the waitlist and contact the instructor about attending the first day of class. If you receive permission to take the course, you should submit a Course Eligibility Waiver.     

Crosslist(s): ATC
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 16
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 1
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer 203 Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to visual experience through a study of the basic elements of drawing. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 18. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required. This course is a permissions course, meaning all students are initially placed on the waitlist. Please read the course description to ensure you meet the listed prerequisites (if any). During November/April registration: The instructor will review the class roster and be in touch about enrollment once all students have had a chance to waitlist. There is nothing else you need to do in the meantime. Please do not submit a course waiver unless requested. During add/drop (Sept/Jan): You may register to the waitlist and contact the instructor about attending the first day of class. If you receive permission to take the course, you should submit a Course Eligibility Waiver.     

Crosslist(s): LSS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 17
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM; Monday | 1:40 PM - 4:20 PM / Hillyer 203 Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to visual experience through a study of the basic elements of drawing. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 18. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required. This course is a permissions course, meaning all students are initially placed on the waitlist. Please read the course description to ensure you meet the listed prerequisites (if any). During November/April registration: The instructor will review the class roster and be in touch about enrollment once all students have had a chance to waitlist. There is nothing else you need to do in the meantime. Please do not submit a course waiver unless requested. During add/drop (Sept/Jan): You may register to the waitlist and contact the instructor about attending the first day of class. If you receive permission to take the course, you should submit a Course Eligibility Waiver.     

Crosslist(s): LSS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 9
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 2
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Hillyer 203 Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to visual experience through a study of the basic elements of drawing. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 18. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required. This course is a permissions course, meaning all students are initially placed on the waitlist. Please read the course description to ensure you meet the listed prerequisites (if any). During November/April registration: The instructor will review the class roster and be in touch about enrollment once all students have had a chance to waitlist. There is nothing else you need to do in the meantime. Please do not submit a course waiver unless requested. During add/drop (Sept/Jan): You may register to the waitlist and contact the instructor about attending the first day of class. If you receive permission to take the course, you should submit a Course Eligibility Waiver.     

Crosslist(s): LSS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 9
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer 203 Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to visual experience through a study of the basic elements of drawing. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 18. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required. This course is a permissions course, meaning all students are initially placed on the waitlist. Please read the course description to ensure you meet the listed prerequisites (if any). During November/April registration: The instructor will review the class roster and be in touch about enrollment once all students have had a chance to waitlist. There is nothing else you need to do in the meantime. Please do not submit a course waiver unless requested. During add/drop (Sept/Jan): You may register to the waitlist and contact the instructor about attending the first day of class. If you receive permission to take the course, you should submit a Course Eligibility Waiver.     

Crosslist(s): LSS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 7
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 1
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer 204 Instructional Method: In-Person

This cross-disciplinary studio course involves two-dimensional, three-dimensional and time-based approaches. Students are introduced to a range of conceptual and practical frameworks for making and thinking about art. This course is strongly recommended for students considering the art major. By emphasizing visual thinking, risk-taking and critical reflection, this course also has relevance for other disciplines. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Priority given to first years. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required. This course is a permissions course, meaning all students are initially placed on the waitlist. Please read the course description to ensure you meet the listed prerequisites (if any). During November/April registration: The instructor will review the class roster and be in touch about enrollment once all students have had a chance to waitlist. There is nothing else you need to do in the meantime. Please do not submit a course waiver unless requested. During add/drop (Sept/Jan): You may register to the waitlist and contact the instructor about attending the first day of class. If you receive permission to take the course, you should submit a Course Eligibility Waiver.     

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 13
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer 205 Instructional Method: In-Person

This cross-disciplinary studio course involves two-dimensional, three-dimensional and time-based approaches. Students are introduced to a range of conceptual and practical frameworks for making and thinking about art. This course is strongly recommended for students considering the art major. By emphasizing visual thinking, risk-taking and critical reflection, this course also has relevance for other disciplines. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Priority given to first years. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required. This course is a permissions course, meaning all students are initially placed on the waitlist. Please read the course description to ensure you meet the listed prerequisites (if any). During November/April registration: The instructor will review the class roster and be in touch about enrollment once all students have had a chance to waitlist. There is nothing else you need to do in the meantime. Please do not submit a course waiver unless requested. During add/drop (Sept/Jan): You may register to the waitlist and contact the instructor about attending the first day of class. If you receive permission to take the course, you should submit a Course Eligibility Waiver.     

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 12
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Hillyer 205 Instructional Method: In-Person

This cross-disciplinary studio course involves two-dimensional, three-dimensional and time-based approaches. Students are introduced to a range of conceptual and practical frameworks for making and thinking about art. This course is strongly recommended for students considering the art major. By emphasizing visual thinking, risk-taking and critical reflection, this course also has relevance for other disciplines. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Priority given to first years. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required. This course is a permissions course, meaning all students are initially placed on the waitlist. Please read the course description to ensure you meet the listed prerequisites (if any). During November/April registration: The instructor will review the class roster and be in touch about enrollment once all students have had a chance to waitlist. There is nothing else you need to do in the meantime. Please do not submit a course waiver unless requested. During add/drop (Sept/Jan): You may register to the waitlist and contact the instructor about attending the first day of class. If you receive permission to take the course, you should submit a Course Eligibility Waiver.     

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 10
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM; Monday | 1:40 PM - 4:20 PM / Capen Annex Instructional Method: In-Person

Offered as IDP 200 and ARS 200. This course explores speculative design practices as a way to collaboratively envision radical social transformation. The course focuses on imagining worlds without capitalism, building on local Solidarity Economy efforts. Students work in small groups to make these visions tangible through stories, installations, performances and models of everyday objects from the future. Students learn to make iteratively as a process of critical thinking, analyze how designed things reaffirm or resist the hegemonic power of capitalism and evaluate project work based on its ability to provoke questions and connect with viewers. Prerequisites: 100-level studio art course or IDP 116 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 16. (E)

Crosslist(s): ART
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 19
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 4
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Hillyer 211 Instructional Method: In-Person

Various spatial and pictorial concepts are investigated through the oil medium. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Prerequisite: ARS 163 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 18. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required. This course is a permissions course, meaning all students are initially placed on the waitlist. Please read the course description to ensure you meet the listed prerequisites (if any). During November/April registration: The instructor will review the class roster and be in touch about enrollment once all students have had a chance to waitlist. There is nothing else you need to do in the meantime. Please do not submit a course waiver unless requested. During add/drop (Sept/Jan): You may register to the waitlist and contact the instructor about attending the first day of class. If you receive permission to take the course, you should submit a Course Eligibility Waiver.     

Crosslist(s): LSS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 12
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 6
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Hillyer L08 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course is an in-depth introduction to the expressive potential of the printed image and the distinct visual and tactile qualities of etching and drypoint. The class explores how prints can function as social devices, manifestations of texture and opportunities for collaboration. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Prerequisite: ARS 163 or ARS 172, or equivalent. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 11
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 1
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer 212 Instructional Method: In-Person

(1) Investigates the structure of the book as a form; (2) provides a brief history of the Latin alphabet and how it is shaped calligraphically and constructed geometrically; (3) studies traditional and non-traditional typography; and (4) practices the composition of metal type by hand and the printing of composed type on the SP-15 printing presses. A voluntary introduction to digital typography is also offered outside class. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required. This course is a permissions course, meaning all students are initially placed on the waitlist. Please read the course description to ensure you meet the listed prerequisites (if any). During November/April registration: The instructor will review the class roster and be in touch about enrollment once all students have had a chance to waitlist. There is nothing else you need to do in the meantime. Please do not submit a course waiver unless requested. During add/drop (Sept/Jan): You may register to the waitlist and contact the instructor about attending the first day of class. If you receive permission to take the course, you should submit a Course Eligibility Waiver.     

Crosslist(s): BKX
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 15
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 5
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer L08 Instructional Method: In-Person

Relief printing from carved woodblocks can create images that range from precise and delicate to raw and expressionistic. It is a direct and flexible process that allows for printing on a variety of materials at large and small scales. Students use both ancient and contemporary technologies to produce black and white and color prints from single and multiple blocks. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Prerequisite: ARS 163 or ARS 172, or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required. This course is a permissions course, meaning all students are initially placed on the waitlist. Please read the course description to ensure you meet the listed prerequisites (if any). During November/April registration: The instructor will review the class roster and be in touch about enrollment once all students have had a chance to waitlist. There is nothing else you need to do in the meantime. Please do not submit a course waiver unless requested. During add/drop (Sept/Jan): You may register to the waitlist and contact the instructor about attending the first day of class. If you receive permission to take the course, you should submit a Course Eligibility Waiver.   

Crosslist(s): BKX
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 11
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer 106 Instructional Method: In-Person

This studio probes the material, organizational and spatial qualities of the line architecture’s most fundamental element. Through iterative and digital processes which engage light and air as their main references, students integrate drawing and making to construct and reconstruct lines in both virtual and physical space, and in two and three dimensions. Materialization of digital processes is tested through multiple full-scale, physical models. Through the act of making and remaking constructed lines, students oscillate between intuitive and critical modes of thinking, while further developing foundation-level design skills including analytic drawing, digital fabrication, and issues relating to scale and site specificity. Students may require additional supplies and are responsible for purchasing them directly. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: ARS 280 or equivalent. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required. This course is a permissions course, meaning all students are initially placed on the waitlist. Please read the course description to ensure you meet the listed prerequisites (if any). During November/April registration: The instructor will review the class roster and be in touch about enrollment once all students have had a chance to waitlist. There is nothing else you need to do in the meantime. Please do not submit a course waiver unless requested. During add/drop (Sept/Jan): You may register to the waitlist and contact the instructor about attending the first day of class. If you receive permission to take the course, you should submit a Course Eligibility Waiver.     

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 12
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 3
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM; Monday | 1:40 PM - 4:20 PM / Hillyer 320 Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to visual experience through a study of the basic elements of photography as an expressive medium. Each section involves either black and white or a combination of darkroom and digital processes. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: ARS 162 or ARS 172 or equivalent. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required. This course is a permissions course, meaning all students are initially placed on the waitlist. Please read the course description to ensure you meet the listed prerequisites (if any). During November/April registration: The instructor will review the class roster and be in touch about enrollment once all students have had a chance to waitlist. There is nothing else you need to do in the meantime. Please do not submit a course waiver unless requested. During add/drop (Sept/Jan): You may register to the waitlist and contact the instructor about attending the first day of class. If you receive permission to take the course, you should submit a Course Eligibility Waiver.     

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 14
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 9
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: ARS 162
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Mathematics
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer 320 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course emphasizes individual and collaborative projects in computer-based interactive multimedia production. Participants extend their individual experimentation with time-based processes and development of media production skills (3D animation, video and audio production) developed in the context of interactive multimedia production for performance, installation or internet. Critical examination and discussion of contemporary examples of new media art augment this studio course. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Prerequisite: ARS 162. Enrollment limited to 14. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required. This course is a permissions course, meaning all students are initially placed on the waitlist. Please read the course description to ensure you meet the listed prerequisites (if any). During November/April registration: The instructor will review the class roster and be in touch about enrollment once all students have had a chance to waitlist. There is nothing else you need to do in the meantime. Please do not submit a course waiver unless requested. During add/drop (Sept/Jan): You may register to the waitlist and contact the instructor about attending the first day of class. If you receive permission to take the course, you should submit a Course Eligibility Waiver.     

Crosslist(s): ATC
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 17
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer L03 Instructional Method: In-Person

Painting from models, still life and landscape using varied techniques and conceptual frameworks. Students may require additional supplies and are responsible for purchasing them directly. Prerequisites: ARS 266. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required. This course is a permissions course, meaning all students are initially placed on the waitlist. Please read the course description to ensure you meet the listed prerequisites (if any). During November/April registration: The instructor will review the class roster and be in touch about enrollment once all students have had a chance to waitlist. There is nothing else you need to do in the meantime. Please do not submit a course waiver unless requested. During add/drop (Sept/Jan): You may register to the waitlist and contact the instructor about attending the first day of class. If you receive permission to take the course, you should submit a Course Eligibility Waiver.     

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 9
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM; Monday | 1:40 PM - 4:20 PM / Hillyer 204 Instructional Method: In-Person

In this course, the class creates and critically interrogates socially engaged art. The focus is the subset of those practices that originate and gain power from remembering events of the past. Formats include site interventions, community collaborations, performance, traditional studio practices or intersections of these. The processes and physical forms of the (art) works complicate boundaries between art and education, art and sociology, and art and activism. The course is organized as a laboratory/workshop to experiment with ideas and forms of socially engaged art. At the same time, students discuss (aesthetic and participant impact) rubrics for these projects and analyze their efficacy. Students may require additional materials and are responsible for purchasing them directly. Prerequisite: One 4-credit studio art course. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required. This course is a permissions course, meaning all students are initially placed on the waitlist. Please read the course description to ensure you meet the listed prerequisites (if any). During November/April registration: The instructor will review the class roster and be in touch about enrollment once all students have had a chance to waitlist. There is nothing else you need to do in the meantime. Please do not submit a course waiver unless requested. During add/drop (Sept/Jan): You may register to the waitlist and contact the instructor about attending the first day of class. If you receive permission to take the course, you should submit a Course Eligibility Waiver. 

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 6
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer L04 Instructional Method: In-Person

Advanced problems in sculpture using bronze casting, welding and various media. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Prerequisites: ARS 273. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required. This course is a permissions course, meaning all students are initially placed on the waitlist. Please read the course description to ensure you meet the listed prerequisites (if any). During November/April registration: The instructor will review the class roster and be in touch about enrollment once all students have had a chance to waitlist. There is nothing else you need to do in the meantime. Please do not submit a course waiver unless requested. During add/drop (Sept/Jan): You may register to the waitlist and contact the instructor about attending the first day of class. If you receive permission to take the course, you should submit a Course Eligibility Waiver. 

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 14
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 12
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 1
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: ARS 384 Limit
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer 218 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course explores the possibilities of photography, expanding its boundaries in relation to sculpture, moving image, technology and installation. Structured in four sections, students respond to assignments within each section and work on an independent final project. Possible areas of studio exploration include darkroom and digital production, camera-less processes, moving image and installation. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. This course can be repeated once for credit with a different topic. Enrollment limited to 14. Prerequisite: ARS 282. Instructor permission required. (E)


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required. This course is a permissions course, meaning all students are initially placed on the waitlist. Please read the course description to ensure you meet the listed prerequisites (if any). During November/April registration: The instructor will review the class roster and be in touch about enrollment once all students have had a chance to waitlist. There is nothing else you need to do in the meantime. Please do not submit a course waiver unless requested. During add/drop (Sept/Jan): You may register to the waitlist and contact the instructor about attending the first day of class. If you receive permission to take the course, you should submit a Course Eligibility Waiver.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 14
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 13
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Burton 406 Instructional Method: In-Person

Offered as LSS 389 and ARS 389. This class is for students who have taken introductory landscape studios and are interested in exploring more sophisticated projects. It is also for architecture and urbanism majors who have a strong interest in landscape architecture or urban design. In a design studio format, the students analyze and propose interventions for the built environment on a broad scale, considering multiple factors (including ecological, economic, political, sociological and historical) in their engagement of the site. The majority of the semester is spent working on one complex project. Students use digital tools as well as traditional design media and physical model building within a liberal arts-based conceptual studio that encourages extensive research and in-depth theoretic inquiry. Previous studio experience and two architecture or landscape studies courses suggested. Priority given to LSS minors and ARU majors. Enrollment limited to 14. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Crosslist(s): ART, ENV, LSS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 19
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: ARS majors only; SR only
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Hillyer 320 Instructional Method: In-Person

This one-semester capstone course is required of senior and junior (completing in fall semester) Plan B majors. Students create work in media of their choice and develop the skills necessary for presenting a cohesive exhibition of their work at the end of their final semester, as required by the Plan B major. Course material includes installation or distribution techniques for different media, curation of small exhibitions of each others’ work, and development of critical discourse skills through reading, writing and speaking assignments. In addition to studio faculty, Smith museum staff may occasionally present topics of conceptual and/or practical interest. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Senior ARS Majors only.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 4
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies
Time/Location: Wednesday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Seelye 310 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course brings together a cohort of archives concentrators and other advanced students to explore contemporary issues at the intersection of archives and public history. The readings focus on case studies and the challenges in preservation, access and interpretation of archival materials. The class analyzes how these materials become part of a meaningful and usable past for general audiences while taking into account the dynamics of national and collective identity formation, trauma, memorialization, social justice, and the changing digital landscape in the fields of public history and cultural heritage work. Enrollment limited to 15. Juniors and seniors only.

Crosslist(s): AMS, HST
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 21
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / McConnell 406 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course explores the astronomical roots of clocks and calendars, and relies on both real and simulated observations of the Sun, Moon and stars. In addition to completing weekly projects based on collecting and interpreting data, students independently research a clock and a calendar from another culture, either ancient or modern. There are no prerequisites, and students from all disciplines and backgrounds are welcome. Enrollment limited to 25.

Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 21
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM / McConnell 406 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course explores the astronomical roots of clocks and calendars, and relies on both real and simulated observations of the Sun, Moon and stars. In addition to completing weekly projects based on collecting and interpreting data, students independently research a clock and a calendar from another culture, either ancient or modern. There are no prerequisites, and students from all disciplines and backgrounds are welcome. Enrollment limited to 25.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 22
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 3
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: Not AST 103
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday | 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM / McConnell 406 Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to observational astronomy for students who have taken or are currently taking a physical science class. Become proficient using the telescopes of the McConnell Rooftop observatory to observe celestial objects, including the Moon, the Sun, the planets, stars, nebulae and galaxies. Learn celestial coordinate and time-keeping systems. Find out how telescopes and digital cameras work. Take digital images of celestial objects and learn basic techniques of digital image processing. Become familiar with measuring and classification techniques in observational astronomy. Not open to students who have taken AST 103. Enrollment limited to 20.


All seats reserved for AST Majors. Others may waitlist.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 16
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: AST 100, 111 or 228
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday/Friday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM; Monday | 3:05 PM - 4:20 PM / McConnell 406 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course introduces the computational, statistical and data visualization techniques essential
to research and further coursework in astronomy and other STEM majors. Students learn how to use the Python programming language to analyze and manipulate data; how to create, interpret and present visualizations of those data; and how to apply statistical analysis techniques to astronomical data. Students use real databases from major international observatories spanning a variety of research areas, e.g., star properties across the galaxy, exoplanet discoveries, deep surveys of distant galaxies, asteroids and comets in the solar system, and more. Prerequisites: AST 100, AST 111 or AST 228; CSC 110 or equivalent recommended. Enrollment limited to 25.

Crosslist(s): SDS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 20
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 3
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science, Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / McConnell 406 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course explores the intersection of physical science, social science, psychology, politics and the environment. How do scientists, decision makers and the public communicate with each other, and how can scientists do better at it? What should the role of scientists be in advocacy and social movements? How does scientific information influence lifestyle and behavior choices among the public at large? The course focuses on three topics with close ties to astronomy: (1) global climate change, which involves basic atmospheric physics; (2) light pollution, which wastes billions of dollars per year and ruins our view of the starry sky without providing the safety it promises; and (3) controversial development of mountaintop observations such as the Thirty Meter Telescope on Mauna Kea, HI. Throughout the course students develop science communication skills using proven techniques borrowed from theater. Prerequisite: one college science course in any field and MTH 111 or the equivalent.

Crosslist(s): PPL
Credits: 3 Max Enrollment: 78
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 84
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: BIO 202 & CHM 223/223L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Seelye 106 Instructional Method: In-Person

Structure and function of biological macromolecules: proteins and nucleic acids. Mechanisms of conformational change and cooperative activity; and bioenergetics, enzymes and regulation. Prerequisites: BIO 202 and CHM 223. Corequisite: BCH 253 is required for biochemistry majors.

Crosslist(s): CHM
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 12
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BCH 252 - Biochem I:Structure & Function Enforced Requirements: BIO 203
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:10 PM - 5:00 PM / Ford 220 Instructional Method: In-Person

Techniques of modern biochemistry: ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, western blot and mass spectroscopy. Prerequisite: BIO 203. Corequisite: BCH 252. Enrollment limited to 12.

Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 10
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 1
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BCH 252 - Biochem I:Structure & Function Enforced Requirements: BIO 203
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:10 PM - 5:00 PM / Ford 220 Instructional Method: In-Person

Techniques of modern biochemistry: ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, western blot and mass spectroscopy. Prerequisite: BIO 203. Corequisite: BCH 252. Enrollment limited to 12.

Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 11
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BCH 252 - Biochem I:Structure & Function Enforced Requirements: BIO 203
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday | 1:30 PM - 5:20 PM / Ford 220 Instructional Method: In-Person

Techniques of modern biochemistry: ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, western blot and mass spectroscopy. Prerequisite: BIO 203. Corequisite: BCH 252. Enrollment limited to 12.

Credits: 3 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 13
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BCH 336 - Physical Chem Bio Systems Lab Enforced Requirements: BCH 252 & (CHM 118 or CHM 224)
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Sabin-Reed 224 Instructional Method: In-Person

The course focuses on the tools and methods used to study the physical chemistry of biological systems. Discussions include thermodynamics and equilibria, solution properties, enzyme kinetics and membrane transport processes. Prerequisite: BCH 252 and (CHM 118 or CHM 224). Corequisite: BCH 336 is required for biochemistry majors.

Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 13
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BCH 335 - Physical Chem Biochem Systems Enforced Requirements: BCH 252 & (CHM 118 or CHM 224)
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Friday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 220 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course emphasizes the tools and methods used to study the physical chemistry of biological systems. The laboratory focuses on the applications of experimental techniques in elucidating the principles of biochemical systems. Prerequisite: BCH 252 and (CHM 118 or CHM 224). Corequisite: BCH 335.

Credits: 3 Max Enrollment: 45
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 47
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 5
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: BIO 123 - Hort: Botany for Gardeners Lab Enforced Requirements: Permission Required
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Seelye 201 Instructional Method: In-Person

Survey course in the fundamentals of horticulture and basic botany. Plant structure and function, nomenclature, nutrition, seed biology, propagation, pests and diseases, soils, compost, and an introduction to biotechnology. Discussions include growing fruits, vegetables and herbs. Course requirements include a field notebook, in-class discussions, independent engagement with written and multimedia resources, and a book review. Corequisite: BIO 123. Enrollment limited to 45.

Crosslist(s): LSS
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 16
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 2
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: BIO 122 - Hort: Botany for Gardeners
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Lyman 111 Instructional Method: In-Person

Practical lab experiences in plant propagation, morphology, development and physiology, soils, seeds, floral design, and an herbal apothecary. Use of the Lyman Conservatory, field trips, and winter and spring observation of outdoor plants are important components of the course. Course requirements include a lab journal and an extended field observation phenology project. Corequisite: BIO 122. Enrollment limited to 15.

Crosslist(s): LSS
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 15
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 3
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: BIO 122 - Hort: Botany for Gardeners
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Lyman 111 Instructional Method: In-Person

Practical lab experiences in plant propagation, morphology, development and physiology, soils, seeds, floral design, and an herbal apothecary. Use of the Lyman Conservatory, field trips, and winter and spring observation of outdoor plants are important components of the course. Course requirements include a lab journal and an extended field observation phenology project. Corequisite: BIO 122. Enrollment limited to 15.

Crosslist(s): LSS
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 16
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 3
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: BIO 122 - Hort: Botany for Gardeners
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Friday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Lyman 111 Instructional Method: In-Person

Practical lab experiences in plant propagation, morphology, development and physiology, soils, seeds, floral design, and an herbal apothecary. Use of the Lyman Conservatory, field trips, and winter and spring observation of outdoor plants are important components of the course. Course requirements include a lab journal and an extended field observation phenology project. Corequisite: BIO 122. Enrollment limited to 15.

Crosslist(s): LSS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 60
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 61
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Ford 240 Instructional Method: In-Person

Students in this course investigate the origin, nature and importance of the diversity of life on Earth, key ecological processes and interactions that create and maintain communities and ecosystems, principle threats to biodiversity, and emerging conservation strategies to protect the elements and processes upon which we depend. Throughout the semester, the course emphasizes the relevance of diversity and ecological studies in conservation. Corequisite: BIO 131 is recommended but not required.

Crosslist(s): ENV, LSS
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 21
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 2
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 220 Instructional Method: In-Person

Students in this course investigate the origin, nature and importance of the diversity of life on Earth, key ecological processes and interactions that create and maintain communities and ecosystems, principle threats to biodiversity, and emerging conservation strategies to protect the elements and processes upon which we depend. Throughout the semester, the course emphasizes the relevance of diversity and ecological studies in conservation. Corequisite: BIO 131 is recommended but not required. Discussion enrollment limited to 20.

Crosslist(s): ENV, LSS
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 23
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 2
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 220 Instructional Method: In-Person

Students in this course investigate the origin, nature and importance of the diversity of life on Earth, key ecological processes and interactions that create and maintain communities and ecosystems, principle threats to biodiversity, and emerging conservation strategies to protect the elements and processes upon which we depend. Throughout the semester, the course emphasizes the relevance of diversity and ecological studies in conservation. Corequisite: BIO 131 is recommended but not required. Discussion enrollment limited to 20.

Crosslist(s): ENV, LSS
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 17
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Friday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 220 Instructional Method: In-Person

Students in this course investigate the origin, nature and importance of the diversity of life on Earth, key ecological processes and interactions that create and maintain communities and ecosystems, principle threats to biodiversity, and emerging conservation strategies to protect the elements and processes upon which we depend. Throughout the semester, the course emphasizes the relevance of diversity and ecological studies in conservation. Corequisite: BIO 131 is recommended but not required.

Crosslist(s): ENV, LSS
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 14
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday | 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM / Sabin-Reed 223 Instructional Method: In-Person

Students pull on their boots and explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens and local hemlock forests. Students gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis and presentation of results. Because research projects vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. Corequisite: BIO 130 recommended. (E)

Crosslist(s): ENV, LSS
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 15
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 223 Instructional Method: In-Person

Students pull on their boots and explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens and local hemlock forests. Students gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis and presentation of results. Because research projects vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. Corequisite: BIO 130 recommended. (E)

Crosslist(s): ENV, LSS
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 8
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 223 Instructional Method: In-Person

Students pull on their boots and explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens and local hemlock forests. Students gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis and presentation of results. Because research projects vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. Corequisite: BIO 130 recommended. (E)

Crosslist(s): ENV, LSS
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 12
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 223 Instructional Method: In-Person

Students pull on their boots and explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens and local hemlock forests. Students gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis and presentation of results. Because research projects vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. Corequisite: BIO 130 recommended. (E)

Crosslist(s): ENV, LSS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 78
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 69
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Young Basement Instructional Method: In-Person

Students in this course investigate the structure, function and physiology of cells; the properties of biological molecules; information transfer from the level of DNA to cell-cell communication; and cellular energy generation and transfer. The development of multicellular organisms and the physiology of selected organ systems is also explored. In addition to attending lectures, each student participates in discussion sections that focus on data analysis and interpretation while integrating mechanisms across scales. Corequisite: BIO 133 recommended but not required. Enrollment limited to 78.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 24
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 24
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 325 Instructional Method: In-Person

Students in this course investigate the structure, function and physiology of cells; the properties of biological molecules; information transfer from the level of DNA to cell-cell communication; and cellular energy generation and transfer. The development of multicellular organisms and the physiology of selected organ systems is also explored. In addition to attending lectures, each student participates in discussion sections that focus on data analysis and interpretation while integrating mechanisms across scales. Corequisite: BIO 133 recommended but not required. Discussion enrollment limited to 24.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 24
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 17
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 4:10 PM - 5:25 PM / Sabin-Reed 325 Instructional Method: In-Person

Students in this course investigate the structure, function and physiology of cells; the properties of biological molecules; information transfer from the level of DNA to cell-cell communication; and cellular energy generation and transfer. The development of multicellular organisms and the physiology of selected organ systems is also explored. In addition to attending lectures, each student participates in discussion sections that focus on data analysis and interpretation while integrating mechanisms across scales. Corequisite: BIO 133 recommended but not required. Discussion enrollment limited to 24.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 24
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 18
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 325 Instructional Method: In-Person

Students in this course investigate the structure, function and physiology of cells; the properties of biological molecules; information transfer from the level of DNA to cell-cell communication; and cellular energy generation and transfer. The development of multicellular organisms and the physiology of selected organ systems is also explored. In addition to attending lectures, each student participates in discussion sections that focus on data analysis and interpretation while integrating mechanisms across scales. Corequisite: BIO 133 recommended but not required. Discussion enrollment limited to 24.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 24
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 10
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 4:10 PM - 5:25 PM / Sabin-Reed 325 Instructional Method: In-Person

Students in this course investigate the structure, function and physiology of cells; the properties of biological molecules; information transfer from the level of DNA to cell-cell communication; and cellular energy generation and transfer. The development of multicellular organisms and the physiology of selected organ systems is also explored. In addition to attending lectures, each student participates in discussion sections that focus on data analysis and interpretation while integrating mechanisms across scales. Corequisite: BIO 133 recommended but not required. Discussion enrollment limited to 24.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 17
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 132 - Molecules, Cells & Systems
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 328 Instructional Method: In-Person

This Laboratory Course introduces students to biological discovery and the biological research process. Students gain hands-on experience with the use of modern biological research methods by participating in ongoing research with a variety of organisms. This includes scientific discovery, hypothesis development, data collection and analysis, as well as presentation of discoveries and results. Research projects vary with each Instructor. Corequisite: BIO 132.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 20
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 132 - Molecules, Cells & Systems
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 328 Instructional Method: In-Person

This Laboratory Course introduces students to biological discovery and the biological research process. Students gain hands-on experience with the use of modern biological research methods by participating in ongoing research with a variety of organisms. This includes scientific discovery, hypothesis development, data collection and analysis, as well as presentation of discoveries and results. Research projects vary with each Instructor. Corequisite: BIO 132.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 19
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 132 - Molecules, Cells & Systems
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 328 Instructional Method: In-Person

This Laboratory Course introduces students to biological discovery and the biological research process. Students gain hands-on experience with the use of modern biological research methods by participating in ongoing research with a variety of organisms. This includes scientific discovery, hypothesis development, data collection and analysis, as well as presentation of discoveries and results. Research projects vary with each Instructor. Corequisite: BIO 132.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 19
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 132 - Molecules, Cells & Systems
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Friday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 328 Instructional Method: In-Person

This Laboratory Course introduces students to biological discovery and the biological research process. Students gain hands-on experience with the use of modern biological research methods by participating in ongoing research with a variety of organisms. This includes scientific discovery, hypothesis development, data collection and analysis, as well as presentation of discoveries and results. Research projects vary with each Instructor. Corequisite: BIO 132.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 3 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 20
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 205 - Microbiology Lab
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Burton 209 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course examines bacterial morphology, growth, biochemistry, genetics and methods of controlling bacterial activities. Emphasis is on bacterial physiology and the role of the prokaryotes in their natural habitats. The course also covers viral life cycles and diseases caused by viruses. Prerequisites: BIO 132 and CHM 111 or equivalent advanced placement courses. Corequisite: BIO 205.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 13
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 204 - Microbiology
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 122 Instructional Method: In-Person

Experiments in this course explore the morphology, physiology, biochemistry and genetics of bacteria using a variety of bacterial genera. Methods of aseptic technique, isolation, identification and growth of bacteria are learned. An individual project is completed at the end of the term. Corequisite: BIO 204. Enrollment limited to 16

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 8
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 204 - Microbiology
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 122 Instructional Method: In-Person

Experiments in this course explore the morphology, physiology, biochemistry and genetics of bacteria using a variety of bacterial genera. Methods of aseptic technique, isolation, identification and growth of bacteria are learned. An individual project is completed at the end of the term. Corequisite: BIO 204. Enrollment limited to 16.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 15
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 3
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 207 - Plant Physiology Lab
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Lyman 111 Instructional Method: In-Person

How do plants work? This course explores key processes in plant physiology and how these processes interact with the (changing) environment. Key concepts include photosynthesis/carbon sequestration, water and nutrient uptake and transport, growth and carbon allocation, and plant-soil interactions. The course encourages students to think about these processes in an environmental justice context e.g. food justice, urban tree resilience and natural climate solutions. Corequisite: BIO 207. Prerequisites: A course in ecology, organismal biology or environmental science.

Crosslist(s): BCH, ENV
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 15
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 3
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 206 - Plant Physiology
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:20 PM - 5:00 PM / Lyman 111 Instructional Method: In-Person

This laboratory is both a survey of plant physiological techniques and a course-based research experience in plant physiological research. Field trips are taken to MacLeish Field Station and experiments are conducted in Lyman Plant House. Students gain hands-on experience with sophisticated instrumentation and techniques used to measure micro-climate, plant-water relations and gas exchange (photosynthetic rate and respiration). Corequisite: BIO 206.

Crosslist(s): ENV
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 96
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: BIO 130 or 132
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Stoddard G2 Instructional Method: In-Person

An exploration of genomes and genes that highlights the connections between molecular biology, genetics, cell biology and evolution. Students analyze the principal experimental findings that serve as the basis for the current understanding of topics in genetics (such as DNA, RNA and protein structure and function, gene organization and networks, gene expression and regulation, and the origins and evolution of molecular mechanisms). Students examine the computational tools and rapidly expanding databases that have advanced contemporary biology. Prerequisites: BIO 130 or BIO 132 or equivalent. Corequisite: BIO 231 recommended.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 34
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: BIO 130 or 132
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 8:25 AM - 9:15 AM / Young Basement Instructional Method: In-Person

An exploration of genomes and genes that highlights the connections between molecular biology, genetics, cell biology and evolution. Students analyze the principal experimental findings that serve as the basis for the current understanding of topics in genetics (such as DNA, RNA and protein structure and function, gene organization and networks, gene expression and regulation, and the origins and evolution of molecular mechanisms). Students examine the computational tools and rapidly expanding databases that have advanced contemporary biology. Corequisite: BIO 231 recommended. Prerequisites: BIO 130 or BIO 132 or equivalent. Discussion enrollment limited to 30.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 31
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: BIO 130 or 132
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM / Young Basement Instructional Method: In-Person

An exploration of genomes and genes that highlights the connections between molecular biology, genetics, cell biology and evolution. Students analyze the principal experimental findings that serve as the basis for the current understanding of topics in genetics (such as DNA, RNA and protein structure and function, gene organization and networks, gene expression and regulation, and the origins and evolution of molecular mechanisms). Students examine the computational tools and rapidly expanding databases that have advanced contemporary biology. Corequisite: BIO 231 recommended. Prerequisites: BIO 130 or BIO 132 or equivalent. Discussion enrollment limited to 30.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 30
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: BIO 130 or 132
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Friday | 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM / Seelye 106 Instructional Method: In-Person

An exploration of genomes and genes that highlights the connections between molecular biology, genetics, cell biology and evolution. Students analyze the principal experimental findings that serve as the basis for the current understanding of topics in genetics (such as DNA, RNA and protein structure and function, gene organization and networks, gene expression and regulation, and the origins and evolution of molecular mechanisms). Students examine the computational tools and rapidly expanding databases that have advanced contemporary biology. Corequisite: BIO 231 recommended. Prerequisites: BIO 130 or BIO 132 or equivalent. Discussion enrollment limited to 30.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 17
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 230 - Genomes & Genetic Analysis
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday | 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM / Ford 120 Instructional Method: In-Person

A laboratory designed to give students an introduction to genomics and the molecular biology of genetics. Students gain experience with a variety of classical and modern techniques used in human genetic analysis and several experiments using students' DNA are performed throughout the semester. Laboratory and computer-based projects include PCR, restriction analysis and DNA sequencing as well as contemporary bioinformatics and genome database analyses. Corequisite: BIO 230. Enrollment limited to 16.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 18
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 1
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 230 - Genomes & Genetic Analysis
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 120 Instructional Method: In-Person

A laboratory designed to give students an introduction to genomics and the molecular biology of genetics. Students gain experience with a variety of classical and modern techniques used in human genetic analysis and several experiments using students' DNA are performed throughout the semester. Laboratory and computer-based projects include PCR, restriction analysis and DNA sequencing as well as contemporary bioinformatics and genome database analyses. Corequisite: BIO 230. Enrollment limited to 16.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 16
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 230 - Genomes & Genetic Analysis
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 120 Instructional Method: In-Person

A laboratory designed to give students an introduction to genomics and the molecular biology of genetics. Students gain experience with a variety of classical and modern techniques used in human genetic analysis and several experiments using students' DNA are performed throughout the semester. Laboratory and computer-based projects include PCR, restriction analysis and DNA sequencing as well as contemporary bioinformatics and genome database analyses. Corequisite: BIO 230. Enrollment limited to 16.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 17
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 1
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 230 - Genomes & Genetic Analysis
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 120 Instructional Method: In-Person

A laboratory designed to give students an introduction to genomics and the molecular biology of genetics. Students gain experience with a variety of classical and modern techniques used in human genetic analysis and several experiments using students' DNA are performed throughout the semester. Laboratory and computer-based projects include PCR, restriction analysis and DNA sequencing as well as contemporary bioinformatics and genome database analyses. Corequisite: BIO 230. Enrollment limited to 16.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 3 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 17
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 261 - Invertebrate Diversity Lab
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Sabin-Reed 325 Instructional Method: In-Person

Invertebrate animals account for the vast majority of species on earth. Although sometimes inconspicuous, invertebrates are vital members of ecological communities. They provide protein, important ecosystem services, biomedical and biotechnological products, and aesthetic value to humans. Today, many invertebrate populations are threatened by human activities. This course surveys the extraordinary diversity and importance of invertebrates, emphasizing their form and function in ecological and evolutionary contexts. Corequisite: BIO 261. Enrollment limited to 20.

Crosslist(s): ENV, MSC
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 17
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 260 - Invertebrate Diversity
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 201 Instructional Method: In-Person

This laboratory examines relationships between invertebrate form and function and compares diversity within and among major body plans using live and preserved material. Students observe and document invertebrate structure, life cycles, locomotion, feeding and other behaviors. Corequisite: BIO 260. Enrollment limited to 20.

Crosslist(s): ENV
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 6
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Sabin-Reed 205 Instructional Method: In-Person

A review of the evolutionary origins, adaptations and trends in the biology of vertebrates. Corequisite: BIO 273 is recommended but not required. No Prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 25.

Crosslist(s): ENV
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 6
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 205 Instructional Method: In-Person

A largely anatomical exploration of the evolutionary origins, adaptations and trends in the biology of vertebrates. Corequisite: BIO 272. Enrollment limited to 20.

Crosslist(s): ENV
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 8
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM; Monday | 1:40 PM - 2:55 PM / McConnell 403 Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to the immune system covering the molecular, cellular and genetic bases of immunity to infectious agents. Discussions include immunodeficiencies, transplantation, allergies, immunopathology and immunotherapies. Prerequisite: BIO 202, BIO 204 or BIO 230. Corequisite: BIO 307 recommended.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 2
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 306 - Immunology
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 122 Instructional Method: In-Person

The use of immunological techniques in clinical diagnosis and as research tools. Experimental exercises include immune cell population analysis, immunofluorescence, Western blotting, ELISA and agglutination reactions. An independent project is completed at the end of the term. Corequisite: BIO 306. Enrollment limited to 16.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 24
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 240 Instructional Method: In-Person

Advanced molecular biology of eukaryotes and their viruses (including coronavirus, Ebola and HIV). Discussions include genomics, bioinformatics, eukaryotic gene organization, regulation of gene expression, RNA processing, retroviruses, transposable elements, gene rearrangement, methods for studying human genes and genetic diseases, CRISPR, molecular biology of infectious diseases, genome projects and whole genome analysis. Reading assignments are from the primary literature. Each student presents an in-class presentation and writes a paper on a topic selected in consultation with the instructor. Corequisite: BIO 333 strongly recommended. Prerequisite: BIO 230 or BIO 232. Enrollment limited to 20.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 14
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 332 - Molecular Biolog of Eukaryotes
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday | 1:40 PM - 4:20 PM / Ford 122 Instructional Method: In-Person

A laboratory course designed to complement the lecture material in BIO 332. Advanced techniques used to study the molecular biology of eukaryotes are learned in the context of a semester-long project. These methods include techniques for studying genomics and gene expression including: CRISPR, RNA interference, DNA sequence analysis, RT-PCR, genomics, bioinformatics and others. Corequisite: BIO 332. Prerequisite: BIO 231. Enrollment limited to 16.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 3 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 14
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Burton 219 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course focuses on methods and approaches in the emerging fields of bioinformatics and molecular evolution. Discussions include the quantitative examination of genetic variation, selective and stochastic forces shaping proteins and catalytic RNA data mining, comparative analysis of whole genome data sets, comparative genomics and bioinformatics, and hypothesis testing in computational biology. The course explores the role of bioinformatics and comparative methods in the fields of molecular medicine, drug design and in systematic, conservation and population biology. Corequisite: BIO 335 strongly recommended but not required. Prerequisite: BIO 132, BIO 230, BIO 232, or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20.

Crosslist(s): SDS
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 10
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 334 - Bioinformat & Comp Molecul Bio
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Seelye 306 Instructional Method: In-Person

This lab introduces the computational and quantitative tools underlying contemporary bioinformatics. Students explore the various approaches to phylogenetic reconstruction using molecular data, methods of data mining in genome databases, comparative genomics, structure-function modeling and the use of molecular data to reconstruct population and evolutionary history. Students are encouraged to explore datasets of particular interest to them. Corequisite: BIO 334 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20.

Credits: 3 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 20
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Burton 209 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course focuses on the origin and diversification of microorganisms, with emphasis on eukaryotic lineages. The first weeks of lecture cover the origin of life on Earth and the diversification of bacteria and archaea. From there, students focus on the diversification of eukaryotes, examining the many innovations that mark some of the major clades of eukaryotes. Evaluation is based on a combination of class participation, short writings and an independent research paper. Prerequisite: BIO 230 or BIO 232, or equivalent. Corequisite: BIO 371 is strongly recommended but not required.

Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 12
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 370 - Microbial Diversity
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 314 Instructional Method: In-Person

This research-based lab allows students to explore the eukaryotic microbiomes associated with various environments on campus, including the greenhouse and marine aquaria. Students in the course master the basics of light microscopy, PCR and analyses of high-throughput sequencing data. Students also use the scanning electron microscope to survey their communities. The work in the course culminates in a poster presentation on the discoveries of the semester. Corequisite: BIO 370. Enrollment limited to 18.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 15
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 373 - Quantitative Ecology Lab Enforced Requirements: (BIO 130/131, BIO 266/267, BIO 268/269 or BIO 364/365) & (SDS 201 or SDS 220)
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Bass 102 Instructional Method: In-Person

An advanced course covering ecological modeling and data analysis. Students explore the principles of mathematical modeling to describe population dynamics and species interactions. Students also learn modern analytical approaches in the study of ecological communities and ecological experiments. In addition to theoretical quantitative foundations, students acquire the analytical skills to implement mathematical and statistical models using the R computing language. Corequisite: BIO 373. Prerequisites: BIO 130/BIO 131, BIO 266/BIO 267, BIO 268/BIO 269 or BIO 364/BIO 365 and SDS 201 or SDS 220, or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20.

Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 14
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 372 - Colq: Quantitativ Ecology
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 224 Instructional Method: In-Person

An advanced, applied course on ecological population modeling and data analysis. Students implement mathematical models describing population dynamics and species interactions as well as modern analytical approaches commonly applied to ecological data using the R computing language. Throughout this course students acquire skills in data analysis, data visualization, data management, code, reproducibility and modeling. Corequisite: BIO 372. Enrollment limited to 20.

Credits: 5 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 6
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 8:25 AM - 9:15 AM / Hatfield 104 Instructional Method: In-Person

A continuation of CHI 110. Students extend and develop confidence in all four communicative skills, culminating in a creative digital project. Prerequisite: CHI 110 or by placement test. Enrollment limited to 15.

Credits: 5 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 3
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM / Hatfield 104 Instructional Method: In-Person

A continuation of CHI 110. Students extend and develop confidence in all four communicative skills, culminating in a creative digital project. Prerequisite: CHI 110 or by placement test. Enrollment limited to 15.

Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 3
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 8:25 AM - 9:15 AM / Hatfield 104 Instructional Method: In-Person

A continuation of CHI 110. Students extend and develop confidence in all four communicative skills, culminating in a creative digital project. Prerequisite: CHI 110 or by placement test. Enrollment limited to 15.

Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 6
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM / Hatfield 104 Instructional Method: In-Person

A continuation of CHI 110. Students extend and develop confidence in all four communicative skills, culminating in a creative digital project. Prerequisite: CHI 110 or by placement test. Enrollment limited to 15.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 8
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM / Hatfield 203 Instructional Method: In-Person

This continuation of CHI 120 is designed for students with previous Chinese language experience who have at least an Intermediate Low oral proficiency and a Novice High reading and writing proficiency. The course covers the same material as CHI 111 at an accelerated pace, focusing on helping students build grammar knowledge and reading and writing skills through interactive, communicative and task-based activities. CHI 120 and CHI 121 together fulfill the foreign language requirement for Latin honors. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: CHI 120 or placement test.

Credits: 5 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 10
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 8:25 AM - 9:15 AM / Hatfield 203 Instructional Method: In-Person

A continuation of CHI 220. Students transition from functional communication skills to expressing and supporting opinions about topics including modernization, health, the environment and economics, ending by creating a digital narrative exploring a culturally or socially significant topic. Prerequisite: CHI 220 or by placement test. Enrollment limited to 15.

Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 8
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 6
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 8:25 AM - 9:15 AM / Hatfield 203 Instructional Method: In-Person

A continuation of CHI 220. Students transition from functional communication skills to expressing and supporting opinions about topics including modernization, health, the environment and economics, ending by creating a digital narrative exploring a culturally or socially significant topic. Prerequisite: CHI 220 or by placement test. Enrollment limited to 15.

Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 7
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 4
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM / Hatfield 203 Instructional Method: In-Person

A continuation of CHI 220. Students transition from functional communication skills to expressing and supporting opinions about topics including modernization, health, the environment and economics, ending by creating a digital narrative exploring a culturally or socially significant topic. Prerequisite: CHI 220 or by placement test. Enrollment limited to 15.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 4
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 10:50 AM - 11:40 AM / Hatfield 104 Instructional Method: In-Person

A continuation of CHI 301, with a focus on developing narrative and storytelling skills, cultural knowledge, and increased use of authentic language materials. Projects include, but are not limited to, blog posts, podcasts and magazines. Prerequisite: CHI 301 or by placement test. Enrollment limited to 15.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 8
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Hatfield 104 Instructional Method: In-Person

Development of advanced proficiency in four skills through the study and discussion of selected modern Chinese literary and cinematic texts. Students explore literary and formal expression in original works, including fiction, short stories, prose, novellas and screenplays. With the instructor’s permission, advanced language courses may be repeated when the content changes. Prerequisite: CHI 302 or by placement test.

Crosslist(s): TSX
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 16
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 4
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: CHM 100 Limit
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM / Sabin-Reed 325 Instructional Method: In-Person

In this museum-based course, chemistry is discussed in the context of art. The course focuses on materials used by artists and how the chemistry of these materials influences their longevity. Current analytical methods as well as preservation and conservation practices are discussed along with examples from the Smith College Museum of Art. Enrollment limited to 16.

Crosslist(s): MUX
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 28
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM; Monday | 1:40 PM - 2:55 PM / Young Basement Instructional Method: In-Person

Offered as CHM 108 and ENV 108. An introduction to environmental chemistry, applying chemical concepts to topics such as acid rain, greenhouse gases, air quality, pesticides and waste treatment. Chemical concepts are developed as needed.

Crosslist(s): CHM, ENV, MSC
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 55
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 53
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 15
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 222L - Chm II Lab: Organic Chemistry Enforced Requirements: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Young Basement Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to the theory and practice of organic chemistry. The course focuses on structure, nomenclature, physical and chemical properties of organic compounds and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for structural analysis. Reactions of carbonyl compounds and alkenes are studied in depth. Prerequisite: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L. Corequisite: CHM 222L. Multiple sections are offered at different times. At the time of registration, students must register for both a lecture (CHM 222) and a lab (CHM 222L) section that fit their course schedule.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 55
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 52
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 222L - Chm II Lab: Organic Chemistry Enforced Requirements: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 8:00 AM - 9:15 AM / Seelye 106 Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to the theory and practice of organic chemistry. The course focuses on structure, nomenclature, physical and chemical properties of organic compounds and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for structural analysis. Reactions of carbonyl compounds and alkenes are studied in depth. Prerequisite: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L. Corequisite: CHM 222L. Multiple sections are offered at different times. At the time of registration, students must register for both a lecture (CHM 222) and a lab (CHM 222L) section that fit their course schedule.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 55
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 50
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 222L - Chm II Lab: Organic Chemistry Enforced Requirements: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / McConnell 103 Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to the theory and practice of organic chemistry. The course focuses on structure, nomenclature, physical and chemical properties of organic compounds and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for structural analysis. Reactions of carbonyl compounds and alkenes are studied in depth. Prerequisite: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L. Corequisite: CHM 222L. Multiple sections are offered at different times. At the time of registration, students must register for both a lecture (CHM 222) and a lab (CHM 222L) section that fit their course schedule.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 17
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 222 - Chm II:Organic Chemistry Enforced Requirements: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday | 1:40 PM - 4:20 PM / Ford 223 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab section for Organic Chemistry. An introduction to the theory and practice of organic chemistry. The course focuses on structure, nomenclature, physical and chemical properties of organic compounds and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for structural analysis. Reactions of carbonyl compounds and alkenes are studied in depth. Corequisite: CHM 222. Prerequisite: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L. Enrollment limited to 16. Multiple sections are offered at different times. At the time of registration, students must register for both a lecture (CHM 222) and a lab (CHM 222L) section that fit their course schedule.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 15
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 222 - Chm II:Organic Chemistry Enforced Requirements: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday | 1:40 PM - 4:20 PM / Ford 226 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab section for Organic Chemistry. An introduction to the theory and practice of organic chemistry. The course focuses on structure, nomenclature, physical and chemical properties of organic compounds and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for structural analysis. Reactions of carbonyl compounds and alkenes are studied in depth. Corequisite: CHM 222. Prerequisite: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L. Enrollment limited to 16. Multiple sections are offered at different times. At the time of registration, students must register for both a lecture (CHM 222) and a lab (CHM 222L) section that fit their course schedule.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 15
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 222 - Chm II:Organic Chemistry Enforced Requirements: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 223 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab section for Organic Chemistry. An introduction to the theory and practice of organic chemistry. The course focuses on structure, nomenclature, physical and chemical properties of organic compounds and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for structural analysis. Reactions of carbonyl compounds and alkenes are studied in depth. Corequisite: CHM 222. Prerequisite: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L. Enrollment limited to 16. Multiple sections are offered at different times. At the time of registration, students must register for both a lecture (CHM 222) and a lab (CHM 222L) section that fit their course schedule.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 15
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 222 - Chm II:Organic Chemistry Enforced Requirements: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 226 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab section for Organic Chemistry. An introduction to the theory and practice of organic chemistry. The course focuses on structure, nomenclature, physical and chemical properties of organic compounds and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for structural analysis. Reactions of carbonyl compounds and alkenes are studied in depth. Corequisite: CHM 222. Prerequisite: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L. Enrollment limited to 16. Multiple sections are offered at different times. At the time of registration, students must register for both a lecture (CHM 222) and a lab (CHM 222L) section that fit their course schedule.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 16
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 222 - Chm II:Organic Chemistry Enforced Requirements: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 223 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab section for Organic Chemistry. An introduction to the theory and practice of organic chemistry. The course focuses on structure, nomenclature, physical and chemical properties of organic compounds and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for structural analysis. Reactions of carbonyl compounds and alkenes are studied in depth. Corequisite: CHM 222. Prerequisite: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L. Enrollment limited to 16. Multiple sections are offered at different times. At the time of registration, students must register for both a lecture (CHM 222) and a lab (CHM 222L) section that fit their course schedule.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 16
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 3
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 222 - Chm II:Organic Chemistry Enforced Requirements: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 223 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab section for Organic Chemistry. An introduction to the theory and practice of organic chemistry. The course focuses on structure, nomenclature, physical and chemical properties of organic compounds and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for structural analysis. Reactions of carbonyl compounds and alkenes are studied in depth. Corequisite: CHM 222. Prerequisite: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L. Enrollment limited to 16. Multiple sections are offered at different times. At the time of registration, students must register for both a lecture (CHM 222) and a lab (CHM 222L) section that fit their course schedule.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 16
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 1
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 222 - Chm II:Organic Chemistry Enforced Requirements: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 226 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab section for Organic Chemistry. An introduction to the theory and practice of organic chemistry. The course focuses on structure, nomenclature, physical and chemical properties of organic compounds and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for structural analysis. Reactions of carbonyl compounds and alkenes are studied in depth. Corequisite: CHM 222. Prerequisite: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L. Enrollment limited to 16. Multiple sections are offered at different times. At the time of registration, students must register for both a lecture (CHM 222) and a lab (CHM 222L) section that fit their course schedule.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 13
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 222 - Chm II:Organic Chemistry Enforced Requirements: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Friday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 223 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab section for Organic Chemistry. An introduction to the theory and practice of organic chemistry. The course focuses on structure, nomenclature, physical and chemical properties of organic compounds and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for structural analysis. Reactions of carbonyl compounds and alkenes are studied in depth. Corequisite: CHM 222. Prerequisite: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L. Enrollment limited to 16. Multiple sections are offered at different times. At the time of registration, students must register for both a lecture (CHM 222) and a lab (CHM 222L) section that fit their course schedule.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 16
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 222 - Chm II:Organic Chemistry Enforced Requirements: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Friday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 226 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab section for Organic Chemistry. An introduction to the theory and practice of organic chemistry. The course focuses on structure, nomenclature, physical and chemical properties of organic compounds and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for structural analysis. Reactions of carbonyl compounds and alkenes are studied in depth. Corequisite: CHM 222. Prerequisite: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L. Enrollment limited to 16. Multiple sections are offered at different times. At the time of registration, students must register for both a lecture (CHM 222) and a lab (CHM 222L) section that fit their course schedule.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 13
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 222 - Chm II:Organic Chemistry Enforced Requirements: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Ford 223 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab section for Organic Chemistry. An introduction to the theory and practice of organic chemistry. The course focuses on structure, nomenclature, physical and chemical properties of organic compounds and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for structural analysis. Reactions of carbonyl compounds and alkenes are studied in depth. Corequisite: CHM 222. Prerequisite: CHM 111/111L, CHM 114/114L or CHM 118/118L. Enrollment limited to 16. Multiple sections are offered at different times. At the time of registration, students must register for both a lecture (CHM 222) and a lab (CHM 222L) section that fit their course schedule.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 80
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 61
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 224L - Chem IV Lab: Intro Inorg &Phys Enforced Requirements: CHM 111/111L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Stoddard G2 Instructional Method: In-Person

This final course in the chemistry core sequence provides a foundation in the principles of physical and inorganic chemistry that are central to the study of all chemical phenomena. Discussions include quantitative treatment of thermochemistry, chemical equilibria, electrochemistry and reaction kinetics. Corequisite: CHM 224L. Prerequisites: CHM 111/111L or equivalent. MTH 111 recommended but not required. Enrollment limited to 80.

Crosslist(s): BCH, MUX
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 16
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 1
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 224 - Chem IV:Intro Inorg & Phys Chm Enforced Requirements: CHM 111/111L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday | 1:40 PM - 4:20 PM / Ford 326 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab section. This final course in the chemistry core sequence provides a foundation in the principles of physical and inorganic chemistry that are central to the study of all chemical phenomena. Discussions include quantitative treatment of thermochemistry, chemical equilibria, electrochemistry and reaction kinetics. Corequisite: CHM 224. Prerequisites: CHM 111/111L or equivalent. MTH 111 recommended but not required. Enrollment limited to 16.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 13
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 224 - Chem IV:Intro Inorg & Phys Chm Enforced Requirements: CHM 111/111L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Ford 326 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab section. This final course in the chemistry core sequence provides a foundation in the principles of physical and inorganic chemistry that are central to the study of all chemical phenomena. Discussions include quantitative treatment of thermochemistry, chemical equilibria, electrochemistry and reaction kinetics. Corequisite: CHM 224. Prerequisites: CHM 111/111L or equivalent. MTH 111 recommended but not required. Enrollment limited to 16.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 17
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 224 - Chem IV:Intro Inorg & Phys Chm Enforced Requirements: CHM 111/111L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 326 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab section. This final course in the chemistry core sequence provides a foundation in the principles of physical and inorganic chemistry that are central to the study of all chemical phenomena. Discussions include quantitative treatment of thermochemistry, chemical equilibria, electrochemistry and reaction kinetics. Corequisite: CHM 224. Prerequisites: CHM 111/111L or equivalent. MTH 111 recommended but not required. Enrollment limited to 16.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 14
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 224 - Chem IV:Intro Inorg & Phys Chm Enforced Requirements: CHM 111/111L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 326 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab section. This final course in the chemistry core sequence provides a foundation in the principles of physical and inorganic chemistry that are central to the study of all chemical phenomena. Discussions include quantitative treatment of thermochemistry, chemical equilibria, electrochemistry and reaction kinetics. Corequisite: CHM 224. Prerequisites: CHM 111/111L or equivalent. MTH 111 recommended but not required. Enrollment limited to 16.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 14
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: CHM 223/223L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Ford 323 Instructional Method: In-Person

Synthetic techniques and experimental design in the context of multistep synthesis. The literature of chemistry, methods of purification and characterization with a focus on NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and chromatography. Prerequisite: CHM 223. Enrollment limited to 18.

Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 14
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: CHM 223/223L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:20 PM - 5:00 PM / Ford 323 Instructional Method: In-Person

Synthetic techniques and experimental design in the context of multistep synthesis. The literature of chemistry, methods of purification and characterization with a focus on NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and chromatography. Prerequisite: CHM 223. Enrollment limited to 18.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 19
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: CHM 223/223L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday/Friday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM / Bass 204 Instructional Method: In-Person

Applications of chemical tools and synthetic molecules to the study of biological systems. Emphasis is on emerging strategies to study living systems at the molecular level, primary scientific literature and critical review of manuscripts. Discussions include biorthogonal chemistry, synthetic small-molecule probes to interrogate biological systems, protein engineering, proteomics, advances in DNA sequencing, genomics, directed evolution and natural product biosynthesis. Prerequisite: CHM 223. Enrollment limited to 18.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 5 Max Enrollment: 24
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 26
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: (CHM 118/118L or 224/224L) & MTH 112
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Seelye 312 Instructional Method: In-Person

Thermodynamics and kinetics: will the contents of this flask react, and if so, how fast? Explores the properties that govern the chemical and physical behavior of macroscopic collections of atoms and molecules (gases, liquids, solids and mixtures thereof). Prerequisites: CHM 118 or CHM 224, and MTH 112. Enrollment limited to 24.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 14
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: (CHM 118/118L or 224/224L) & MTH 112
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday | 1:40 PM - 4:20 PM / Ford 320 Instructional Method: In-Person

Thermodynamics and kinetics: will the contents of this flask react, and if so, how fast? Explores the properties that govern the chemical and physical behavior of macroscopic collections of atoms and molecules (gases, liquids, solids and mixtures thereof). Prerequisites: CHM 118 or CHM 224, and MTH 112. Enrollment limited to 12.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 12
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: (CHM 118/118L or 224/224L) & MTH 112
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Friday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 320 Instructional Method: In-Person

Thermodynamics and kinetics: will the contents of this flask react, and if so, how fast? Explores the properties that govern the chemical and physical behavior of macroscopic collections of atoms and molecules (gases, liquids, solids and mixtures thereof). Prerequisites: CHM 118 or CHM 224, and MTH 112. Enrollment limited to 12.

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 14
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 1
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: CHM 222/222L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Ford 322 Instructional Method: In-Person

The interaction of light with molecules is central to studies of molecular structure and reactivity. This course builds on students’ understanding of molecular structure from the core sequence (CHM 111-224) to show how many types of light can be used to interrogate molecules and to shed some light on their behavior. The combined classroom/laboratory format allows students to explore light-based instruments in short, in-class exercises as well as in longer, more traditional labs. The course culminates with an independent project that allows students to explore some of the ways light is used in cutting-edge chemical research. Prerequisites: CHM 222 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20.

Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 10
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 8
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: CHM 222/222L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:20 PM - 5:00 PM / Ford 320 Instructional Method: In-Person

The interaction of light with molecules is central to studies of molecular structure and reactivity. This course builds on students’ understanding of molecular structure from the core sequence (CHM 111-224) to show how many types of light can be used to interrogate molecules and to shed some light on their behavior. The combined classroom/laboratory format allows students to explore light-based instruments in short, in-class exercises as well as in longer, more traditional labs. The course culminates with an independent project that allows students to explore some of the ways light is used in cutting-edge chemical research. Prerequisites: CHM 222 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 10.

Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 10
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 6
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 1
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: CHM 222/222L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:20 PM - 5:00 PM / Ford 320 Instructional Method: In-Person

The interaction of light with molecules is central to studies of molecular structure and reactivity. This course builds on students’ understanding of molecular structure from the core sequence (CHM 111-224) to show how many types of light can be used to interrogate molecules and to shed some light on their behavior. The combined classroom/laboratory format allows students to explore light-based instruments in short, in-class exercises as well as in longer, more traditional labs. The course culminates with an independent project that allows students to explore some of the ways light is used in cutting-edge chemical research. Prerequisites: CHM 222 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 12
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM / Seelye 109 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course focuses on the theoretical foundations of archaeological research, the variety of methods available to analyze material culture, the interpretation of results, and ethical considerations of practicing archaeology in the United States and abroad. The course provides students with a solid foundation for evaluating and contextualizing current methodological and theoretical trends within archaeology. Case studies illustrate the diversity of archaeological thought, interdisciplinary approaches to studying material culture and innovative directions in the field of anthropological archaeology. Discussions of practice address the roles and responsibilities of archaeologists in heritage management, museum development and community outreach.

Crosslist(s): ARC, LSS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 25
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / Hillyer 103 Instructional Method: In-Person

Architectural, sculpted and pictorial arts from North of the Alps, c. 1150-1300. Rather than a survey, this course proposes a thematic approach to allow for an in-depth examination of key concerns of the Gothic era, such as the interface between visual creations and new forms of patronage and devotional attitudes, the rise in literacy and secular culture, the development of scientific rationality, or the sustained contact with the Islamic world. Counts for ARU

Crosslist(s): MED
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 29
Grade Mode: Credit/Non Credit Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Time/Location: Tuesday | 2:45 PM - 4:25 PM / Seelye 106 Instructional Method: In-Person

Offered as ARX 120, BKX 120 and MUX 120. This course serves as a shared gateway for the Archives, Book Studies and Museums concentrations. Students explore histories, futures and systems of knowledge production, preservation, organization and distribution through the kinds of objects and evidence held by archives, libraries and museums. As evidence of their evolving and complex operations, this course introduces the history of such institutions, their evolving public mission, issues central to their work today, and the creation and uses of materials they hold. The course critically engages the emergence of such institutions, specifically within this regional context and in this framework of a college campus. S/U only. Enrollment limited to 25. (E)

Crosslist(s): ARX, BKX, MUX
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 26
Grade Mode: Credit/Non Credit Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Time/Location: Thursday | 2:45 PM - 4:25 PM / Seelye 106 Instructional Method: In-Person

Offered as ARX 120, BKX 120 and MUX 120. This course serves as a shared gateway for the Archives, Book Studies and Museums concentrations. Students explore histories, futures and systems of knowledge production, preservation, organization and distribution through the kinds of objects and evidence held by archives, libraries and museums. As evidence of their evolving and complex operations, this course introduces the history of such institutions, their evolving public mission, issues central to their work today, and the creation and uses of materials they hold. The course critically engages the emergence of such institutions, specifically within this regional context and in this framework of a college campus. S/U only. Enrollment limited to 25. (E)

Crosslist(s): ARX, BKX, MUX
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 29
Grade Mode: Credit/Non Credit Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Time/Location: Tuesday | 2:45 PM - 4:25 PM / Seelye 106 Instructional Method: In-Person

Offered as ARX 120, BKX 120 and MUX 120. This course serves as a shared gateway for the Archives, Book Studies and Museums concentrations. Students explore histories, futures and systems of knowledge production, preservation, organization and distribution through the kinds of objects and evidence held by archives, libraries and museums. As evidence of their evolving and complex operations, this course introduces the history of such institutions, their evolving public mission, issues central to their work today, and the creation and uses of materials they hold. The course critically engages the emergence of such institutions, specifically within this regional context and in this framework of a college campus. S/U only. Enrollment limited to 25. (E)

Crosslist(s): ARX, BKX, MUX
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 26
Grade Mode: Credit/Non Credit Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Time/Location: Thursday | 2:45 PM - 4:25 PM / Seelye 106 Instructional Method: In-Person

Offered as ARX 120, BKX 120 and MUX 120. This course serves as a shared gateway for the Archives, Book Studies and Museums concentrations. Students explore histories, futures and systems of knowledge production, preservation, organization and distribution through the kinds of objects and evidence held by archives, libraries and museums. As evidence of their evolving and complex operations, this course introduces the history of such institutions, their evolving public mission, issues central to their work today, and the creation and uses of materials they hold. The course critically engages the emergence of such institutions, specifically within this regional context and in this framework of a college campus. S/U only. Enrollment limited to 25. (E)

Crosslist(s): ARX, BKX, MUX
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 13
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Time/Location: Friday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer 320 Instructional Method: In-Person

Offered as BKX 203 and PYX 203. This course focuses on various professional practice aspects of publishing, including manuscript selection, book design and production, and product marketing and distribution, through Nine Syllables Press, in partnership with the Boutelle-Day Poetry Center. Students learn about the publishing industry and contemporary US poetry landscape. Students have the opportunity to learn about and practice designing professional chapbook interiors and covers, producing and marketing chapbooks for a selected manuscript from Nine Syllables Press. Cannot be taken S/U. Priority given to BKX and PYX concentrators. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor permission required. (E)


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Crosslist(s): BKX, PYX
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 15
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Seelye 105 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course provides a forum for Community Engagement and Social Change concentration students to develop research projects that synthesize their prior coursework and practical experiences. In a typical capstone project, student teams complete a collaborative project focused on imagining concrete ways out of current crises by designing and proposing innovative approaches to dismantling structures of inequality or catalyzing structures of equity. Enrollment limited to 20. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Crosslist(s): EDC
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 10
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 11
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only
Time/Location: Tuesday | 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM / McConnell 406 Instructional Method: In-Person

An immersive research experience in observational astrophysics for students who have completed AST 337. Students design an independent scientific observing program and carry it out at the WIYN 0.9m telescope on Kitt Peak, AZ in January. The rest of the semester is spent reducing and analyzing the data obtained and preparing scientific results for presentation. Professional techniques of CCD imaging, photometry, astrometry and statistical image analysis are applied using research-grade software. Possible projects include studying star formation regions and star formation histories in external galaxies, measuring ages and chemical composition of star clusters, searching for exoplanets, supernova or eclipsing binary stars. Prerequisites: AST 337. Enrollment limited to 10. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 5
Grade Mode: Credit/Non Credit Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: BIO 314 Limit
Time/Location: Friday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 411 Instructional Method: In-Person

Instrument specific course highly recommended for students interested in using state-of-the-art microscopy techniques in research (special studies, honors, SURF, etc.). Participants get exposure to basic and advanced light and electron microscopy techniques available at Smith. Mechanical and optical components are reviewed. Operational parameters for improving image quality and data collection using digital imaging and image analysis techniques are discussed. Emphasis is on the use of these exciting technologies performing quality and up-to-date research in many disciplines ranging from the live science and geology to art and engineering. Evaluation is through engagement in assigned activities. 400-level work cannot overlap with this course work. S/U only. Enrollment limited to 12.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 20
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: CHM 118/118L or CHM 224/224L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Seelye 208 Instructional Method: In-Person

Application of group theory, coordination compounds, molecular orbital theory of main group compounds and other selected topics in inorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHM 118 or CHM 224.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 63
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Historical Studies
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Seelye 106 Instructional Method: In-Person

Offered as CLS 217 and ARH 217. This course is a contextual examination of the art and architecture of Ancient Greece, from the end of the Bronze Age through the domination of Greece by Rome (ca. 1100-168 BCE) and handles an array of settlements, cemeteries and ritual sites. It tracks the development of the Greek city-state and the increasing power of the Greeks in the Mediterranean, culminating in the major diaspora of Greek culture accompanying the campaigns of Alexander the Great and his followers. The course takes a broadly chronological approach, and the question of a unified Greek culture is stressed. Continuing archaeological work is considered.

Crosslist(s): ARC, ART, MUX
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 28
Grade Mode: Credit/Non Credit Waitlist Count: 2
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: Not CSC 111
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Ford 342 Instructional Method: In-Person

A gentle introduction to designing programs (recipes) for systematically solving problems. Students learn to build programs including designing, coding, debugging, testing and documenting them. An introduction to block-structured procedural control flow including branching, iteration and functions, using primitive and simple data types (lists). Students learn the high-level internal operation of computer systems (inputs, outputs, processing and storage) and their applications. Students are exposed to the social and historical aspects of computing. This course is recommended for those who have no prior experience in computer science at the high school, AP or college level. Not open to students who have taken CSC 111. May not be taken concurrently with CSC 120. S/U only. Enrollment limited to 30.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 28
Grade Mode: Credit/Non Credit Waitlist Count: 1
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: Permission Required
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Wednesday/Friday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM; Monday | 1:40 PM - 2:55 PM / Ford 342 Instructional Method: In-Person

A gentle introduction to designing programs (recipes) for systematically solving problems. Students learn to build programs including designing, coding, debugging, testing and documenting them. An introduction to block-structured procedural control flow including branching, iteration and functions, using primitive and simple data types (lists). Students learn the high-level internal operation of computer systems (inputs, outputs, processing and storage) and their applications. Students are exposed to the social and historical aspects of computing. This course is recommended for those who have no prior experience in computer science at the high school, AP or college level. Not open to students who have taken CSC 111. May not be taken concurrently with CSC 120. S/U only. Enrollment limited to 30.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 28
Grade Mode: Credit/Non Credit Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: Permission Required
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Monday | 3:05 PM - 4:20 PM; Wednesday/Friday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 342 Instructional Method: In-Person

A gentle introduction to designing programs (recipes) for systematically solving problems. Students learn to build programs including designing, coding, debugging, testing and documenting them. An introduction to block-structured procedural control flow including branching, iteration and functions, using primitive and simple data types (lists). Students learn the high-level internal operation of computer systems (inputs, outputs, processing and storage) and their applications. Students are exposed to the social and historical aspects of computing. This course is recommended for those who have no prior experience in computer science at the high school, AP or college level. Not open to students who have taken CSC 111. May not be taken concurrently with CSC 120. S/U only. Enrollment limited to 30.