Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to some of the major perspectives, themes, and issues in the field of Africana Studies. Our focus is on the economic, social and political aspects of cultural production, and how these inform what it means to read, write about, view and listen to Black culture.

Crosslist(s): LAS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Social Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

This class uses canonical literature, as well as cultural productions and critical theory, in order to explore blackness as a modern racial formation (i.e. an idea with material consequences) and an identity. Beginning with the 19th century slave narrative tradition, and moving through the 20th and 21st centuries, we will explore how African Americans use written, sonic and visual languages to resist Eurocentric projections of otherness onto black bodies. Using theoretical frames—such as fugitive and unmoored subjectivity, demonic grounds, and the black interior—students will critically engage representational works that meditate on “blackness” not only in terms of nonbeing, but also in terms of becoming. In other words, we will treat the black imagination as a critical site of inquiry because of its construction of racialized subjectivity as varied, complex, and evolving. Examples from sonic and visual culture will be drawn from multiple sources.


AFR Capstone for 2021-2022. Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Historical Studies
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

What do Americans want? What do they fear? What is an “American”? How do we draw the line between those who belong and those who do not? How do we define citizenship, its rights and responsibilities? How do race, gender, class and other differences affect the drawing of these boundaries, and the contents of consciousness? This course introduces some of the exciting and innovative approaches to cultural analysis that have emerged over the last three decades. Students apply these methods to a variety of texts and practices (stories, movies, television shows, music, advertisements, clothes, buildings, laws, markets, bodies) in an effort to acquire the tools to become skillful readers of American culture, and to become more critical and aware as scholars and citizens. Prerequisite: AMS 201 is recommended but not required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 40
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science, Historical Studies, Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Comedy has been a primary site for enacting and contesting citizenship in the United States. This

course presents a history of comedy from the nineteenth century to the present to analyze the role of

humor in shaping racial and gender stereotypes, as well as expressions of solidarity, resistance, and joy

among marginalized groups. Case studies include blackface minstrelsy, screwball movies, stand-up

comedy, sit-coms, satirical news shows, memes, Internet trolls, and cancel culture debates. The course

applies cultural studies, affect theory, media studies, feminist studies, and critical race studies to

analyze the social, political, emotional and psychological effects of comedy.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

In this course, we will consider such questions as: What do we know and how do we know it? What knowledges count as “science”? How is knowledge culturally situated? How has “science” been central to colonialism and capitalism and what would it mean to decolonize science(s)? Is feminist science possible? We will look at key sites and situations—in media and popular culture, in science writing, in sociological accounts of science, in creation stories and traditional knowledges—in which knowledge around the categories of race, gender, sex, sexuality, sovereignty, and dis/ability are produced, contested and made meaningful. (E)

Crosslist(s): HSC, SWG
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science, Literature, Arts
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

This is a workshop class where students learn the art of reporting and crafting longform creative nonfiction by writing about the mysteries and perplexities of family—our own and others, the ones we’re born into and the ones we observe. Students probe crisis and change within the family story--along with dynamics of gender, sexuality, race, and power—by composing a series of creative nonfiction pieces that explore familial relations at ground level: an observational essay, a profile, and a longer narrative that grapples with a family drama, whether that’s a mother-daughter struggle, a buried secret, or a forgotten history. Students read family stories by virtuosos of the form—among them, Vivian Gornick, Jeanette Winterson, Audre Lorde, Maxine Hong Kingston, J.R. Ackerley—and master the fundaments of interviewing, structure, voice, style, and ethics.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Crosslist(s): AMS, ENG
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: FY/SO only
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

This course explores the similarities and differences in the cultural patterning of human experience, compares economic, political, religious and family structures in Africa, the Americas, Asia and Oceania and analyzes the impact of the modern world on traditional societies. Several ethnographic films are viewed in coordination with descriptive case studies. Limited to first-year students and sophomores. Enrollment limited to 25.

Crosslist(s): ENV
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: FY/SO only
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

This course explores the similarities and differences in the cultural patterning of human experience, compares economic, political, religious and family structures in Africa, the Americas, Asia and Oceania and analyzes the impact of the modern world on traditional societies. Several ethnographic films are viewed in coordination with descriptive case studies. Limited to first-year students and sophomores. Enrollment limited to 25.

Crosslist(s): ENV
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: FY/SO only
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science, Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Offered as ANT 135 and ARC 135. This course studies past cultures and societies through their material remains and explores how archaeologists use different field methods, analytical technique and theoretical approaches to investigate, reconstruct and learn from the past. Data from settlement surveys, site excavations and artifact analysis are used to address economic, social, political and ideological questions across time and space. This course is taught from an anthropological perspective, exploring key transitions in human prehistory, including the origins of food production, social inequality and state-level societies across the globe. Relevance of archaeological practice in modern political, economic and social contexts is explored. Limited to first-year students and sophomores. Enrollment limited to 30.

Crosslist(s): ARC, HSC
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: ANT Major only
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

This course introduces students to the variety of methods of inquiry used for research in anthropology. Throughout the semester, students are introduced to methods of locating and analyzing information and sources, developing research questions and writing. Normally taken in the spring of the sophomore or junior year. Prerequisite: 130 and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20 anthropology majors.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

This course is a general introduction to anthropological analysis of politics and the political. Through a broad survey of anthropological texts and theories, we explore what an ethnographic perspective can offer to our understandings of power and government. Special emphasis is placed on the role of culture, symbols and social networks in the political life of local communities. Examples are drawn from a number of case studies in Africa, East Asia, Latin America and the United States, and range in scale from studies of local politics in small-scale societies to analyses of nationalism and political performance in modern nation-states. Enrollment limited to 30.

Crosslist(s): LAS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Social Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Sage 215 Instructional Method: In-Person

Offered as MUS 258 and ANT 258. This course analyzes cultural performances as sites for the expression and formation of social identity. Students study various performance genres such as rituals, festivals, parades, cultural shows, music, dance and theater. Topics include expressive culture as resistance; debates around authenticity and heritage; the performance of race, class and ethnic identities; the construction of national identity; and the effects of globalization on indigenous performances. Enrollment limited to 30.

Crosslist(s): MUS, ANT
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

This course is a general introduction to the relationship between indigenous societies and the state in Mesoamerica. Taking a broad historical perspective, we explore the rise of native state-level societies, the transformations that marked the process of European colonization, and the relationship of local indigenous communities to post-colonial states and transnational social movements. Texts used in the course place special emphasis on continuities and changes in language, social organization, cosmology and identity that have marked the historical experience of native groups in the region.

Crosslist(s): LAS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

What can anthropologists teach us about religion as a social phenomenon? This course traces significant anthropological approaches to the study of religion, asking what these approaches contribute to our understanding of religion in the contemporary world. Topics include religious experience and rationality; myth, ritual and magic; rites of passage; function and meaning; power and alienation; religion and politics. Readings are drawn from important texts in the history of anthropology and from contemporary ethnographies of religion.

Crosslist(s): BUS, REL
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 10
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

This course harnesses students’ current and previous coursework to address a “real life” ethnographic design problem. Working in conjunction with students enrolled in ANT 200, students will help to design and carry out a qualitative research project led by an anthropology faculty member and will gain insight into anthropology’s practical applications. Students are expected to take leadership roles, think creatively and concretely, work well collaboratively, and see projects through to completion. Regular meetings, progress reports, interim and final reports, and presentations are required. Permission of instructor required. Enrollment limit of 10.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Once maligned as a dangerous "gateway drug" and as a troubling sign of social decay, cannabis is increasingly regarded as a potent and future-focused remedy for a range of medical and social ills. This course considers this rapid and dramatic cultural, legal, and political transformation and what it has to teach us about much broader social shifts and tensions. Our study of cannabis will be a starting point for thinking about a variety of crucial anthropological topics, including human-plant relations, legality and illegality, race and (in)justice, pharmaceuticals and botanical treatments, kinship and care, science and expertise, and disability activism. ?


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 5 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to Modern Standard and colloquial Arabic, using a proficiency-based approach to develop communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic alphabet, and progresses quickly toward developing basic reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiencies and cultural competence using the Al-Kitaab series and a variety of authentic materials.  Students will acquire these skills through a combination of interactive classroom activities, take-home assignments and group work.  Students should be at the Novice-Mid level by the end of this course.  No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to18.

Credits: 5 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to Modern Standard and colloquial Arabic, using a proficiency-based approach to develop communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic alphabet, and progresses quickly toward developing basic reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiencies and cultural competence using the Al-Kitaab series and a variety of authentic materials.  Students will acquire these skills through a combination of interactive classroom activities, take-home assignments and group work.  Students should be at the Novice-Mid level by the end of this course.  No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to18.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

This is a communication-oriented course in Arabic at the intermediate level, incorporating both Modern Standard and colloquial Arabic and providing students with an opportunity to hone their skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  Students will expand their ability to create with the language while reinforcing fundamentals and expanding their knowledge of vocabulary, grammar, and culture. In addition to in-class teamwork, students will produce a variety of essays, presentations and skits throughout the semester.  Prerequisite: ARA 101 or its equivalent.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

This helps students achieve an advanced level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach. Students read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world. Text types address a range of political, social, religious and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles and periods. All of these texts may include hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that covers both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This course covers Al-Kitaab, Book 3, units 1–5 in addition to extra instructional materials. Prerequisite: ARA 202, or the completion of Al-Kitaab, Book 2, or its equivalent. Students must be able to use formal spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: FY/SO only
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science, Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Offered as ANT 135 and ARC 135. This course studies past cultures and societies through their material remains and explores how archaeologists use different field methods, analytical technique and theoretical approaches to investigate, reconstruct and learn from the past. Data from settlement surveys, site excavations and artifact analysis are used to address economic, social, political and ideological questions across time and space. This course is taught from an anthropological perspective, exploring key transitions in human prehistory, including the origins of food production, social inequality and state-level societies across the globe. Relevance of archaeological practice in modern political, economic and social contexts is explored. Limited to first-year students and sophomores. Enrollment limited to 30.

Crosslist(s): ARC, HSC
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer 103 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course explores how art and architecture have profoundly shaped visual experiences and shifting understandings of the past and present. Featuring different case studies, each section includes work with original objects, site visits and writings about art. Unifying themes include: (1) materials, techniques and the patterns deployed to create space; (2) the design, function and symbolism of images and monuments; (3) artistic production and its relation to individual and institutional patronage, religion, politics and aesthetics; (4) issues turning on artists’ fame versus anonymity and uniqueness versus reproducibility; and (5) cross-cultural exchanges. Enrollment limited to 25.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Historical Studies
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

This course explores how art and architecture have profoundly shaped visual experiences and shifting understandings of the past and present. Featuring different case studies, each section includes work with original objects, site visits and writings about art. Unifying themes include: (1) materials, techniques and the patterns deployed to create space; (2) the design, function and symbolism of images and monuments; (3) artistic production and its relation to individual and institutional patronage, religion, politics and aesthetics; (4) issues turning on artists’ fame versus anonymity and uniqueness versus reproducibility; and (5) cross-cultural exchanges. Enrollment limited to 25.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Historical Studies
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

How do people of the present interpret the visual, material and urban cultures created in the Americas before the arrival of Europeans?  To explore this question, this class focuses upon recent research — especially about the Inka, the Aztec, and their ancestors — but we will also study current debates in art history and archaeology. Among the themes we will discuss: sacrifice and rulership, representations of human and deified beings, the symbolic and economic meanings of materials and the ethics of excavation and museum display. Case studies include architectural complexes, textiles, ceramics and sculpted works from Peru, Mexico, the Caribbean and the U.S. Southwest. Group A, Counts for ARU

Crosslist(s): LAS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / Hillyer 103 Instructional Method: In-Person

A study of painting, sculpture, architecture, urban and landscape design, printmaking and the luxury arts in France, from the last years of Louis XIV's reign to the French Revolution. Recurring themes include artists' training and careers; academies, aesthetics, and art theory; art criticism and the viewing public; collecting and display; patronage; and the relationship of art to politics, literature and science. France's pacesetting role in contemporary art will be explored by looking beyond its borders to other courts — among them Bourbon Naples, some German-speaking principalities, Great Britain, Russia, Spain, and Sweden — and to the French Atlantic world. Group A, Counts for ARU

Crosslist(s): FRN
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Historical Studies
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

The Haitian revolution, Darwin’s On the Origin of Species, the rise of photography: the nineteenth century witnessed the emergence of new ways of seeing, knowing, and being in the world. We will consider the ways art objects and the built environment revealed, constructed, and mediated nineteenth-century life. We will study key case studies, from painting and sculpture to advertising ephemera, to understand significant cultural nodes. Our conversations will center around the meaningful role objects play in shaping and constructing social experience, and key concepts elaborated by nineteenth-century thinkers, such as modernism. The course will primarily focus on Europe and the US. Group B

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Historical Studies
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Hillyer GRAHAM Instructional Method: In-Person

This class addresses the history and theory of performance art since the 1960s, introducing artists whose work has shaped the field and the issues which have become important in the reception of performance art.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM / Hillyer 103 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course looks at the famed third-century BCE library at Alexandria, Egypt, precedents like the library of the Assyrian king Assurbanipal at Nineveh (with epics and omen texts on clay tablets) and later extant examples like the Library of Celsus at Ephesus to discuss the development of the library as a public building type. We also compare later innovations like Labrouste’s Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève in Paris, Snøhetta’s award-winning 2002 Bibliotheca Alexandrina (on the site of the ancient library) and Maya Lin’s renovation of Neilson Library (under construction), analyzing how the buildings themselves make knowledge manifest. Group A, Counts for ARU

Crosslist(s): BKX
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Historical Studies
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Hillyer 109 Instructional Method: In-Person

The meanings we ascribe to art works of any culture or time period are a direct result of our own preoccupations and methods. This colloquium gives a broad overview of contemporary debates in the history of art and locates these methods within art history’s own intellectual history. Among the topics we consider: technologies of vision; histories of interpreting art across cultural boundaries; colonialism and the history of art and globalism. The course consists of wide-ranging weekly readings and discussion, giving special attention to the intersection of art history and other disciplines. Open to students of any major. Prerequisites: One 200-level art history course or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 18.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only
Curriculum Distribution: Arts, Historical Studies
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Hillyer 109 Instructional Method: In-Person

Why did the First Emperor of China build his grand mausoleum as a microcosm? What foreign motifs and luxury goods were brought to the Chinese proper and by whom? How did trade and war affect the making of the arts 2,000 years ago? These are some of the core questions embedded in this seminar, which investigates the power of things that made a difference in shaping the conditions of the Qin and the Han, Chinese first empires. Throughout the semester, we will closely examine art objects and read leading scholars of early imperial Chinese art around the world. Counts for ARU.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 14
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Hillyer 320 Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to the use of digital media in the context of contemporary art practice. Students explore content development and design principles through a series of projects involving text, still image and moving image. This class involves critical discussions of studio projects in relation to contemporary art and theory. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 14.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Hillyer 203 Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to visual experience through a study of the basic elements of drawing. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 18.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer 203 Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to visual experience through a study of the basic elements of drawing. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 18.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM / Hillyer 203 Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to visual experience through a study of the basic elements of drawing. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 18.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer 205 Instructional Method: In-Person

This cross-disciplinary studio course involves two-dimensional, three-dimensional and time-based approaches. Students are introduced to a range of conceptual and practical frameworks for making and thinking about art. This course is strongly recommended for students considering the art major. By emphasizing visual thinking, risk-taking and critical reflection, this course also has relevance for other disciplines. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Priority given to first-year students.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Hillyer L03 Instructional Method: In-Person

This cross-disciplinary studio course involves two-dimensional, three-dimensional and time-based approaches. Students are introduced to a range of conceptual and practical frameworks for making and thinking about art. This course is strongly recommended for students considering the art major. By emphasizing visual thinking, risk-taking and critical reflection, this course also has relevance for other disciplines. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Priority given to first-year students.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 14
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Hillyer 218 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course builds working knowledge of multimedia digital artwork through experience with a variety of software, focusing on video and time-based media. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 14. (No prerequisite required.)


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Hillyer 203 Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to more advanced theories and techniques of drawing, including the role of drawing in contemporary art. The emphasis of the class is on both studio work and class discussion. A major topic is the development of independent projects and practice. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: ARS 163, 172, or permission of the instructor.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Crosslist(s): LSS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Hillyer 211 Instructional Method: In-Person

Various spatial and pictorial concepts are investigated through the oil medium. Prerequisite: ARS 163 or permission of the instructor. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 18.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

This course is an in-depth introduction to the expressive potential of the printed image and the distinct visual and tactile qualities of etching and drypoint. We will explore how prints can function as social devices, manifestations of texture and opportunities for collaboration. Students may require additional supplies as well and will be responsible for purchasing them directly. Prerequisite: ARS 163 or 172, or permission of the instructor.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Hillyer L04 Instructional Method: In-Person

The human figure and other natural forms. Work in modeling and plaster casting. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: ARS 163, 172, or permission of the instructor.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer 204 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course introduces students to different installation strategies (e.g., working with multiples, found objects, light and site-specificity, among others). Coursework includes a series of projects, critiques, readings and a paper. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 12. Prerequisite: ARS 172, or permission of the instructor.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer 212 Instructional Method: In-Person

(1) Investigates the structure of the book as a form; (2) provides a brief history of the Latin alphabet and how it is shaped calligraphically and constructed geometrically; (3) studies traditional and non-traditional typography; and (4) practices the composition of metal type by hand and the printing of composed type on the SP-15 printing presses. A voluntary introduction to digital typography is also offered outside class. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 12.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Crosslist(s): BKX
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Hillyer L08 Instructional Method: In-Person

Relief printing from carved woodblocks can create images that range from precise and delicate to raw and expressionistic. It is a direct and flexible process that allows for printing on a variety of materials at large and small scales. We will use both ancient and contemporary technologies to produce black and white and color prints from single and multiple blocks. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: ARS 163 or 172, or permission of the instructor.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Hillyer 106 Instructional Method: In-Person

In nurturing architecture’s foundational principles of visual, material and conceptual experimentation, ARS 280 lays the foundation for subsequent studios, lifelong learning and curiosity for architectural design processes. It probes the material, organizational and spatial qualities of the ground—a shared horizontal territory inhabited by plants, people and buildings—one that is as much cultural as it is natural. Through iterative and analog processes, students integrate drawing and making to construct and reconstruct lines in the ground. Probing the physical and conceptual ground for natural or constructed patterns, students develop foundation-level design skills within the context of larger environmental and cultural discourses. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: ARH 110 or permission of the instructor.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer 218 Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to visual experience through a study of the basic elements of photography as an expressive medium. Each section involves either black and white or a combination of darkroom and digital processes. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: ARS 162, 172 or permission of the instructor.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Hillyer 106 Instructional Method: In-Person

This research-based architectural design studio utilizes digital processes to analyze and reinterpret canonical architectural precedents, linking the digital to fluid conceptual ideas which are both historic and contemporary. In particular, the studio probes the spatial qualities of the moving body—as a site of both deep interiority and hyper-connectivity. In a return to the territory of the ground (see ARS 280), and within the larger context of ecologically and geopolitically induced migration and displacement, this studio investigates themes related to mobility and transience and the ways in which the body traverses territories of ground. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: ARS 280 and ARS 281 or permission of the instructor.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: ARS Major only; SR only
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Hillyer 320 Instructional Method: In-Person

This capstone course is required for all senior ARS majors. Students will use the framework of the course to focus, challenge and re-conceptualize their studio work in media of their choice. Critiques, readings, written assignments, presentations and discussions will support the development of an inventive and rigorous independent art practice. The semester will culminate in a group exhibition. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to Smith College Senior ARS majors.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 60
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / McConnell 404 Instructional Method: In-Person

Discover how the forces of nature shape our understanding of the cosmos. Explore the origin, structure and evolution of the Earth, moons and planets, comets and asteroids, the Sun and other stars, star clusters, the Milky Way and other galaxies, clusters of galaxies, and the universe as a whole. Designed for nonscience majors.

Credits: 3 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday | 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM / McConnell 406 Instructional Method: In-Person

Discover how astronomers know about the universe by observing the light that comes to us from distant objects. View the sky with your naked eye, binoculars, and a small telescope. Take pictures with a professional telescope, and examine astronomical images. Designed for non-science majors.  Enrollment limited to 20 students per section.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / McConnell 404 Instructional Method: In-Person

A comprehensive introduction to the study of modern astronomy, covering planets—their origins, orbits, interiors, surfaces and atmospheres; stars—their formation, structure and evolution; and the universe—its origin, large-scale structure and ultimate destiny. This introductory course is for students who are planning to major in science or math. Prerequisite: MTH 111 or the equivalent.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM / McConnell 404 Instructional Method: In-Person

A calculus-based introduction to the properties, structure, formation and evolution of stars and galaxies. The laws of gravity, thermal physics and atomic physics provide a basis for understanding observed properties of stars, interstellar gas and dust. We apply these concepts to develop an understanding of stellar atmospheres, interiors and evolution, the interstellar medium, and the Milky Way and other galaxies. Prerequisites: two semesters of college-level physics and second-semester calculus.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM / McConnell 406 Instructional Method: In-Person

In this section of AST 337 we provide an introduction to the techniques of gathering and analyzing astronomical data, with an emphasis on optical observations related to studying stellar evolution. Students use Smith’s telescopes and CCD cameras to collect and analyze their own data, using the Python computing language. Topics covered include astronomical coordinate and time systems; telescope design and optics; instrumentation and techniques for imaging and photometry; astronomical detectors; digital image processing tools and techniques; atmospheric phenomena affecting astronomical observations; and error analysis and curve fitting. Prerequisites: at least one of AST 224, 225, 226 or 228, and one physics course at the 200-level. Previous experience in computer programming is strongly recommended.

Credits: 3 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Chemical dynamics in living systems. Enzyme mechanisms, metabolism and its regulation, energy production and utilization. Prerequisites: BCH 252 and CHM 224. Laboratory (353) must be taken concurrently by biochemistry majors; optional for others.

Crosslist(s): CHM
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: BCH 352 (may be concurrent)
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:10 PM - 5:00 PM / Ford 220 Instructional Method: In-Person

Investigations of biochemical systems using experimental techniques in current biochemical research. Emphasis is on independent experimental design and execution. BCH 352 is a prerequisite or must be taken concurrently.

Crosslist(s): CHM
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: BCH 352 (may be concurrent)
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:10 PM - 5:00 PM / Ford 220 Instructional Method: In-Person

Investigations of biochemical systems using experimental techniques in current biochemical research. Emphasis is on independent experimental design and execution. BCH 352 is a prerequisite or must be taken concurrently.

Crosslist(s): CHM
Credits: 3 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Known since the ancient Egyptians, cancers may be considered a set of normal cellular processes gone awry in various cell types. This seminar considers chemical and radiation carcinogenesis, oncogenesis, growth factor signaling pathways and the role of hormones in cancers, as well as the pathologies of the diseases. Prerequisites: BIO 202 and BIO 203.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Crosslist(s): CHM
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

This course focuses on the origin and diversification of our species (Homo sapiens), with a focus on African origins and genetic diversity among extant populations. Using principles from evolution, topics covered include: 1) the relationship of humans to other primates; 2) the timing and location of the origin of modern humans; 3) the geographic history of humans, and the structure of contemporary human diversity; and 4) implications of human genetics/genomics for healthcare/medicine.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

A course dealing with current topics in biology that are important in understanding important issues in today’s modern world. Many of these issues present important choices that must be made by individuals and by governments. Topics include cloning of plants and animals, human cloning, stem cell research, genetically modified organisms, CRISPR, bioterrorism, emerging infectious diseases such as coronavirus, Ebola, Zika and West Nile, gene therapy, DNA diagnostics and forensics, genome projects, human origins, human diversity, species extinction and de-extinction and others. The course includes outside readings and in-class discussions.

Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Lyman 111 Instructional Method: In-Person

Experiential, field-based course that seeks to ground students in the planted landscape and nurture a sense of place. Identification, morphology and uses of landscape plants including annuals, perennials, woody shrubs and trees, evergreens and groundcovers. Horticultural practices such as pruning, division, hybridizing, bulb planting, close observation, and design basics. Discussions will consider equity and access, local food systems, ecosystem services, urban greening, and climate/sustainability. Field trips (remote only in 2020) are an important component of the course. Projects include a field journal, short skill-share presentations, and a landscape design activity. Students who have already taken BIO 120/121 are not eligible to take BIO 125. Enrollment limit of 15 per section.

Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Lyman 111 Instructional Method: In-Person

Experiential, field-based course that seeks to ground students in the planted landscape and nurture a sense of place. Identification, morphology and uses of landscape plants including annuals, perennials, woody shrubs and trees, evergreens and groundcovers. Horticultural practices such as pruning, division, hybridizing, bulb planting, close observation, and design basics. Discussions will consider equity and access, local food systems, ecosystem services, urban greening, and climate/sustainability. Field trips (remote only in 2020) are an important component of the course. Projects include a field journal, short skill-share presentations, and a landscape design activity. Students who have already taken BIO 120/121 are not eligible to take BIO 125. Enrollment limit of 15 per section.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 99
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Students in this course investigate the origin, nature and importance of the diversity of life on Earth; key ecological processes and interactions that create and maintain communities and ecosystems; principle threats to biodiversity; and emerging conservation strategies to protect the elements and processes upon which we depend. Throughout the semester, we emphasize the relevance of diversity and ecological studies in conservation. Laboratory (BIO 131) is recommended but not required.

Crosslist(s): ENV, LSS
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 223 Instructional Method: In-Person

Pull on your boots and come explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens, and local hemlock forests. Students will gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students will practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed will include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Because research projects will vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. BIO 130 is recommended as a prerequisite or corequisite but is not required.

Crosslist(s): LSS, ENV
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 223 Instructional Method: In-Person

Pull on your boots and come explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens, and local hemlock forests. Students will gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students will practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed will include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Because research projects will vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. BIO 130 is recommended as a prerequisite or corequisite but is not required.

Crosslist(s): ENV, LSS
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 223 Instructional Method: In-Person

Pull on your boots and come explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens, and local hemlock forests. Students will gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students will practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed will include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Because research projects will vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. BIO 130 is recommended as a prerequisite or corequisite but is not required.

Crosslist(s): ENV, LSS
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 223 Instructional Method: In-Person

Pull on your boots and come explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens, and local hemlock forests. Students will gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students will practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed will include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Because research projects will vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. BIO 130 is recommended as a prerequisite or corequisite but is not required.

Crosslist(s): LSS, ENV
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 83
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Students in this course investigate the structure, function and physiology of cells; the properties of biological molecules; information transfer from the level of DNA to cell-cell communication; and cellular energy generation and transfer. The development of multicellular organisms and the physiology of selected organ systems is also explored. In addition to attending lectures, each student participates in discussion sections that focus on data analysis and interpretation while integrating mechanisms across scales. Laboratory (BIO 133) is recommended but not required.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Students in this course investigate the structure, function and physiology of cells; the properties of biological molecules; information transfer from the level of DNA to cell-cell communication; and cellular energy generation and transfer. The development of multicellular organisms and the physiology of selected organ systems is also explored. In addition to attending lectures, each student participates in discussion sections that focus on data analysis and interpretation while integrating mechanisms across scales. Laboratory (BIO 133) is recommended but not required.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 4:10 PM - 5:25 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Students in this course investigate the structure, function and physiology of cells; the properties of biological molecules; information transfer from the level of DNA to cell-cell communication; and cellular energy generation and transfer. The development of multicellular organisms and the physiology of selected organ systems is also explored. In addition to attending lectures, each student participates in discussion sections that focus on data analysis and interpretation while integrating mechanisms across scales. Laboratory (BIO 133) is recommended but not required.

Crosslist(s): NSC, BCH
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Students in this course investigate the structure, function and physiology of cells; the properties of biological molecules; information transfer from the level of DNA to cell-cell communication; and cellular energy generation and transfer. The development of multicellular organisms and the physiology of selected organ systems is also explored. In addition to attending lectures, each student participates in discussion sections that focus on data analysis and interpretation while integrating mechanisms across scales. Laboratory (BIO 133) is recommended but not required.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Students in this course investigate the structure, function and physiology of cells; the properties of biological molecules; information transfer from the level of DNA to cell-cell communication; and cellular energy generation and transfer. The development of multicellular organisms and the physiology of selected organ systems is also explored. In addition to attending lectures, each student participates in discussion sections that focus on data analysis and interpretation while integrating mechanisms across scales. Laboratory (BIO 133) is recommended but not required.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: BIO 132 (may be concurrent)
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 122 Instructional Method: In-Person

This Laboratory Course introduces students to biological discovery and the biological research process. Students will gain hands-on experience with the use of modern biological research methods by participating in ongoing research with a variety of organisms. This includes scientific discovery, hypothesis development, data collection and analysis, as well as presentation of your own discoveries and results. Research projects vary with each Instructor. Prerequisite: BIO 132 , (normally taken concurrently).

Crosslist(s): NSC, BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: BIO 132 (may be concurrent)
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 122 Instructional Method: In-Person

This Laboratory Course introduces students to biological discovery and the biological research process. Students will gain hands-on experience with the use of modern biological research methods by participating in ongoing research with a variety of organisms. This includes scientific discovery, hypothesis development, data collection and analysis, as well as presentation of your own discoveries and results. Research projects vary with each Instructor. Prerequisite: BIO 132 , (normally taken concurrently).

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: BIO 132 (may be concurrent)
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 122 Instructional Method: In-Person

This Laboratory Course introduces students to biological discovery and the biological research process. Students will gain hands-on experience with the use of modern biological research methods by participating in ongoing research with a variety of organisms. This includes scientific discovery, hypothesis development, data collection and analysis, as well as presentation of your own discoveries and results. Research projects vary with each Instructor. Prerequisite: BIO 132 , (normally taken concurrently).

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: BIO 132 (may be concurrent)
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 122 Instructional Method: In-Person

This Laboratory Course introduces students to biological discovery and the biological research process. Students will gain hands-on experience with the use of modern biological research methods by participating in ongoing research with a variety of organisms. This includes scientific discovery, hypothesis development, data collection and analysis, as well as presentation of your own discoveries and results. Research projects vary with each Instructor. Prerequisite: BIO 132 , (normally taken concurrently).

Crosslist(s): NSC, BCH
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

In this course you will learn how animal bodies function from the molecular to the organismal level and how the physiology of animals, including humans, has been shaped by evolution to enable survival in a wide range of environments. Course content is organized by body system (cardiovascular, respiratory, reproductive, etc.). Assignments provide opportunities for students to practice applying their knowledge of physiology to real-life situations, predicting the outcomes of experiments, and interpreting and writing about the primary literature. Prerequisites: BIO 132/133 and CHM 111 or CHM 118. Laboratory (BIO 201) is recommended but not required.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: BIO 200 (may be concurrent)
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 408 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course provides students with the opportunity to design and conduct experiments in human and animal physiology. Emphasis is on developing hypotheses, designing experiments, graphing data, interpreting results, and writing in the scientific style. Prerequisite: BIO 200 (normally taken concurrently).

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: BIO 200 (may be concurrent)
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 408 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course provides students with the opportunity to design and conduct experiments in human and animal physiology. Emphasis is on developing hypotheses, designing experiments, graphing data, interpreting results, and writing in the scientific style. Prerequisite: BIO 200, normally taken concurrently.

Crosslist(s): NSC, BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: BIO 200 (may be concurrent)
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Friday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 408 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course provides students with the opportunity to design and conduct experiments in human and animal physiology. Emphasis is on developing hypotheses, designing experiments, graphing data, interpreting results, and writing in the scientific style. Prerequisite: BIO 200, normally taken concurrently.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

The structure and function of eukaryotic cells. This course examines contemporary topics in cellular biology: cellular structures, organelle function, membrane and endomembrane systems, cellular regulation, signaling mechanisms, motility, bioelectricity, communication and cellular energetics. This course is a prerequisite for Biochemistry I (BCH 252). Prerequisites: BIO 132/133 and CHM 222. Laboratory (BIO 203) is recommended but not required.

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: BIO 202 (may be concurrent)
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 120 Instructional Method: In-Person

Inquiry-based laboratory using techniques such as spectrophotometry, enzyme kinetics, bright field and fluorescence light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The emphasis is on student-designed projects. This course is a prerequisite for Biochemistry I Laboratory (BCH 253). Prerequisite: BIO 202, (should be taken concurrently).

Crosslist(s): NSC, BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: BIO 202 (may be concurrent)
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 120 Instructional Method: In-Person

Inquiry-based laboratory using techniques such as spectrophotometry, enzyme kinetics, bright field and fluorescence light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The emphasis is on student-designed projects. This course is a prerequisite for Biochemistry I Laboratory (BCH 253). Prerequisite: BIO 202, (should be taken concurrently).

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: BIO 202 (may be concurrent)
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 120 Instructional Method: In-Person

Inquiry-based laboratory using techniques such as spectrophotometry, enzyme kinetics, bright field and fluorescence light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The emphasis is on student-designed projects. This course is a prerequisite for Biochemistry I Laboratory (BCH 253). Prerequisite: BIO 202, (should be taken concurrently).

Crosslist(s): NSC, BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: BIO 202 (may be concurrent)
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Friday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 120 Instructional Method: In-Person

Inquiry-based laboratory using techniques such as spectrophotometry, enzyme kinetics, bright field and fluorescence light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The emphasis is on student-designed projects. This course is a prerequisite for Biochemistry I Laboratory (BCH 253). Prerequisite: BIO 202, (should be taken concurrently).

Crosslist(s): BCH, NSC
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Evolution frames much of biology by providing insights into how and why things change over time. For example, the study of evolution is essential to: understanding transitions in biodiversity across time and space, elucidating patterns of genetic variation within and between populations, and developing both vaccines and treatments for human diseases. Topics in this course include population genetics, molecular evolution, speciation, phylogenetics and macroevolution. Prerequisite: BIO 130 or BIO 132 or permission of the instructor.

Crosslist(s): SDS
Credits: 3 Max Enrollment: 24
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 269 - Marine Ecology Laboratory
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

The oceans cover over 75 percent of the Earth and are home to enormous biodiversity. Marine Ecology explores a variety of coastal and oceanic systems, focusing on natural and human-induced factors that affect biodiversity and the ecological balance in marine habitats. Using case studies, we study some successful conservation and management strategies, including Marine Protected Areas. This course uses a variety of readings, group activities and short writing assignments to develop vital skills such as effective oral, graphical and written communication; critical thinking; and problem solving. Enrollment limited to 24. Corequisite: BIO 269.

Crosslist(s): ENV, LSS
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 268 - Marine Ecology
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 204 Instructional Method: In-Person

The laboratory applies concepts discussed in lecture and uses several small-group projects in the field and laboratory to develop relevant skills for conducting marine-related research. Students learn to design and analyze experiments, and to write in the scientific style. Field trips to Maine and Cape Cod, Mass., provide hands-on experience with marine organisms in their natural habitats. Corequisite: BIO 268.

Crosslist(s): LSS, ENV
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 268 - Marine Ecology
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 204 Instructional Method: In-Person

The laboratory applies concepts discussed in lecture and uses several small-group projects in the field and laboratory to develop relevant skills for conducting marine-related research. Students learn to design and analyze experiments, and to write in the scientific style. Field trips to Maine and Cape Cod, Mass., provide hands-on experience with marine organisms in their natural habitats. Corequisite: BIO 268.

Crosslist(s): ENV, LSS
Credits: 3 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:10 PM - 4:50 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Students design and carry out their own experiments focused on neural and muscle development using zebrafish as a model system. Techniques covered include embryology, indirect immunocytochemistry, in situ hybridization, microinjection of RNA for gain or loss of function studies, pharmacological analysis, GFP-transgenics, an array of microscopy techniques. This laboratory is designed as a true research experience and thus requires time outside of the normally scheduled lab period. Enrollment limited to 18.

Crosslist(s): NSC
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Molecular level structure-function relationships in the nervous system. Topics include development of neurons, neuron-specific gene expression, mechanisms of neuronal plasticity in learning and memory, synaptic release, molecular biology of neurological disorders, and molecular neuropharmacology. Prerequisites: BIO 200 and NSC 210 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20.

Crosslist(s): NSC, BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 6
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Credit/Non Credit Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Time/Location: Friday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 411 Instructional Method: In-Person

The LSCM is used to study fluorescently labelled live or fixed cells, tissues, and small organisms. By blocking the out-of-focus light, the image quality is improved compared to widefield fluorescence microscopy. Optical sections of materials can be collected and used to reconstruct the three-dimensional structure. Mechanical and optical components will be reviewed and operational parameters improving image quality covered. Instruction includes lectures, demonstrations and discussions and substitutes part of CMI training towards independent microscope use.

Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 6
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Time/Location: Friday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 411 Instructional Method: In-Person

The TIRFM is used to study fluorescently labelled molecules in a very thin region of the sample adjacent to the coverglass. With a depth of up to ~100nm, this technique is well-suited to examine, for example, individual molecules, cell membranes, and other cell surface components and processes. Mechanical and optical components will be reviewed and operational parameters improving image quality covered. Instruction includes lectures, demonstrations and discussions and substitutes part of CMI training towards independent microscope use.

Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 6
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Credit/Non Credit Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Time/Location: Friday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 411 Instructional Method: In-Person

The SEM is used to examine small surface features of both biological and nonbiological materials. By using a beam of electrons, a resolution of 3-10nm can be achieved. Besides high-resolution surface topography, compositional information about a sample can be collected when the system is equipped with an X-ray detector. Mechanical and optical components will be reviewed and operational parameters improving image quality covered. Instruction includes lectures, demonstrations and discussions and substitutes part of CMI training towards independent microscope use.

Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 6
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Credit/Non Credit Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Time/Location: Friday | 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 411 Instructional Method: In-Person

The TEM is used to study morphological features of large molecules, cells, tissues, small organisms, and particles at a resolution of 0.3 nm. Ultrathin sections (~100nm) need to be cut to study internal features of cells and tissue. Negative staining techniques can be applied to observe large molecules, small organisms, and particles. Mechanical and optical components will be reviewed and operational parameters improving image quality covered. Instruction includes lectures, demonstrations and discussions and substitutes part of CMI training towards independent microscope use.

Credits: 3 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

This course focuses on methods and approaches in the emerging fields of bioinformatics and molecular evolution. Topics include the quantitative examination of genetic variation; selective and stochastic forces shaping proteins and catalytic RNA; data mining; comparative analysis of whole genome data sets; comparative genomics and bioinformatics; and hypothesis testing in computational biology. We explore the role of bioinformatics and comparative methods in the fields of molecular medicine, drug design, and in systematic, conservation and population biology. Prerequisite: BIO 132, or BIO 230, or BIO 232, or permission of the instructor. Laboratory (BIO 335) is strongly recommended but not required.

Crosslist(s): SDS
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 14
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: BIO 334 (may be concurrent)
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

This lab introduces the computational and quantitative tools underlying contemporary bioinformatics. We explore the various approaches to phylogenetic reconstruction using molecular data, methods of data mining in genome databases, comparative genomics, structure-function modeling, and the use of molecular data to reconstruct population and evolutionary history. Students are encouraged to explore datasets of particular interest to them. Prerequisite: BIO 334 (normally taken concurrently), or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 14.

Credits: 3 Max Enrollment: 40
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Ongoing developments in high-throughput sequencing technologies have made genomic analysis a central feature of many scientific disciplines, including forensics, medicine, ecology, and evolution. This course will review the scope and applications of genome sequencing projects. After completing the course, students will be prepared to design a high-throughput sequencing project and interpret the results of genomic analysis. Prerequisite: BIO 230, BIO 232, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 40.

Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 336 - Genomics
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

This lab will cover genomic analysis pipelines from nucleic acid isolation to sequence analysis in Linux
and R environments. Students will independently design and execute a high-throughput sequencing
experiment to measure genetic variation in natural populations. Prerequisite: BIO 230 or 232. Corequisite: BIO 336. Enrollment limited to 12.

Credits: 3 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only; Prereq: BIO 230
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

This seminar focuses on neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), parasitic and viral diseases other rare diseases that are a public health concern, including Ebola, Chikungunya, Dengue Fever, West Nile, SARS, avian influenza, malaria, river blindness, anthrax and smallpox. We look at pandemics of the past (the influenza of 1918, the Black Death of the Middle Ages, the typhus epidemic of 1914–21) and modern biotechnology. The challenges are great, but new tools of molecular biology (genomics, proteomics, RNA interference, next-generation sequencing, etc.) provide an unprecedented opportunity to understand and develop new strategies for their elimination. Prerequisite: BIO 230 or instructor permission.

Credits: 3 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 205 Instructional Method: In-Person

Research design and methodology for field and laboratory studies of animal behavior. Prerequisite, one of the following: BIO 260, 272, 362, a statistics course, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15 students.

Crosslist(s): NSC
Credits: 3 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 365 - Plant Ecology Laboratory
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Sabin-Reed 208 Instructional Method: In-Person

This course surveys the environmental factors, historical processes and ecological interactions that influence the distribution and abundance of plant species in the landscape. The class examines how plant communities are assembled and what processes influence their structure and diversity, including past and present human activities. We focus in particular on plant communities of the Northeast, using examples from the local landscape to illustrate key ecological concepts. Prerequisite: a course in plant biology, ecology or environmental science; statistics is recommended (e.g., MTH 220). BIO 365 must be taken concurrently. Enrollment limited to 20.

Crosslist(s): ENV, LSS
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: BIO 364 - Plant Ecology
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:10 PM - 5:00 PM / Sabin-Reed 208 Instructional Method: In-Person

This lab course involves field and laboratory investigations of plant ecology, with an emphasis on Northeastern plant species and plant communities. The labs explore interactions between plants and insects, visit wetland and upland habitats, and investigate plant population dynamics at sites around western Massachusetts. Students gain hands-on experience with descriptive and experimental research approaches used to investigate ecological processes in plant communities. Corequisite: BIO 364. Enrollment limited to 20.

Crosslist(s): LSS, ENV
Credits: 3 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Conservation biology combines ecological and evolutionary principles with resource management, the social sciences, and ethics to understand, manage and maintain biodiversity. This seminar is designed to familiarize students with the questions conservation biologists ask and the methods they use to conserve life on Earth. Students engage in problem-solving exercises that examine conservation-related questions at the genetic, population, community, landscape or ecosystem levels and employ suitable analytical techniques or strategies to address the questions. Students discuss a related article from the primary literature to illustrate the use of each technique. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Crosslist(s): ENV
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: BIO M.S./M.A. only
Time/Location: Thursday | 8:25 AM - 10:15 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Students in this seminar discuss articles from the primary literature representing diverse fields of biology and present on their own research projects. Journal articles will be selected to coordinate with departmental colloquia. In alternate weeks, students present talks on research goals, data collection and data analysis. This course is required for graduate students and must be taken both years.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Credit/Non Credit Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: SR only
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 8:00 AM - 9:15 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

The culminating experience for the book studies concentration is an independent research project that synthesizes the student’s academic and practical experiences. The student’s concentration adviser may or may not serve as the sponsor for the project; topics for this capstone project is decided in concert with the student’s adviser and vetted by the concentration’s director. The seminar meets once each week to discuss methodology and progress on the independent projects and to discuss general readings in book studies theory and praxis. Enrollment limited to book studies concentrators who are seniors. Graded S/U only.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Credit/Non Credit Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies
Time/Location: Monday | 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

This course introduces students to the academic study of Buddhism through readings, lectures by Smith faculty and guests, and trips to local Buddhist centers. We critically examine the history of Buddhist studies within the context of numerous disciplines, including anthropology, art, cultural studies, gender studies, government, literature, philosophy and religion, with a focus on regional, sectarian and historical differences. Materials to be considered include poetry, painting, philosophy, political tracts and more. This course meets during the first half of the semester only. Graded S/U only. 


First half of semester course.

Crosslist(s): REL
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Credit/Non Credit Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Time/Location: Thursday | 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Service learning, civic engagement, community-based participatory research and community service are familiar terms for describing forms of community-based learning (CBL) in higher education. Theorists and practitioners continue to debate how students and faculty can best join partners to support community-driven goals in areas nearby colleges and universities. Students consider these issues through exploring the literature of community engagement and learning from the experiences of those who practice its different forms. CCX 120 serves as a gateway course for the Community Engagement and Social Change Concentration. Students are introduced to the varied opportunities available at the college for engaging with communities. S/U only.

Crosslist(s): EDC
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 18
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: CCX 120 or SWG 150
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Social Science
Time/Location: Wednesday/Friday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Offered as SWG 245 and CCX 245. This course is designed to introduce students to key concepts, debates and provocations that animate the world of community, labor, and electoral organizing for social change. To better understand these movements’ visions, we will develop an analysis of global and national inequalities, exploitation and oppression. The course explores a range of organizing skills to build an awareness of power dynamics and learn activists’ tools to bring people together towards common goals. A central aspect of this course is practicing community-based learning and research methods in dialogue with community-based activist partners. Enrollment limited to 18.

Credits: 5 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

An intensive introduction to spoken Mandarin and modern written Chinese, presenting basic elements of grammar, sentence structures and active mastery of the most commonly used Chinese characters. Emphasis on development of oral/aural proficiency, pronunciation, and the acquisition of skills in reading and writing Chinese characters.

Credits: 5 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 10:50 AM - 11:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

An intensive introduction to spoken Mandarin and modern written Chinese, presenting basic elements of grammar, sentence structures and active mastery of the most commonly used Chinese characters. Emphasis on development of oral/aural proficiency, pronunciation, and the acquisition of skills in reading and writing Chinese characters.

Credits: 5 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 1:20 PM - 2:10 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

An intensive introduction to spoken Mandarin and modern written Chinese, presenting basic elements of grammar, sentence structures and active mastery of the most commonly used Chinese characters. Emphasis on development of oral/aural proficiency, pronunciation, and the acquisition of skills in reading and writing Chinese characters.

Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

An intensive introduction to spoken Mandarin and modern written Chinese, presenting basic elements of grammar, sentence structures and active mastery of the most commonly used Chinese characters. Emphasis on development of oral/aural proficiency, pronunciation, and the acquisition of skills in reading and writing Chinese characters.

Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 11:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

An intensive introduction to spoken Mandarin and modern written Chinese, presenting basic elements of grammar, sentence structures and active mastery of the most commonly used Chinese characters. Emphasis on development of oral/aural proficiency, pronunciation, and the acquisition of skills in reading and writing Chinese characters.

Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 2:10 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

An intensive introduction to spoken Mandarin and modern written Chinese, presenting basic elements of grammar, sentence structures and active mastery of the most commonly used Chinese characters. Emphasis on development of oral/aural proficiency, pronunciation, and the acquisition of skills in reading and writing Chinese characters.

Credits: 5 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 8:25 AM - 9:15 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Continued emphasis on the development of oral proficiency and functional literacy in modern Mandarin. Conversation and narrative practice, reading exercises, short composition assignments, and work with audio-visual materials. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor.

Credits: 5 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Continued emphasis on the development of oral proficiency and functional literacy in modern Mandarin. Conversation and narrative practice, reading exercises, short composition assignments, and work with audio-visual materials. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor.

Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 8:25 AM - 9:15 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Continued emphasis on the development of oral proficiency and functional literacy in modern Mandarin. Conversation and narrative practice, reading exercises, short composition assignments, and work with audio-visual materials. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor.

Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Continued emphasis on the development of oral proficiency and functional literacy in modern Mandarin. Conversation and narrative practice, reading exercises, short composition assignments, and work with audio-visual materials. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 8:25 AM - 9:15 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Building on the skills and vocabulary acquired in Chinese II, students learn to read simple essays on topics of common interest and develop the ability to understand, summarize and discuss social issues in contemporary China. Readings are supplemented by audio-visual materials. Prerequisite: CHI 221 or permission of the instructor.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Foreign Language
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 10:50 AM - 11:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

This course is designed to help students to deepen their understanding of China’s culture and society
through the controversies and debates surrounding the epidemics, and Covid-19 in particular, while
developing their Chinese language skills in the process. In this course, we will attempt to understand
people’s experiences and feelings in the locked-down cities, analyze gender issues in the medical care
workplace, and study discrimination against people who are from high-risk districts. We will explore topics such as whether or not people feel comfortable covering their faces; the role of NGOs in epidemics; and so on.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 55
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: CHM 111L - General Chemistry I Lab
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 8:00 AM - 9:15 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

The first semester of our core chemistry curriculum introduces the language(s) of chemistry and explores atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiometry. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. Multiple sections are offered at different times, as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Corequisite: CHM 111L

Crosslist(s): ENV, BCH
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 55
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: CHM 111L - General Chemistry I Lab
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

The first semester of our core chemistry curriculum introduces the language(s) of chemistry and explores atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiometry. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. Multiple sections are offered at different times, as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Corequisite: CHM 111L

Crosslist(s): BCH, ENV
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 55
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: CHM 111L - General Chemistry I Lab
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

The first semester of our core chemistry curriculum introduces the language(s) of chemistry and explores atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiometry. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. Multiple sections are offered at different times, as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Corequisite: CHM 111L

Crosslist(s): BCH, ENV
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: CHM 111 - Chemistry I: General
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab course accompanying CHM 111. Students will be introduced to and practice stoichiometry skills, basic laboratory techniques and laboratory safety. Precipitation reactions and visible light spectroscopy will be introduced as techniques to analyze the composition of solutions qualitatively and quantitatively. A guided inquiry group project will practice the scientific process and culminates in writing an individual scientific report and a group oral presentation. Each student will also keep a laboratory notebook. Sections are offered at different times as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Enrollment limited to 16 per section. Corequisite: CHM 111

Crosslist(s): ENV, BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: CHM 111 - Chemistry I: General
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab course accompanying CHM 111. Students will be introduced to and practice stoichiometry skills, basic laboratory techniques and laboratory safety. Precipitation reactions and visible light spectroscopy will be introduced as techniques to analyze the composition of solutions qualitatively and quantitatively. A guided inquiry group project will practice the scientific process and culminates in writing an individual scientific report and a group oral presentation. Each student will also keep a laboratory notebook. Sections are offered at different times as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Enrollment limited to 16 per section. Corequisite: CHM 111

Crosslist(s): BCH, ENV
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: CHM 111 - Chemistry I: General
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Friday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab course accompanying CHM 111. Students will be introduced to and practice stoichiometry skills, basic laboratory techniques and laboratory safety. Precipitation reactions and visible light spectroscopy will be introduced as techniques to analyze the composition of solutions qualitatively and quantitatively. A guided inquiry group project will practice the scientific process and culminates in writing an individual scientific report and a group oral presentation. Each student will also keep a laboratory notebook. Sections are offered at different times as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Enrollment limited to 16 per section. Corequisite: CHM 111

Crosslist(s): BCH, ENV
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: CHM 111 - Chemistry I: General
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Friday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab course accompanying CHM 111. Students will be introduced to and practice stoichiometry skills, basic laboratory techniques and laboratory safety. Precipitation reactions and visible light spectroscopy will be introduced as techniques to analyze the composition of solutions qualitatively and quantitatively. A guided inquiry group project will practice the scientific process and culminates in writing an individual scientific report and a group oral presentation. Each student will also keep a laboratory notebook. Sections are offered at different times as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Enrollment limited to 16 per section. Corequisite: CHM 111

Crosslist(s): ENV, BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: CHM 111 - Chemistry I: General
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab course accompanying CHM 111. Students will be introduced to and practice stoichiometry skills, basic laboratory techniques and laboratory safety. Precipitation reactions and visible light spectroscopy will be introduced as techniques to analyze the composition of solutions qualitatively and quantitatively. A guided inquiry group project will practice the scientific process and culminates in writing an individual scientific report and a group oral presentation. Each student will also keep a laboratory notebook. Sections are offered at different times as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Enrollment limited to 16 per section. Corequisite: CHM 111

Crosslist(s): BCH, ENV
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: CHM 111 - Chemistry I: General
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab course accompanying CHM 111. Students will be introduced to and practice stoichiometry skills, basic laboratory techniques and laboratory safety. Precipitation reactions and visible light spectroscopy will be introduced as techniques to analyze the composition of solutions qualitatively and quantitatively. A guided inquiry group project will practice the scientific process and culminates in writing an individual scientific report and a group oral presentation. Each student will also keep a laboratory notebook. Sections are offered at different times as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Enrollment limited to 16 per section. Corequisite: CHM 111

Crosslist(s): BCH, ENV
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: CHM 111 - Chemistry I: General
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab course accompanying CHM 111. Students will be introduced to and practice stoichiometry skills, basic laboratory techniques and laboratory safety. Precipitation reactions and visible light spectroscopy will be introduced as techniques to analyze the composition of solutions qualitatively and quantitatively. A guided inquiry group project will practice the scientific process and culminates in writing an individual scientific report and a group oral presentation. Each student will also keep a laboratory notebook. Sections are offered at different times as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Enrollment limited to 16 per section. Corequisite: CHM 111

Crosslist(s): ENV, BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: CHM 111 - Chemistry I: General
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab course accompanying CHM 111. Students will be introduced to and practice stoichiometry skills, basic laboratory techniques and laboratory safety. Precipitation reactions and visible light spectroscopy will be introduced as techniques to analyze the composition of solutions qualitatively and quantitatively. A guided inquiry group project will practice the scientific process and culminates in writing an individual scientific report and a group oral presentation. Each student will also keep a laboratory notebook. Sections are offered at different times as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Enrollment limited to 16 per section. Corequisite: CHM 111

Crosslist(s): BCH, ENV
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: CHM 111 - Chemistry I: General
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab course accompanying CHM 111. Students will be introduced to and practice stoichiometry skills, basic laboratory techniques and laboratory safety. Precipitation reactions and visible light spectroscopy will be introduced as techniques to analyze the composition of solutions qualitatively and quantitatively. A guided inquiry group project will practice the scientific process and culminates in writing an individual scientific report and a group oral presentation. Each student will also keep a laboratory notebook. Sections are offered at different times as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Enrollment limited to 16 per section. Corequisite: CHM 111

Crosslist(s): BCH, ENV
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: CHM 111 - Chemistry I: General
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab course accompanying CHM 111. Students will be introduced to and practice stoichiometry skills, basic laboratory techniques and laboratory safety. Precipitation reactions and visible light spectroscopy will be introduced as techniques to analyze the composition of solutions qualitatively and quantitatively. A guided inquiry group project will practice the scientific process and culminates in writing an individual scientific report and a group oral presentation. Each student will also keep a laboratory notebook. Sections are offered at different times as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Enrollment limited to 16 per section. Corequisite: CHM 111

Crosslist(s): ENV, BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: CHM 111 - Chemistry I: General
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab course accompanying CHM 111. Students will be introduced to and practice stoichiometry skills, basic laboratory techniques and laboratory safety. Precipitation reactions and visible light spectroscopy will be introduced as techniques to analyze the composition of solutions qualitatively and quantitatively. A guided inquiry group project will practice the scientific process and culminates in writing an individual scientific report and a group oral presentation. Each student will also keep a laboratory notebook. Sections are offered at different times as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Enrollment limited to 16 per section. Corequisite: CHM 111

Crosslist(s): BCH, ENV
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: CHM 111 - Chemistry I: General
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab course accompanying CHM 111. Students will be introduced to and practice stoichiometry skills, basic laboratory techniques and laboratory safety. Precipitation reactions and visible light spectroscopy will be introduced as techniques to analyze the composition of solutions qualitatively and quantitatively. A guided inquiry group project will practice the scientific process and culminates in writing an individual scientific report and a group oral presentation. Each student will also keep a laboratory notebook. Sections are offered at different times as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Enrollment limited to 16 per section. Corequisite: CHM 111

Crosslist(s): BCH, ENV
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 118L - Advanced General Chemistry Lab
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

This course is for students with a very strong background in chemistry. The elementary theories of stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding, structure, energetics and reactions are quickly reviewed. The major portions of the course involve a detailed analysis of atomic theory and bonding from an orbital concept, an examination of the concepts behind thermodynamic arguments in chemical systems, and an investigation of chemical reactions and kinetics. The course prepares students for CHM 222/223 and replaces both CHM 111 and 224. A student who passes this course cannot take either 111 or 224. Enrollment limited to 48. Corequisite: CHM 118L.

Crosslist(s): ENV, BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: CHM 118 - Advanced General Chemistry
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 226 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab Section for CHM 118.  This course is for students with a very strong background in chemistry and provides a foundation in basic lab technique, particularly for quantitative analytical measurements. It begins with an introduction to light as a tool for investigating aspects of chemical systems such as acid/base behavior and metal-ligand chemistry. The second half of the lab consists of a project module where students will develop greater independence in their chemistry skills while investigating the behavior of one particular chemical system in depth. Each student will also learn to keep a laboratory notebook, prepare scientific reports and presentations, and work safely in a chemical environment. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section.  Corequisite:  CHM 118.

Crosslist(s): BCH, ENV
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: CHM 118 - Advanced General Chemistry
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 226 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab Section for CHM 118.  This course is for students with a very strong background in chemistry and provides a foundation in basic lab technique, particularly for quantitative analytical measurements. It begins with an introduction to light as a tool for investigating aspects of chemical systems such as acid/base behavior and metal-ligand chemistry. The second half of the lab consists of a project module where students will develop greater independence in their chemistry skills while investigating the behavior of one particular chemical system in depth. Each student will also learn to keep a laboratory notebook, prepare scientific reports and presentations, and work safely in a chemical environment. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section.  Corequisite:  CHM 118.

Crosslist(s): BCH, ENV
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Coreq: CHM 118 - Advanced General Chemistry
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Friday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 226 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab Section for CHM 118.  This course is for students with a very strong background in chemistry and provides a foundation in basic lab technique, particularly for quantitative analytical measurements. It begins with an introduction to light as a tool for investigating aspects of chemical systems such as acid/base behavior and metal-ligand chemistry. The second half of the lab consists of a project module where students will develop greater independence in their chemistry skills while investigating the behavior of one particular chemical system in depth. Each student will also learn to keep a laboratory notebook, prepare scientific reports and presentations, and work safely in a chemical environment. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section.  Corequisite:  CHM 118.

Crosslist(s): ENV, BCH
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 80
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 223L - Chemistry III Lab: Organic Lab Enforced Requirements: CHM 222/222L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Material builds on introductory organic chemistry topics covered in CHM 222 and focuses more heavily on retrosynthetic analysis and multistep synthetic planning. Specific topics include reactions of alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers; aromaticity and reactions of benzene; and cycloaddition reactions including the Diels-Alder reaction. Prerequisite: CHM 222/222L. Corequisite: CHM 223L. ?

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 223 - Chemistry III: Organic Enforced Requirements: CHM 222/222L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 223 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab section for CHM 223. A continuation of CHM 222L where students will learn and use basic techniques of the organic chemistry laboratory.  Students will learn how to set up and run a distillation. Characterization of the product will introduce gas chromatography and continue to use IR, NMR and TLC techniques. This course will focus on mechanism studies where the students will be able to apply materials learned in the course to solve problems in the lab. The semester will end with a capstone project of their choosing.  Each student will write at least one laboratory report and keep a laboratory notebook.  Sections are offered at different times as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Enrollment limited to 16 per section. Prerequisites: CHM 222/222L (or equivalent). Corequisite: CHM 223. ?

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 223 - Chemistry III: Organic Enforced Requirements: CHM 222/222L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM / Ford 223 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab section for CHM 223. A continuation of CHM 222L where students will learn and use basic techniques of the organic chemistry laboratory.  Students will learn how to set up and run a distillation. Characterization of the product will introduce gas chromatography and continue to use IR, NMR and TLC techniques. This course will focus on mechanism studies where the students will be able to apply materials learned in the course to solve problems in the lab. The semester will end with a capstone project of their choosing.  Each student will write at least one laboratory report and keep a laboratory notebook.  Sections are offered at different times as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Enrollment limited to 16 per section. Prerequisites: CHM 222/222L (or equivalent). Corequisite: CHM 223. ?

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 223 - Chemistry III: Organic Enforced Requirements: CHM 222/222L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 226 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab section for CHM 223. A continuation of CHM 222L where students will learn and use basic techniques of the organic chemistry laboratory.  Students will learn how to set up and run a distillation. Characterization of the product will introduce gas chromatography and continue to use IR, NMR and TLC techniques. This course will focus on mechanism studies where the students will be able to apply materials learned in the course to solve problems in the lab. The semester will end with a capstone project of their choosing.  Each student will write at least one laboratory report and keep a laboratory notebook.  Sections are offered at different times as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Enrollment limited to 16 per section. Prerequisites: CHM 222/222L (or equivalent). Corequisite: CHM 223. ?

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 223 - Chemistry III: Organic Enforced Requirements: CHM 222/222L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 223 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab section for CHM 223. A continuation of CHM 222L where students will learn and use basic techniques of the organic chemistry laboratory.  Students will learn how to set up and run a distillation. Characterization of the product will introduce gas chromatography and continue to use IR, NMR and TLC techniques. This course will focus on mechanism studies where the students will be able to apply materials learned in the course to solve problems in the lab. The semester will end with a capstone project of their choosing.  Each student will write at least one laboratory report and keep a laboratory notebook.  Sections are offered at different times as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Enrollment limited to 16 per section. Prerequisites: CHM 222/222L (or equivalent). Corequisite: CHM 223. ?

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Coreq: CHM 223 - Chemistry III: Organic Enforced Requirements: CHM 222/222L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 223 Instructional Method: In-Person

Lab section for CHM 223. A continuation of CHM 222L where students will learn and use basic techniques of the organic chemistry laboratory.  Students will learn how to set up and run a distillation. Characterization of the product will introduce gas chromatography and continue to use IR, NMR and TLC techniques. This course will focus on mechanism studies where the students will be able to apply materials learned in the course to solve problems in the lab. The semester will end with a capstone project of their choosing.  Each student will write at least one laboratory report and keep a laboratory notebook.  Sections are offered at different times as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Enrollment limited to 16 per section. Prerequisites: CHM 222/222L (or equivalent). Corequisite: CHM 223. ?

Crosslist(s): BCH
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: (CHM 111/111L or 118/118L) & CHM 222/222L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Polymeric materials are ubiquitous in our society and play a vital role in many of the technologies that we use on a daily basis (e.g., clothing, electronic devices, drug formulations, medical implants). Chemistry is central to development of new materials for advanced technologies and this course will provide an introduction to the fields of polymer chemistry and macromolecular assembly. Topics include methods and mechanisms in polymer synthesis and assembly, characterization of polymer structure and properties, and applications of polymers. Special focus will be given to polymers used in biomedical applications. Prerequisite: CHM 111 or 118 and CHM 222. An understanding of basic chemical principles and an introduction to organic chemistry will be necessary for students to understand topics in polymer chemistry. Enrollment limit of 15.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: (CHM 118/118L or 224/224L) & (MTH 112 or 114)
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Quantum chemistry: an introduction to quantum mechanics, the electronic structure of atoms and molecules, with applications in spectroscopy. Prerequisites: 118 or 224 and MTH 112 or MTH 114; strongly recommended: MTH 212 or PHY 210, and PHY 115 or PHY 117.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: CHM 118/118L or CHM 224/224L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to some common environmental chemical processes in air, soil and water, coupled with a study of the crucial role of accurate chemical measurement of these processes. Lecture and laboratory featuring modern chemical instrumentation for spectroscopy (atomic and molecular) high performance chromatographic separations (both gas and liquid), electrochemistry as well as microwave- and ultrasound-assisted sample preparation, and a short project linked to local faculty research interests. Oral presentations and formal laboratory reports required. Prerequisite: CHM 224 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20.

Crosslist(s): ENV
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 10
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: CHM 118/118L or CHM 224/224L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:20 PM - 5:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to some common environmental chemical processes in air, soil and water, coupled with a study of the crucial role of accurate chemical measurement of these processes. Lecture and laboratory featuring modern chemical instrumentation for spectroscopy (atomic and molecular) high performance chromatographic separations (both gas and liquid), electrochemistry as well as microwave- and ultrasound-assisted sample preparation, and a short project linked to local faculty research interests. Oral presentations and formal laboratory reports required. Prerequisite: CHM 224 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20.

Crosslist(s): ENV
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 10
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: CHM 118/118L or CHM 224/224L
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:20 PM - 5:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to some common environmental chemical processes in air, soil and water, coupled with a study of the crucial role of accurate chemical measurement of these processes. Lecture and laboratory featuring modern chemical instrumentation for spectroscopy (atomic and molecular) high performance chromatographic separations (both gas and liquid), electrochemistry as well as microwave- and ultrasound-assisted sample preparation, and a short project linked to local faculty research interests. Oral presentations and formal laboratory reports required. Prerequisite: CHM 224 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20.

Crosslist(s): ENV
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to the principles and methodology of pharmacology, toxicology and drug design. The pharmacology of several drugs are examined in detail, and computational software is used to examine drug binding and to assist in designing a new or modified drug. Some of the ethical and legal considerations relating to drug design, manufacture and use are also considered. Prerequisite: BCH  252 or permission of the instructor.

Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 35
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to the structure, design and operation of the internet, including the electronic and physical structure of networks; packet switching; how email and web browsers work, domain names, mail protocols, encoding and compression, http and HTML, the design of web pages, the operation of search engines, beginning JavaScript; CSS. Both history and societal implications are explored. Prerequisite: basic familiarity with word processing. Enrollment limited to 35. The course meets for half of the semester only.


Second half of semester course.

Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 35
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

This introductory course provides students with a broad understanding of computer hardware, software and operating systems. Topics include the history of computers; logic circuits; major hardware components and their design, including processors, memory, disks, and video monitors; programming languages and their role in developing applications; and operating system functions, including file system support and multitasking, multiprogramming and timesharing. Weekly labs give hands-on experience. Enrollment limited to 35. This course meets for half of the semester only.


First half of semester course.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Offered as SDS 109/CSC 109. The world is growing increasingly reliant on collecting and analyzing information to help people make decisions. Because of this, the ability to communicate effectively about data is an important component of future job prospects across nearly all disciplines. In this course, students learn the foundations of information visualization and sharpen their skills in communicating using data. Throughout the semester, we explore concepts in decision-making, human perception, color theory and storytelling as they apply to data-driven communication. Whether you’re an aspiring data scientist or you just want to learn new ways of presenting information, this course helps you build a strong foundation in how to talk to people about data.

Credits: 5 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 8:00 AM - 9:15 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Introduction to a block-structured, object-oriented high-level programming language. Covering language syntax and use the language to teach program design, coding, debugging, testing and documentation. Procedural and data abstraction are introduced.

Credits: 5 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Introduction to a block-structured, object-oriented high-level programming language. Covering language syntax and use the language to teach program design, coding, debugging, testing and documentation. Procedural and data abstraction are introduced.

Credits: 5 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Introduction to a block-structured, object-oriented high-level programming language. Covering language syntax and use the language to teach program design, coding, debugging, testing and documentation. Procedural and data abstraction are introduced.

Credits: 5 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Introduction to a block-structured, object-oriented high-level programming language. Covering language syntax and use the language to teach program design, coding, debugging, testing and documentation. Procedural and data abstraction are introduced.

Credits: 5 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Explores elementary data structures (linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, graphs) and algorithms (searching, sorting) in a variety of contexts, including event-driven applications with a graphical user interface. Emphasizes object-oriented programming throughout, using the Java programming language. Prerequisite: CSC 111.

Credits: 5 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Explores elementary data structures (linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, graphs) and algorithms (searching, sorting) in a variety of contexts, including event-driven applications with a graphical user interface. Emphasizes object-oriented programming throughout, using the Java programming language. Prerequisite: CSC 111.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Reinforces programming skills learned in previous programming courses through working on a number of projects. Offers practice for developing modular, reusable, maintainable code. Students will gain more experience with design and development. Prerequisite: 212.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 32
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: CSC 212
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Tuesday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Introduction to software engineering theory and methodologies, with an emphasis on rapid prototyping and development. This course is a survey of topics: requirements elicitation and specification; prototyping and infrastructure; basic project management; architecture and design patterns; and verification and testing. Students will work in teams on a significant design and development project. Prerequisite: CSC 212.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to the architecture of the Intel Pentium class processor and its assembly language in the Linux environment. Students write programs in assembly and explore the architectural features of the Pentium, including its use of the memory, the data formats used to represent information, the implementation of high-level language constructs, integer and floating-point arithmetic, and how the processor deals with I/O devices and interrupts. Prerequisite: 212 or permission of the instructor.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Covers two-dimensional drawings and transformations, three-dimensional graphics, lighting and colors, game design, perspective, curves and surfaces, ray tracing. Employs Postscript, C++, GameMaker, POV-ray, and radiosity. The course accommodates both CS majors, for whom it is programming intensive, and other students with less technical expertise, by having two tracks of assignments. Prerequisites for CSC major credit: CSC 111 and MTH 111 or permission of the instructor; otherwise, CSC 111 or permission of the instructor.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Automata and finite state machines, regular sets and regular languages; push-down automata and context-free languages; linear-bounded automata; computability and Turing machines; nondeterminism and undecidability. Prerequisites: 111 and MTH 153.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: CSC 249
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

This course provides an introduction to the principles and practice of network security with a focus on both fundamentals and practical information. The three key topics of this course are cryptography, network security, and protecting information technology resources. Subtopics include ciphers, key exchange, security services (integrity, availability, confidentiality, etc.), network, and web based security attacks, vulnerabilities, exploits, countermeasures and responses. Students will complete several lab assignments experimenting with security countermeasures. Prerequisite: CSC 249.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Covers algorithm design techniques (“divide-and-conquer,” dynamic programming, ”greedy” algorithms, etc.), analysis techniques (including big-O notation, recurrence relations), useful data structures (including heaps, search trees, adjacency lists), efficient algorithms for a variety of problems, and NP-completeness. Prerequisites: 212, MTH 111, MTH 153.

Crosslist(s): SDS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only; Prereq: CSC 212
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Thursday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

When is disruption good? Who is responsible for ensuring that an innovation has a positive impact? Are these impacts shared equitably? How can we eliminate bias from algorithms, if they exist? What assurances can we make about the technology we develop? What are the limitations of professional ethics? This seminar examines the ethical implication (i.e., ethics, justice, political philosophy) of computing and automation. Participants will explore how to design technology responsibly while contributing to progress and growth. Topics include: intellectual property; privacy, security, and freedom of information; automation; globalization; access to technology; artificial intelligence; mass society; and emerging issues. Prerequisite: CSC 212.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Crosslist(s): SDS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Monday | 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM / Ford 345 Instructional Method: In-Person

Networked platforms like social media sites, gig sharing apps, and game consoles have become important sites of study for human-computer interaction. Contemporary research on the subject includes both platform studies, which offer a critical perspective on the power that large companies have to shape the creative labor and communication patterns of their users, and technology design activism, which seeks to amplify grassroots movements for positive social change on those platforms. In this course we will explore these emerging areas of scholarship and put our learnings into practice by using participatory design to create new technological interventions on various media platforms. 


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 40
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM / Crew House Instructional Method: In-Person

This course provides students with a practical and theoretical understanding of the relationship between the strength, flexibility, and mobility of the body. Through experiential methods students will learn how the connective tissues of the body function both as an interconnected web which facilitates movement, alignment, and coordination, as well as proprioception. We will develop an individualized practice throughout the semester drawing from various movement systems and dance training methods. We will examine the relationship between strength, flexibility, and agility as applied to dancing.

Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 1:10 PM - 2:35 PM / Berenson Studio Instructional Method: In-Person
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Scott Dance Studio Instructional Method: In-Person

Enrollment limited to 25.

Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / Scott Dance Studio Instructional Method: In-Person

For students who have taken Beginning Ballet or the equivalent. Enrollment limited to 25.

Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / Berenson Studio Instructional Method: In-Person

Enrollment limited to 30.

Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Scott Dance Studio Instructional Method: In-Person

This course serves as an accessible dance course for all students interested in dance, regardless of ability and dance experience. Throughout the semester, students are introduced to a variety of dance forms and approaches. The course promotes the development of dancing skills, aesthetic appreciation, community connection and cultural literacy. In these studio classes, students learn dance techniques while cultivating physical competencies, artistic creativity and bodily expressivity as a part of a community experience. Assignments, class discussions and movement material are designed to foster critical analysis of contemporary issues related to the interaction of dance and society.

Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 10:50 AM - 12:15 PM / Crew House Instructional Method: In-Person

This course introduces West African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various West African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art.


This section meets with DAN 242.

Crosslist(s): AFR
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM / Berenson Studio Instructional Method: In-Person

Hip hop is a popular form of Afro-diasporic cultural production and, for many, a lifestyle. In this studio course for beginner dancers, student learn movements from the poppin', lockin', house and breakin’ dance techniques. This study of movement vocabulary is contextualized in analyses of hip hop’s history, culture and current trends. Enrollment limited to 30.


This section meets with DAN 246-01.

Crosslist(s): AFR
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Wednesday | 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM / Berenson Studio Instructional Method: In-Person

This course introduces the students to the New York mambo style of salsa (beginner-level). It also covers elements of the Cuban style of salsa, representative of an Afro-Caribbean dance aesthetic. Students master different variations of the salsa basic step, as well as turns, connecting steps and arm work. They learn how to dance in couples and also in larger groups known as ruedas (wheels). Toward the end of the semester, students are able to use their salsa vocabulary as basis for improvising and choreographing salsa combinations. We approach salsa as a social dance form expressive of Caribbean culture and Latino culture in the United States. Most of the work takes place in the studio but, in addition to learning the dance, students read selected articles and watch documentaries about the dance genre. Class discussions and brief writing assignments serve as an opportunity to reflect on salsa’s history and culture. Enrollment limited to 30.

Crosslist(s): LAS
Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Instructional Method: In-Person

A laboratory course based on the preparation and performance of department productions. Students may elect to fulfill course requirements from a wide array of production related responsibilities, including stage crew. It may not be used for performance or choreography. May be taken four times for credit, with a maximum of two credits per semester.

Credits: 1 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Instructional Method: In-Person

Same description as DAN 200. May be taken four times for credit, with maximum of two credits per semester. Can be taken with DAN 200.

Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM / Berenson Studio Instructional Method: In-Person

This course offers an in-depth exploration of aesthetic and interpretive issues in dance performance. Through experiments with improvisation, musical phrasing, partnering, personal imagery and other modes of developing and embodying movement material, dancers explore ways in which a choreographer’s vision is formed, altered, adapted and finally presented in performance. May be taken three times for credit. Instructor permission and audition required.

Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:10 PM - 2:35 PM / Crew House Instructional Method: In-Person

Prerequisite: DAN 113 or previous dance experience. Enrollment limited to 30.

Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 1:10 PM - 2:35 PM / Scott Dance Studio Instructional Method: In-Person

Prerequisite: DAN 121 or previous dance experience. Enrollment limited to 25.

Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 10:50 AM - 12:15 PM / Crew House Instructional Method: In-Person

This studio course offers intermediate level technique training in any of the dance forms from Africa and the African Diaspora. The physical study of the form is contextualized socially, culturally and historically, favoring an interdisciplinary perspective. Through the course, students approach the study of dance as a catalyst for cultural empowerment and social change. Enrollment limited to 30.

Crosslist(s): AFR
Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Studio Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM / Berenson Studio Instructional Method: In-Person

Journey through time and experience in your own body the evolution of hip hop from its social dance roots to the contemporary phenomenon of commercial choreography that hip hop has become. Using film and text in addition to studio work, this class creates a framework from which to understand and participate in the global culture of hip hop dance. Enrollment limited to 30.


This section meets with DAN 146-01.

Crosslist(s): AFR
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / Crew House Instructional Method: In-Person

Course work emphasizes dance making, improvisation, and performance through generating and designing movement based studies and one fully realized performance project. Various devices and approaches are employed including motif and development, text and spoken language, collage and structured improvisation. Enrollment limited to 20.

Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Laboratory Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 4:10 PM - 5:00 PM / Crew House Instructional Method: In-Person

Course work emphasizes dance making, improvisation, and performance through generating and designing movement based studies and one fully realized performance project. Various devices and approaches are employed including motif and development, text and spoken language, collage and structured improvisation. Enrollment limited to 20.

Credits: 2 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM / Scott Dance Studio Instructional Method: In-Person

This course offers an in-depth exploration of aesthetic and interpretive issues in dance performance. Through experiments with improvisation, musical phrasing, partnering, personal imagery and other modes of developing and embodying movement material, dancers explore ways in which a choreographer’s vision is formed, altered, adapted, and finally presented in performance. Audition required. May be taken twice for credit. Instructor permission and audition required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 0
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Arts
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 2:45 PM - 4:45 PM / Scott Dance Studio Instructional Method: In-Person

This course offers an in-depth exploration of aesthetic and interpretive issues in dance performance. Through experiments with improvisation, musical phrasing, partnering, personal imagery and other modes of developing and embodying movement material, dancers explore ways in which a choreographer’s vision is formed, altered, adapted and finally presented in performance. In its four-credit version, this course also requires additional readings and research into broader issues of historical context, genre and technical style. Course work may be developed through existing repertory or through the creation of new work(s). May be taken twice for credit. Instructor permission and audition required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.