Skip to main content

Smith Alumnae Quarterly

Alumnae News

Home Is Where the Healing Is

Dr. Eliza (Pippa) Shulman ’96 is revolutionizing health care by reinventing the hospital.

  • Alumnae News
  • December 18, 2023
“In this moment, with President Willie-LeBreton’s arrival, I am inspired and full of hope to continue learning and practicing tenacity as we heal, build community, and work toward a more just and equitable campus.”
Vanessa Nicole Silva-Burgos ’24, president of the Student Government Association, on the occasion of the inauguration of President Sarah Willie-LeBreton

More Stories

Research & Inquiry

Clicking Beyond Mortality

A new book explores the intersection of death and the digital realm.

  • Research & Inquiry
  • December 20, 2023
Students

Supreme Lessons

Nicole Teo ’24J talks about her experience interning at the nation’s highest court.

  • Students
  • October 25, 2023
Nicole Teo standing outside of the Supreme Court
Research & Inquiry

Lost Pages, Found Voices

Uncovering the story of a forgotten feminist movement.

  • Research & Inquiry
  • December 20, 2023
Alumnae News

After the Fall

Afghan alums continue to show resilience in the face of Taliban rule.

  • Alumnae News
  • December 5, 2023
“There is often a symbiotic relationship between a college and its locale, but Smith and Northampton are deeply intertwined not just because of our place in the world but because of our shared values and our commitments to be good and responsible stewards of that world and to each other.”
Gina-Louise Sciarra ’96, mayor of Northampton

Smithies Create

It’s no secret that Smithies are creative. From luxury handbags to artisan cheeses to a plethora of books in all genres, check out some of the things Smithies have created lately.

Smithies Create

Reclaiming the Flag

Filmmaker Cynthia Wade ’89’s latest documentary, “The Flagmakers,” won a 2023 Emmy.

  • Smithies Create
  • December 20, 2023
Smithies Create

The Root of Life

Joy Hakim ’51’s new book, ”Discovering Life’s Story,” traces the beginnings of biology.

  • Smithies Create
  • December 20, 2023
Smithies Create

Analyze This

A popular podcast co-hosted by Deborah Clark Stewart ’65 provides Jungian analysis.

  • Smithies Create
  • December 20, 2023
Smithies Create

Back to the Future

”America Redux” isn’t just a history book, it’s also a bona fide work of art.

  • Smithies Create
  • December 20, 2023
Smithies Create

Look What You Made Me Do

Patty Friedmann ’68’s latest novel takes readers on a journey of emotion, desire, and redemption.

  • Smithies Create
  • December 20, 2023
Smithies Create

Need for Beads

These aren’t your grandmother’s brooches (though we’re sure those are lovely too!).

  • Smithies Create
  • September 25, 2023
Smithies Create

Cheese the Day

Tenaya Darlington ’94, aka Madame Fromage, goes from cheese blogger to book author.

  • Smithies Create
  • September 25, 2023
Smithies Create

The Way We Wore

Theatre professor Kiki Smith ’71 examines pieces from Smith’s Historic Clothing Collection.

  • Smithies Create
  • September 25, 2023
Smithies Create

Inspiring BIPOC Writers

Read, Write & Create, a podcast hosted by Lori L. Tharps ’94, offers “pep talks for BIPOC writers.”

  • Smithies Create
  • September 25, 2023
Smithies Create

Liquid Gold

Libellula olive oil, co-founded by Julia Franchi Scarselli ’18, expands its offerings.

  • Smithies Create
  • September 25, 2023
A photo of two smiling alums holding their baby daughter between them, smiling near a fence on a sunny day with a tree behind them.

Smithie Lives

A Happy Home in the Midwest

Just over a decade ago, Marissa Buie ’12, left, and Sora Harris-Vincent ’12 were undergraduates at Smith. Despite living in the Northampton area for several years, they didn’t truly connect until after graduation, thanks to being brought together by mutual friends. Marissa and Sora shared their first kiss on New Year’s Eve 2012, and today they live in Minnesota with their newborn daughter, Sylvan.

Photographed by Caroline Yang on October 29, 2023, at the couple’s little “garden oasis of a home” in Crystal, Minnesota.

Read More Class Notes

Submit Something

Have something to share for the next issue of the SAQ? Update your information, submit a class note, report an alum death, and more. We love to hear from you!

Submit something.

Change in SAQ Obituary Policy

The Smith Alumnae Quarterly recently revised its obituary policy. Beginning with the Summer 2024 issue, the magazine will continue publishing a comprehensive “In Memoriam” listing of deceased alums but will no longer print 100-word obituaries. The reasons for this change are addressed here.

Q: Will the names of deceased alums still be listed in the magazine?
A: Yes. The “In Memoriam” listing of deceased alums and faculty members will continue to appear in each issue of the magazine. You can view a recent example of the list in the online version of the magazine. There is also a section of Legacy.com specifically dedicated to obituaries of deceased Smith alums and other members of the Smith community, populated with notices published by a host of major newspapers. 

Q: What’s the reasoning behind eliminating 100-word obituaries?
A: Over the years, many readers, including family members of deceased alums, have expressed concerns about the fairness of the magazine’s obituary policy. They wondered why some alums are memorialized with 100-word obituaries while others are not. Magazine staff did not write these obituaries but instead published submissions from family members and friends of deceased alums. Recent data shows that only 20% of deceased alums—one in five—received an obituary in the magazine. Moreover, individuals were often frustrated by the magazine’s 100-word limit as well as the often long delay in printing obituaries because of our quarterly production schedule. We believe that running the “In Memoriam” list is the most appropriate and equitable way to recognize our deceased alums.

Q: Why is the magazine changing this policy now?
A: With the Summer 2024 issue, the magazine will debut a top-to-bottom redesign. It represents the first time the magazine has been redesigned in decades. Ceasing the publication of 100-word obituaries has been a topic of discussion for some time, but the decision to do so in tandem with the magazine’s redesign felt most appropriate. Celebrating the lives and accomplishments of our alums will continue to be the heart of the magazine’s mission.

Q: Can I still report the death of an alum?
A: Yes. The Smith College Office of Alumnae Relations accepts and fact-checks death notices from family members and friends of deceased alums. To report a death, use our web form or email the records department directly at smithierecords@smith.edu

Q: How else can alums honor deceased classmates?
A: Alums are welcome to submit a class note with a short reflection or memory of a deceased classmate or family member for possible inclusion in the magazine. (Please note, full obituaries will not be published in the class notes section.) We encourage class officers to publish classmates’ obituaries on Smith-hosted websites. And alums can find Smithie obituaries on the Smith community page of Legacy.com. Please be assured that the decision to run only the “In Memoriam” listing in the magazine was made after much thoughtful reflection and in the best interest of our readers.

Issue Archive

Scroll down and click on the cover of your choice, and click again to open the flipbook. For additional instructions, refer to the How to Use Our Digital Edition PDF. Mobile users: Visit the mobile site for the best experience.

Past Reads

Check out some articles from past issues of the Smith Alumnae Quarterly to see how members of the Smith community have been working to push the world forward.