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    14 cross listed courses found for the selected term.


  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 30
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 10:30 AM-11:50 AM / HILLYR GRAHAM

    During the formative periods when the local and global forces simultaneously took actions in shaping Chinese civilization, the functions of images and objects, the approaches to things, and the discourses around art underwent significant shifts, not only responding to but also mapping out the “Chinese-ness” in visual and material culture. This course of early Chinese art investigates diverse media—bronze vessels, sculptures, murals, textiles, architecture and other visual and material forms—in relation to political and military conquest, cross-cultural exchange, the dissemination of ordinary practices, and the formation of identities. Key terms/issues for the course will include expansion, connection, and materiality. Group A, Counts for ARU {A}{H}
    Linked Course: No
    EAS Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 22
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 2:40 PM-4:00 PM / HILLYR L19

    Topics course. Students may take up to four semesters of ARH 280 Art Historical Studies, as long as the topics are different. The course is an introduction to Buddhist grottoes of East Asia. We will learn the historical trajectories of Buddhist grottoes, including the development of cave architecture, mural painting, and sculpture. It pays special attention to the site specificity of the visual imageries, and their transmissions, commissions, and functions. The case studies in this course range from the Kizil Caves and Mogao Caves in Northwestern China, to the Yungang Caves and Longmen Caves in the central plains, and the Seokguram Caves in the Korean Peninsula. We will also consider the collecting, preserving and displaying of Buddhist grottoes in the contemporary world. Enrollment limit of 20. {A}{H}
    Linked Course: No
    BUS Crosslist, EAS Crosslist, REL Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 6
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 9:00 AM-10:20 AM / MCCONN 403

    Is it possible for someone who is not male to attain Buddhahood? We will explore this question from the textual perspectives of various Buddhist traditions. Buddhahood is the goal of Buddhism. The aspirant’s gender in tantric Buddhism is not relevant, but many other Buddhist traditions seem to deny the possibility of non-males achieving full awakening. We will address this question through study of canonical and modern literature on the topic. (E) 
    Linked Course: No
    EAS Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 11
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 10:30 AM-11:50 AM / SEELYE 306

    This survey of traditional Chinese fiction and drama from roughly 800–1900 reading classical tales of the strange, vernacular stories, novels, zaju and chuanqi drama alongside official narratives such as histories and biographies, as well as popular genres like ballads, baojuan (precious scrolls) and tanci (plucking songs). We consider the ways individuals, family, community and government appear in literature, along with the conflicting loyalties presented by romance, family and the state. All readings are in English translation; no previous knowledge of Chinese required. {L}
    Linked Course: No
    EAS Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 10
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 3:00 PM-4:20 PM / HATFLD 205

    A study of Japanese literature and its cultural roots from the eighth to the 19th century. The course focuses on enduring works of the Japanese literary tradition, along with the social and cultural conditions that gave birth to the literature. All readings are in English translation. {L}
    Linked Course: No
    EAS Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 12
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 1:10 PM-2:30 PM / HATFLD 203

    This course focuses on the writings of Japanese women from the 10th century until the present. We examine the foundations of Japan’s literary tradition represented by such early works as Murasaki Shikibu’s Tale of Genji and Sei Shonagon’s Pillow Book. We then move to the late 19th century to consider the first modern examples of Japanese women’s writing. How does the existence of a “feminine literary tradition” in pre-modern Japan influence the writing of women during the modern period? How do these texts reflect, resist and reconfigure conventional representations of gender? We explore the possibilities and limits of the articulation of feminine and feminist subjectivities, as well as investigate the production of such categories as “race,” class and sexuality in relation to gender and to each other. Taught in English, with no knowledge of Japanese required. {L}
    Linked Course: No
    EAS Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 8
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 1:10 PM-2:30 PM / HATFLD 205

    This course is a survey of modern Korean literature from the 1990s to the present. It charts the formal and thematic development of Korean literature by examining how literature illuminates Korea's history and politics. We will be engaged in the close reading of medium and full-length fictions in English translation, while considering their historical and cultural contexts. {L}
    Linked Course: No
    EAS Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 17
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 10:30 AM-11:50 AM / HATFLD 205

    This class explores modern Korean history from women's perspectives. It charts the historical and cultural transformation in modern Korea since the 1920s by coupling key terms of modern history with specific female figures: (1) Colonial modernity with modern girls in the 1920s and 30s; (2) colonization and cold-war regime with "comfort women" and "western princesses" from the 1940s to the 1960s; (3) industrial development under the authoritarian regime in the 1970s with factory girls; and (4) democratization and multiculturalism with rising feminists in the new millennium. {H}{L}
    Linked Course: Yes
    EAS Crosslist, FMS Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 7
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor PermissionReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 1:00 PM-2:30 PM / HATFLD 205

    Topics course This seminar will explore print and media cultures of the 16th through the 20th centuries in China and Japan. Students will read literary and popular works from China and Japan in the context of the cultural, intellectual, and technological transformations that defined these texts' creation, circulation, and reception. We will study historical and theoretical scholarship on topics such as vernacularity, the reading experience, and changing literacies for men and women. We will also consider how media developments shape the experience of Asian modernity. All readings in English translation. Prerequisite: at least one 200-level EAL course or instructor's permission. {L}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    EAS Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 21
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 1:10 PM-2:30 PM / SEELYE 208

    This course offers an analysis of the recent development of the Chinese economy, its rapid transformation in the post-Mao period, and the implications of this transformation for the welfare of Chinese households. Topics to be discussed include economic reform, trade liberalization, demography, inequality, health and environmental challenges. Fundamental topics in principles of economics will be covered in an intuitive way through topics pertaining to China. Course performance will be assessed through participation, in-class quizzes, literature critiques, and a final paper plus presentation. Prerequisite: ECO 150 and ECO 153. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    EAS Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 15
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 1:00 PM-2:50 PM / SEELYE 105

    China faces a range of environmental challenges in the 21st century: air pollution, water contamination, food scarcity, energy management and deforestation. The course considers these environmental issues, examining how they have come about; the Chinese response to them; their global impact; and the measures being proposed—and taken—to address them. Environmental issues are placed in the context of the social, economic and political changes that have occurred in China during the past few decades: economic growth, globalization, urbanization, population migration and media expansion. Finally, the course considers China’s traditional attitudes toward nature and the environment, and asks what role those attitudes play today. Enrollment limited to 18. {H}{N}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    EAS Crosslist, HST Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 20
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 2:40 PM-4:00 PM / SEELYE 208

    Analysis of Japan’s diplomacy and foreign policy since World War II. Emphasis on various approaches to the study of Japan’s external relations, and on contending national identities debated in Japan, including pacifist, neo-mercantilist, civilian, normative and normal nation images. Case studies focus on relations with the U.S., Europe, East through Central Asia and other non-Western regions. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    EAS Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 19
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 3:00 PM-4:20 PM / SEELYE 107

    The course explores the influence of Asian cultures on the diplomacy and negotiating styles of East and Southeast Asian countries. Specific countries include Japan, China, North Korea and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. Case studies are based on current and on-going regional and global issues. Enrollment limited to 20. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    EAS Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 11
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor PermissionReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Th 1:00 PM-2:50 PM / WRIGHT 002

    This seminar focuses on one of the world’s largest and most economically vibrant regions, Northeast Asia. Organized around a series of core themes in comparative politics—political economy, state-society relations, democratic transition and consolidation, and electoral politics—the course will compare domestic politics in Japan, South Korea, China, and Taiwan. In addition to gaining regional expertise, students will learn to conduct original research in comparative politics. Students will generate original research questions based on the course material, and produce a research paper comparing two or more countries (or multiple regions within a single country) with respect to their question of interest. Enrollment limit of 12. {S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    EAS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

The data in the course catalog are refreshed daily. Information concerning current and future course offerings is posted as it becomes available and is subject to change.

Smith College reserves the right to make changes to all announcements in the online Smith College Catalog Database, including changes in its course offerings, instructors, requirements for the majors and minors, and degree requirements. Course information contained herein is compiled and updated at regularly scheduled intervals by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty from data submitted by departments and programs. All data listed are as officially and formally approved by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty, the Committee on Academic Priorities and the faculty-at-large.