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You may search for courses meeting the criteria offered below. If a search results in too many courses, add criteria or select a more narrow category. If you searched only by department and term, cross-listed courses will be displayed at the bottom of the list.

    COURSE CATALOG SEARCH RESULTS

    5 courses found for the selected term.
    Click on a course title for more information.
    Click on a department code to view complete departmental listings.
    If you searched only by department and term, cross-listed courses will be displayed at the bottom of the list.


  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 10
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W F 10:50 AM-12:05 PM / HATFLD 107

    The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, all tenses and verbal aspect. By the end of the course, students are able to sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts, as well as develop an understanding of Russian culture through watching, discussing and writing on movies, short stories, folk tales and poems. This is a full-year course. Yearlong courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester. 
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 10
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 2:45 PM-4:00 PM / HATFLD 107

    Populated with many unique and eccentric characters — from revolutionary socialists to runaway human noses — nineteenth-century Russian literature displays a startling experimentation and innovation that advanced Russia to the vanguard of Western literature. Encompassing poetry, fiction, and journalism, this survey explores how authors such as Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov positioned literature at the center of public discourse, as a venue for addressing important philosophical, political, religious, and social issues, including gender and class relations; personal and national identity; and the role of the writer in public life.Conducted in English. No previous knowledge of Russian is required. {L}
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 12
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 10:50 AM-12:05 PM / MCCONN 103

    Same as REL 140. Often portrayed as hostile to the West, Vladimir Putin and the Russia he rules remain little known. Going beyond the headlines, this course examines contemporary Russia, and historical events and figures that have shaped Putin-era Russia. We will trace the culture wars that have ensued in this post-communist and post-atheist state, across historical documents, art, film, literature, and journalism. Topics include state power and political opposition; the resurgence of religion, and tensions between religion and the secular in the public sphere; debates over the Soviet past, including revolution, war and political terror; human rights and "traditional values." {H}{L}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    CLT Crosslist, REL Crosslist, WLT Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 6
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W F 1:20 PM-2:35 PM / HATFLD 107

    The first half of a two-semester sequence. Students practice all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types and different socio-cultural situations. Authentic texts (poems, short stories, TV programs, films, songs and articles) are used to create the context for reviewing and expanding on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. Prerequisite: RES 100Y or equivalent. {F}
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 13
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 2:45 PM-4:00 PM / HATFLD 107

    Explores the avant-garde film traditions of Eastern and Central Europe, including works from the Soviet Union, Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and Yugoslavia. The course focuses on how avant-garde filmmakers engaged with the socialist project in the USSR and Eastern Bloc, and its call for new forms, sites, and life practices. We will investigate how avant-garde cinema represents everyday life amidst the public and private spaces of socialism. In approaching the relationship between cinema and space, we will consider examples of architecture (Constructivist, Functionalist, Brutalist), as well as theoretical writings by and about the avant-garde. Conducted in English, no prerequisites. {A}{H}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    CLT Crosslist, FMS Crosslist, WLT Crosslist
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  • 4 cross listed courses found for the selected term.


  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 9
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 9:25 AM-10:40 AM / HATFLD 206

    This course focuses on the development of European democratic institutions in the context of military and economic conflict and cooperation. Includes an introduction to the process of European integration. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    RES Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 7
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor PermissionReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T 1:20 PM-4:00 PM / HATFLD 201

    Because of its claims to define culture, economy, and politics in the modern age, nationalism has become the subject of a multidisciplinary field which offers advanced students in an array of majors a capstone opportunity to consolidate and express what they've learned. How does nationalism today continue to underwrite political projects across the world? We will take this question as a point of departure and explore how to translate complex scholarly conversations about nationalism into public discourse interventions. The work in class will focus on writing, work-shopping, and revising the assignments designed in different formats of public discourse. {H}{WI}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    RES Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 23
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 1:20 PM-2:35 PM / SEELYE 202

    From dybbuks and schlemiels to radicals and revolutionaries, Yiddish literature and culture are more than Fiddler on the Roof. Explores Yiddish stories, novels, poetry, and drama as a site for political activism, ethnic performance, and creative expression in tsarist and revolutionary Russia, interwar Poland, and immigrant America. Why did Yiddish so often find itself at the bloody crossroads of art and politics? How have post-Holocaust engagements with Yiddish memorialized not only a lost civilization but also re-imagined a homeland in language? All texts in translation. No prerequisites. {L}
    Linked Course: No
    AMS Crosslist, CLT Crosslist, GER Crosslist, RES Crosslist, WLT Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 6
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 10:50 AM-12:05 PM / MCCONN 103

    Same as RES 140. Often portrayed as hostile to the West, Vladimir Putin and the Russia he rules remain little known. Going beyond the headlines, this course examines contemporary Russia, and historical events and figures that have shaped Putin-era Russia. We will trace the culture wars that have ensued in this post-communist and post-atheist state, across historical documents, art, film, literature, and journalism. Topics include state power and political opposition; the resurgence of religion, and tensions between religion and the secular in the public sphere; debates over the Soviet past, including revolution, war and political terror; human rights and "traditional values." {H}{L}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    CLT Crosslist, RES Crosslist, WLT Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

The data in the course catalog are refreshed daily. Information concerning current and future course offerings is posted as it becomes available and is subject to change.

Smith College reserves the right to make changes to all announcements in the online Smith College Catalog Database, including changes in its course offerings, instructors, requirements for the majors and minors, and degree requirements. Course information contained herein is compiled and updated at regularly scheduled intervals by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty from data submitted by departments and programs. All data listed are as officially and formally approved by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty, the Committee on Academic Priorities and the faculty-at-large.