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You may search for courses meeting the criteria offered below. If a search results in too many courses, add criteria or select a more narrow category. If you searched only by department and term, cross-listed courses will be displayed at the bottom of the list.

    COURSE CATALOG SEARCH RESULTS

    13 courses found for the selected term.
    Click on a course title for more information.
    Click on a department code to view complete departmental listings.
    If you searched only by department and term, cross-listed courses will be displayed at the bottom of the list.


  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 27
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 10:50 AM-12:05 PM / SEELYE 208

    An exploration of the religious texts and practices of major traditions (Hindu, Buddhist, Chinese, Jewish, Christian, Islamic) as well as those of smaller, more localized communities. Diverse forms of classical and contemporary religious experience and expression are analyzed through texts, rituals and films as well as through fieldwork. {H}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 10
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 1:20 PM-2:35 PM / SAGE 215

    The number of Americans who identify as spiritual, but who are not affiliated with any traditional religion, has doubled in the last twenty years. More than 20% of Americans now identify as “spiritual but not religious” (SBNR), and the number is growing. In this course, students will try to make sense of this phenomenon by studying what these Americans practice, such as mindful meditation, ethical eating, and forms of political activism. What is their lived experience? What counts as spirituality? Students will engage with primary and secondary sources on American SBNRs, and conduct original ethnographic research about spirituality at Smith. {S}
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 0
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 2:45 PM-4:00 PM / SEELYE 107

    Same as JUD 125. Who are the Jews? What is Judaism? How have Jews understood core ideas and texts, and put their values into practice, from biblical times until today? An interdisciplinary introduction to the dramatic story of Jewish civilization and its conversation with different cultures from religious, historical, political, philosophical, literary, and cultural perspectives, organized around different themes; the theme for fall 2019 is Food and Foodways. {H}{L}
    Linked Course: No
    JUD Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 6
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 10:50 AM-12:05 PM / MCCONN 103

    Same as RES 140. Often portrayed as hostile to the West, Vladimir Putin and the Russia he rules remain little known. Going beyond the headlines, this course examines contemporary Russia, and historical events and figures that have shaped Putin-era Russia. We will trace the culture wars that have ensued in this post-communist and post-atheist state, across historical documents, art, film, literature, and journalism. Topics include state power and political opposition; the resurgence of religion, and tensions between religion and the secular in the public sphere; debates over the Soviet past, including revolution, war and political terror; human rights and "traditional values." {H}{L}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    CLT Crosslist, RES Crosslist, WLT Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 10
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 2:45 PM-4:00 PM / SEELYE 204

    This course is an introduction to various approaches that have characterized the modern and postmodern critical study of religion. The course explores the development of the field, addressing fundamental theoretical and methodological issues as well as their implications. The first part of the course focuses on the interdisciplinary nature of religious studies, examining approaches found in disciplines such as anthropology, sociology, psychology and phenomenology. The second part examines the application of these approaches to the study of particular religious phenomena. {H}{S}
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 13
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 2:45 PM-4:00 PM / SEELYE 206

    Classic and contemporary discussions of the existence of God, the problem of evil, faith and reason, life after death, mysticism and religious experience. Readings from Plato, Anselm, Aquinas, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, William James and others. {H}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 7
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 1:20 PM-2:35 PM / HATFLD 202

    The literature of the New Testament in its broader historical, religious and cultural context. This course will emphasize literary genre, social-historical factors such as cultural identity in the Jewish Diaspora, and continuity with other religious traditions of the Greco-Roman Jewish world. Enrollment limited to 35. {H}{L}
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 10
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 9:25 AM-10:40 AM / SEELYE 107

    An exploration of Jewish women’s changing social roles, religious stances and cultural expressions in a variety of historical settings from ancient to modern times. How did Jewish women negotiate religious tradition, gender and cultural norms to fashion lives for themselves as individuals and as family and community members in diverse societies? Readings from a wide range of historical, religious, theoretical and literary works in order to address examples drawn from Biblical and rabbinic Judaism, medieval Islamic and Christian lands, modern Europe, America and the Middle East. Students' final projects involve archival work in the Sophia Smith Collection of Women's History. {H}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    JUD Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 13
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 10:50 AM-12:05 PM / BASS 204

    The literature of the various Gnostic sects within ancient Christianity, as evidenced by writings from the Nag Hammadi manuscript discovery and other sources. Particular attention to continuities with ancient Greek philosophy, and with other sapiential and apocalyptic traditions, both Jewish and Christian. {H}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 7
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 1:20 PM-2:35 PM / HATFLD 201

    The course introduces students to the mystical traditions in Islam (collectively known as Sufism), engaging them from academic, historical and phenomenological perspectives, and situating them within the broader Islamic religious traditions. The course contents include primary sources in translation and secondary studies. The first two weeks are devoted to the complexity of the study of religion, Islam and mysticism as academic categories. The course then focuses on mystical traditions and institutions,including interpretations of the Qurʾan and the prophet Muhammad’s life and teachings, mystical practices and theologies, and poetry. It concludes with an examination of Islamic mysticism today. {H}{L}
    Linked Course: No
    MES Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 11
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 2:45 PM-4:00 PM / SEELYE 105

    This course will explore classical and contemporary forms of Buddhist meditation theory and practice. It will examine both classical formulations and contemporary expositions with an eye to seeing how the theory and practice of Buddhist meditation are being adapted to fit the needs of people today. Enrollment limited to 25. {H}
    Linked Course: No
    BUS Crosslist, EAS Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 14
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 2:45 PM-4:00 PM / SEELYE 105

    The development of Buddhism and other religious traditions in Japan from prehistory through the 19th century. Topics include doctrinal development, church/state relations, and the diffusion of religious values in Japanese culture, particularly in the aesthetic realm (literature, gardens, tea, the martial arts, etc.) {H}
    Linked Course: No
    BUS Crosslist, EAS Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 10
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor PermissionReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T 7:00 PM-9:30 PM / SEELYE 204

    Topics course. 

    Many biblical texts question whether God consistently rewards the righteous and punishes the wicked. Prominent examples include Job, Ecclesiastes and certain Psalms, but similar ideas occur in the Torah and the Prophets. While focusing most deeply on Job, this course introduces students to an array of biblical and ancient Near Eastern texts, as well as some post-biblical and even modern literature, to illuminate the Hebrew Bible’s discourse surrounding this issue. {H}{L}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    ANS Crosslist, JUD Crosslist
    View Textbook Information
  • 6 cross listed courses found for the selected term.


  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 21
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 10:50 AM-12:05 PM / SEELYE 109

    What can anthropologists teach us about religion as a social phenomenon? This course traces significant anthropological approaches to the study of religion, asking what these approaches contribute to our understanding of religion in the contemporary world. Topics include religious experience and rationality; myth, ritual and magic; rites of passage; function and meaning; power and alienation; religion and politics. Readings are drawn from important texts in the history of anthropology and from contemporary ethnographies of religion. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    BUS Crosslist, REL Crosslist, SAS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 31
    Grade Mode: Satisfactory/UnsatisfactoryWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 7:00 PM-8:20 PM / HILLYR GRAHAM

    This course introduces students to the academic study of Buddhism through readings, lectures by Smith faculty and guests, and trips to local Buddhist centers. We critically examine the history of Buddhist studies within the context of numerous disciplines, including anthropology, art, cultural studies, gender studies, government, literature, philosophy and religion, with a focus on regional, sectarian and historical differences. Materials to be considered include poetry, painting, philosophy, political tracts and more. This course meets during the first half of the semester only. Graded S/U only.  {H}
    Linked Course: No
    REL Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 16
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 9:25 AM-10:40 AM / BURTON 101

    The United States is one of the most religiously diverse nations on earth. This course investigates thatdiversity, in the past and in the present, and explores traditions imported to America, recent traditionsborn in America, and/or traditions indigenous to the Americas. By doing so, this course engages howreligious traditions shape and are shaped by other forms of difference (race, class, gender, age, sexuality, etc.). As part of this study, students engage in original ethnographic research to document the religious diversity of the greater Springfield and Pioneer Valley region. Enrollment limited to 16. {H}{S} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    REL Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 15
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W F 10:50 AM-12:05 PM / BASS 204

    We examine what the Bible (and to some extent the broader Jewish and Christian traditions) have to say about controversial issues that have divided Americans in the past (e.g., slavery) and present (e.g., abortion). The aim is to give students the skills to assess critically various arguments that invoke the Bible or religious tradition and authority, wherever they come from on the political spectrum. Students are introduced to the Bible and biblical scholarship, as well as learn about different understandings of biblical authority and views of applying the Bible to contemporary political and ethical debates. This course counts toward the Jewish studies and religion majors. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students. {H}{L} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    JUD Crosslist, REL Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 10
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 2:45 PM-4:00 PM / SEELYE 107

    Same as REL 125. Who are the Jews? What is Judaism? How have Jews understood core ideas and texts, and put their values into practice, from biblical times until today? An interdisciplinary introduction to the dramatic story of Jewish civilization and its conversation with different cultures from religious, historical, political, philosophical, literary, and cultural perspectives, organized around different themes; the theme for fall 2019 is Food and Foodways. {H}{L}
    Linked Course: No
    REL Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 12
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 10:50 AM-12:05 PM / MCCONN 103

    Same as REL 140. Often portrayed as hostile to the West, Vladimir Putin and the Russia he rules remain little known. Going beyond the headlines, this course examines contemporary Russia, and historical events and figures that have shaped Putin-era Russia. We will trace the culture wars that have ensued in this post-communist and post-atheist state, across historical documents, art, film, literature, and journalism. Topics include state power and political opposition; the resurgence of religion, and tensions between religion and the secular in the public sphere; debates over the Soviet past, including revolution, war and political terror; human rights and "traditional values." {H}{L}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    CLT Crosslist, REL Crosslist, WLT Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

The data in the course catalog are refreshed daily. Information concerning current and future course offerings is posted as it becomes available and is subject to change.

Smith College reserves the right to make changes to all announcements in the online Smith College Catalog Database, including changes in its course offerings, instructors, requirements for the majors and minors, and degree requirements. Course information contained herein is compiled and updated at regularly scheduled intervals by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty from data submitted by departments and programs. All data listed are as officially and formally approved by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty, the Committee on Academic Priorities and the faculty-at-large.