Skip Navigation

Julia Child Day

Julia Child

 

With an annual event that has become a favorite among students, Smith celebrates the passion of alumna Julia Child, class of 1934. Author of a dozen cookbooks and host of the long-running PBS television series The French Chef, Child is credited with changing the way we think about food in America.

Julia Child Day is November 16

Julia Child’s recipes will be featured in the dining halls and at the Campus Center Café in celebration of the 14th annual Julia Child Day, Thursday, November 16. Students will enjoy eggs Benedict and chocolate croissants for breakfast; tuna pan bagnat, niçoise salad with pomme frites for lunch; and sautéed pork chops, garlic roast chicken, au gratin potatoes, haricots vert almondine, French onion soup, baked brie, creme brulée, cream puffs and cherries jubilee for dinner. The café will also be serving Julia’s recipes, including potato leek and French onion soups, coq au vin, pear and gorgonzola pizza and salmon niçoise. Bon appetit!

The first Julia Child Day, held in 2004, featured a panel discussion, “Julia Child: A Zest for Living,” a celebration of food, pleasure and culture. Various themes since then have included “How Communities Come Together Through Food” and “What I Learned in the Kitchen.”


About Julia Child

Julia Child ’34, author of a dozen cookbooks and host of the long-running PBS television series The French Chef, is credited with changing the way we think about food in America. Her book Mastering the Art of French Cooking provided culinary aspirants with one of the most accessible collections of French recipes available in English.

Child received the French Legion of Honor in 2000 and the U.S. Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2003. She received honorary doctorates from Harvard University, Johnson & Wales University, Brown University and, in 1985, Smith College.

Child donated her house in Cambridge, Mass., where she had lived from 1956 to 2001, to Smith. She donated her kitchen, which served as the set for three of her television series, to the National Museum of American History, where it is now on display.

Proceeds from the sale of the house supported construction of the Campus Center. An etching on a window of the Campus Center Café honors her generosity to the college.