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Julia Child Day

Tour of Campus

Professor of Art John Davis leads an architectural tour, discussing some of the college's influential buildings and how the campus has evolved since first opening its doors in 1875.

All lectures are free and open to the public.

Tuesday, December 13, 2016

Culture High and Low: When Jazz Entered the Concert Hall

5-6 p.m., Seelye Hall 106
Presented by Steve Waksman, Professor of Music and Sylvia Dlugasch Bauman Professor of American Studies

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Strange Bedfellows: How Feminists and Conservatives Influenced Sexual Violence Policy

5-6 p.m., Seelye Hall 106
Presented by Nancy Whittier, Sophia Smith Professor of Sociology


Julia Child

 

With an annual event that has become a favorite among students, Smith celebrates the passion of alumna Julia Child, Class of 1934. Author of a dozen cookbooks and host of the long-running PBS television series The French Chef, Child is credited with changing the way we think about food in America.

The first Julia Child Day, held in 2004, featured a panel discussion, “Julia Child: A Zest for Living,” a celebration of food, pleasure and culture. Themes since then have ranged from “How Communities Come Together Through Food” to “What I Learned in the Kitchen.”


About Julia Child

Julia Child ’34, author of a dozen cookbooks and host of the long-running PBS television series The French Chef, is credited with changing the way we think about food in America. Her book, Mastering the Art of French Cooking, provided culinary aspirants with one of the most accessible collections of French recipes available in English.

Child received the French Legion of Honor in 2000 and the U.S. Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2003. She received honorary doctorates from Harvard University, Johnson & Wales University, Brown University and, in 1985, Smith College.

Child donated her house in Cambridge, Mass., where she had lived from 1956 to 2001, to Smith. She donated her kitchen, which served as the set for three of her television series, to the National Museum of American History, where it is now on display.

Proceeds from the sale of the house supported construction of the Campus Center. An etching on a window of the Campus Center Café honors her generosity to the college.