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Study of Women & Gender

Archival photo of women marching for reproductive rights

The Program for the Study of Women and Gender examines gender, race, class and sexuality as important and simultaneous aspects of social worlds and human lives. Students examine the construction and operation of power relations, social inequalities and resistances to them in national, transnational, cultural, historical and political contexts. As an interdisciplinary endeavor, the program looks at how different academic disciplines view the operation of gender in the labor market, the family, political systems and cultural production. The study of women and gender is joined to an understanding of the forms of activism around the globe.

Photo above: March on Washington for Women’s Reproductive Rights, Washington, D.C. (circa 1989)
Loretta J. Ross Papers, Sophia Smith Collection, Smith College

Announcements

Creating Nuestra Música: Latinx Women in the Music Scene

For four consecutive Friday’s in April, seven women from Latinx music industry will open up their “studio” to Smith community. Share their work, talk about career trajectory, and challenges faced by gendered inequalities in their industry. Have a chance to converse with them, learn about their roles, and how to make a career in these fields. During two of the installments, there will be live music performances. Open to the public. Please register here

SWG Community

Requirements

Not every course that is cross-listed in the program or taught by SWG faculty will address all of these goals for the major in the Study of Women and Gender, but we expect that every graduating senior will have engaged these concepts and ways of thinking more than once during the course of the major. The goals of the major are to:

  • Understand the social construction of familiar or naturalized categories, while also acknowledging that these social constructions have real effects in subordinating groups and in marking bodies.
  • Understand and be able to apply the concept of intersectionality—a dynamic analysis of how the intersections of gender, race, class, sexuality, nationality, and other aspects of identity mutually and simultaneously constitute structures, social processes, ideologies and representations in the complex, multidimensional power hierarchies of society.
  • Analyze social change and understand agency and resistance.
  • Engage theory, read and write about theoretical texts, and recognize that theory emerges from different disciplinary locations.
  • Examine historical periods and beliefs different from the current moment.
  • Analyze forms of representation and discourse as they shape experience and shape our understanding of ourselves and of the world.
  • Approach problems and questions from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.
  • Engage in systemic analysis with attention to institutional and economic structures of power.
  • Understand theories of transnational, postcolonial and diasporic studies.
  • Understand feminist pedagogy and ethics of knowledge production.

Advisers

All members of the Program Committee for the Study of Women and Gender serve as advisers for the major and minor.

Requirements for the Major

The major requires the completion of 10 semester courses, including at least two 300-level seminars, totaling 40 credit hours. These courses shall comprise SWG prefix courses and department-based courses chosen from a list of possibilities compiled yearly by the Program for the Study of Women and Gender. These courses must include: 

1. SWG 150 Introduction to the Study of Women and Gender (normally taken in the first or second year; may not be elected S/U)
2. One course with a queer studies focus
3. One course with a race and ethnicity studies focus
4. One course with a transnational, postcolonial or diasporic studies focus
5. Four courses with the SWG prefix, including 150 and one 300-level seminar
6. Two 300-level courses (total)

A single course can be used to fill more than one of these requirements. Transfer students are expected to complete at least half of their major (or five courses) at Smith (or with approved Five College courses). Students with double majors may count a maximum of three courses toward both majors.

In the senior year, a student will complete a statement reflecting on the connections among the courses in their major. The senior statement and SWG advising checklist are due to the faculty adviser by the Friday prior to spring break.

Advisers

All members of the Program Committee for the Study of Women and Gender serve as advisers for the major and minor.

Requirements for the Minor

The minor requires the completion of six semester courses, totaling 24 credit hours from SWG-prefix courses or cross-listed courses. These courses must include:

1. SWG 150, Introduction to the Study of Women and Gender (normally taken in the first or second year, and which may not be elected S/U)
2. One course with a queer studies focus
3. One course with a race and ethnicity studies focus
4. One course with a transnational, postcolonial or diasporic studies focus

A single course can be used to fill more than one of these requirements.  Minors are strongly encouraged to elect at least one course at the 300 level.

Honors Requirements

A student may honor in SWG by completing an 8-credit, two-semester thesis in addition to the 10 courses in the major and fulfilling all the general requirements. Eligibility of students for honors work, and supervision and evaluation of the thesis, are determined by the Program Committee for the Study of Women and Gender.

SWG 430D Honors Project
An 8-credit, two-semester thesis in addition to the 10 courses that fulfill the major. Eligibility requirements for honors work, and supervision and evaluation of the thesis are determined by the Program Committee for the Study of Women and Gender.
Credits: 4
Members of the department
Normally offered each academic year

 

Special Studies

SWG 400 Special Studies 
For qualified juniors and seniors. Admission by permission of the instructor and director of the program. No more than 4 special studies credits may be taken in any academic year and no more than 8 special studies credits total may be applied toward the major. Credits: 1-4 
Members of the department 
Normally offered each academic year 


Courses

Spring 2021 SWG Courses

For more information, see the Smith College Course Search.

 

SWG 150 Introduction to the Study of Women and Gender
An introduction to the interdisciplinary field of the study of women and gender through a critical examination of feminist histories, issues and practices. Focus on the U.S. with some attention to the global context. Primarily for first- and second-year students. Enrollment limited to 25. {H}{S}  Credits: 4
Jina Boyong Kim

SWG 237 Meridians: Feminism, Race, Transnationalism 
This practicuum course is an academic complement to the work students interning with the Meridians journal as Praxis interns, Quigley Fellows, STRIDE Fellows, MMUF, Meridians interns, etc. will be doing. Run by the journal Editor, the class will discuss the scholarly, creative, artistic, archival and artistic work published in Meridians and how it is informed by - and contributes to - intersectionality as a paradigm and practice. Students will also become familiarized with feminist journal production processes and ethics, promotion and marketing strategies, co-curricular events planning and archival research. Instructor permission only. S/U only. Enrollment limited to 5.
Credits: 4 
Ginetta E. B. Candelario

SWG 238 Women, Money and Transnational Social Movements
Flickers of global finance capital across computer screens cannot compare to the travel preparations of women migrating from rural homes to work at computer chip factories. Yet both movements, of capital and people, constitute vital facets of globalization in our current era. This course centers on the political linkages and economic theories that address the politics of women, gender relations and capitalism. We will research social movements that challenge the raced, classed and gendered inequities, and the costs of maintaining order. We will assess the alternatives proposed by social movements like the landless workers movement (MST) in Brazil, and economic shifts like the workers cooperative movement. Assignments include community-based research on local and global political movements, short papers, class-led discussions & written reflections. {S} Credits: 4
Elisabeth Brownell Armstrong

SWG 241 White Supremacy in the Age of Trump 
This course will analyze the history, prevalence, and current manifestations of the white supremacist movement by examining ideological components, tactics and strategies, and its relationship to mainstream politics. We will also research and discuss the relationship between white supremacy and white privilege, and explore how to build a human rights movement to counter the white supremacist movement in the U.S. Students will develop analytical writing and research skills, while engaging in multiple cultural perspectives. The overall goal is to develop the capacity to understand the range of possible responses to white supremacy, both its legal and extralegal forms. Enrollment limited to 50. {H} {S} Credits: 4
Loretta June Ross

SWG 271 Colloquium: Reproductive Justice
This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of reproductive health, rights and justice in the United States, examining history, activism, law, policy, and public discourses related to reproduction. A central framework for analysis is how gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, disability and nationality intersect to shape people’s experiences of reproductive oppression and their resistance strategies. Topics include eugenics and the birth control movement; the reproductive rights and justice movements; U.S. population control policies; criminalization of pregnant people; fetal personhood and birth parents’ citizenship; the medicalization of reproduction; reproductive technologies; the influence of disability, incarceration and poverty on pregnancy and parenting; the anti-abortion movement; and reproductive coercion and violence. Prerequisite SWG 150 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20. {S} Credits: 4
Carrie Baker

SWG 290 Gender, Sexuality and Popular Culture
In this course we will consider the manner in which norms of gender and sexuality are reflected, reinforced, and challenged in popular culture. We use theories of knowledge production, representation, and meaning-making to support our analysis of the relationship between discourse and power; our engagement with these theoretical texts helps us track this dynamic as it emerges in popular culture. Key queer theoretical concepts provide a framework for examining how the production gender and sexuality impacts cultural production. Through our critical engagement with a selection of films, music, television, visual art, and digital media we will discuss mainstream conventions and the feminist, queer, and queer of color interventions that enliven the landscape of popular culture with which we contend in everyday life. Enrollment limited to 25. Prerequisite: SWG 150 or permission of the instructor. Credits: 4
Jennifer M. DeClue

SWG 300 Special Topics in the Study of Women and Gender: Women in the Criminal Justice System
This course will examine the social constructions of gender, race and class within the criminal justice system and explore gender, justice, and injustice through the lens of intersectionality. We will investigate the role that gendered experiences have in shaping the meaning of criminal "victim" and "assailant" under the law, and how crime and law enforcement policies and procedures impact the lives of women differently. In discussing women’s relationship to crime as both victims and offenders, we will also examine the intersections and relationships of those identified as women with structural racism, heterosexism, sexism, and class inequality. These issues are important because they help shape the gendered meaning of criminality and the navigation of gendered subjects within the criminal justice system. Not open to first-years and sophomores. {S} Credits: 4
Bridgette Baldwin   

SWG 303 Queer of Color Critique
Students in this course gain a thorough and sustained understanding of queer of color critique by tracking this theoretical framework from its emergence in women of color feminism through the contemporary moment using historical and canonical texts along with the most cutting-edge scholarship being produced in the field. In our exploration of this critical framework, we engage with independent films, novels and short stories, popular music, as well as television and digital media platforms such as Netflix and Amazon. We discuss what is ruptured and what is generated at intersection of race, gender, class and sexuality. Prerequisites: SWG 150. Enrollment limited to 12. {A}{S} Credits: 4
Jennifer M. DeClue

SWG 305 Queer Histories and Cultures
This course is an advanced seminar in the growing field of queer American history. Over the course of the semester, we will explore the histories of same-sex desire, practice, and identity, as well as gender transgressions, from the late 19th century to the present. Using a wide range of sources, including archival documents, films, work by historians, and oral histories, we will investigate how and why people with same-sex desire and non-normative gender expressions formed communities, struggled against bigotry, and organized movements for social and political change. This course will pay close attention to the intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality and the ways that difference has shaped queer history. Not open to first-years and sophomores. Prerequisite: SWG 150 and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. {H} Credits: 4
Kelly P. Anderson

SWG 377 Feminist Public Writing: Calderwood Seminar
This interdisciplinary course will teach students how to translate feminist scholarship for a popular audience. Students will practice how to use knowledge and concepts they have learned in their women and gender studies classes to write publicly in a range of formats, including book and film reviews, interviews, opinion editorials, and feature articles. We will explore the history and practice of feminist public writing, with particular attention to how gender intersects with race, class, sexuality, disability, and citizenship in women’s experiences of public writing. We will also some of the political and ethical questions relating to women’s public writing. Prerequisite: SWG 150 and one other SWG course. Cannot be taken S/U. {A}{S} Credits: 4
Carrie Baker

 

 

Spring 2021 Cross-Listed Courses

For more information, see the Smith College Course Search.

 

AFR 155 Introduction to Black Women’s Studies
Paul Joseph Lopez Oro

AFR 289 (C) Race, Feminism and Resistance in Movements for Social Change 
Paul Joseph Lopez Oro

AFR 360 Seminar: Toni Morrison
Daphne M. Lamothe

AMS 201 Introduction to the Study of American Society and Culture 
Evangeline M. Heiliger, Kevin L. Rozario

ANT 238 Anthropology of the Body 
Pinky Hota

ANT 257 Urban Anthropology 
Caroline M. Melly

EAL 273 Women and Narration in Modern Korea  
Irhe Sohn

EAL 273  F01 Women and Narration in Modern Korea  
Irhe Sohn

ENG 218 Monstrous Mothers
Lily Gurton-Wachter, Jina Boyong Kim

ENG 278 Asian American Women Writers
Ambreen Hai

ENG 323 Seminar: Toni Morrison
Daphne M. Lamothe

ENG 391 Modern South Asian Writers in English 
Ambreen Hai

ESS  340 Women’s Health: Current Topics 
Barbara Brehm-Curtis

GOV 267 Problems in Democratic Thought 
Gary L. Lehring

GOV 363 Dissent: Disobedience, Resistance, Refusal and Exit 
Erin R. Pineda

HST 267 (L) United States since 1877 
Paula Tarankow

HST 383 Research in United States Women’s History Domestic Worker Organizing
Jennifer Mary Guglielmo

PSY 266 Colloquium: Psychology of Women and Gender 
Randi Garcia

REL 238 Mary: Images and Cults 
Vera Shevzov

SOC 216 Social Movements
Nancy E. Whittier

SOC 237 Gender and Globalization
Payal Banerjee

SOC 253 Sociology of Sexuality: Institutions, Identities and Cultures 
William Cory Albertson

 

For Five College SWG courses, see https://www.umass.edu/wgss/spring-2021-course-guide

Martha Ackelsberg
William R. Kenan Jr. Professor Emerita of Government & Professor Emerita of the Study of Women & Gender

Paula Giddings
Elizabeth A. Woodson Professor Emerita of Africana Studies 

Marilyn Schuster
Andrew W. Mellon Professor Emerita in the Humanities (Study of Women & Gender) & Provost and Dean of the Faculty Emerita

Susan Van Dyne
Professor of the Study of Women and Gender and Chair of the Archives Concentration Emerita


Adviser: Elisabeth Armstrong

All students should work with their academic adviser to define their academic goals for study abroad before meeting with the SWG study abroad adviser.

Requirements

Minimum eligibility for study abroad: 3.0 GPA (some programs require higher) and program approval from your SWG adviser.

Study Abroad Programs

See the Office for International Study for Smith-approved programs.

Annual SWG Prizes

The Jeanne McFarland and Valeria Dean Burgess Stevens Prizes are awarded annually by the Program for the Study of Women and Gender and the Project on Women and Social Change for excellent work in the study of women and gender.

The Schuster Van Dyne Prize in Queer Studies is awarded annually by the Program for the Study of Women and Gender for excellent work in queer studies.

The Meg Quigley Prize is awarded annually for the best work in SWG 150 Introduction to the Study of Women and Gender.

 
Deadline

Submissions must be received by 4 p.m. on Thursday, April 30, 2020. 

 
Guidelines
  • Cover sheet must accompany all submissions.
  • Each student may submit no more than one paper (total) to the program for consideration in any given year.
  • Manuscripts on any aspect of the study of women and gender may be of any length and may have been previously submitted for courses.
  • Creative pieces or portfolios as well as analytic essays are appropriate for submission.
  • If your paper is a research paper, or one that uses sources, please be sure to cite those sources in an approved fashion (i.e., include footnotes and bibliography where appropriate). Include a brief description of the original assignment or reason for the paper (instructor, class, paragraph describing the assignment, etc.). Papers will be read and evaluated by a multidisciplinary committee, the members of which will not necessarily be aware of the context in which the paper was originally presented.
  • All papers should be paginated (i.e., each page should be numbered consecutively).
  • Only clean, unmarked papers should be turned in (i.e., without teacher's comments or grades).  
  • Electronic submissions should be sent to lhedger@smith.edu. Please send in word documents or pdfs. 
 
Questions?

Contact Carrie Baker.

Recent Prize Winners

2019-20

Jeanne McFarland Prize
Razi Esther Beresin-Scher '20
Clara Allene Kaul '20
Emily Jaie Luong '20

Valeria Dean Burgess Stevens Prize
Emma May Humphries '20
Marcela Rodrigues-Sherley '20

The Schuster Van Dyne Prize in Queer Studies
Liel C. Green '20

Meg Quigley Prize in Women's Studies
Willa Teays Goldman '23
Kara Louise Jackson '23
Marjorie Joan Shriver '22
Adrienne Tal Wander '23

 
2018-19

Jeanne McFarland Prize
Jenna Gilley ’19
Becca Tibbetts ’19

Valeria Dean Burgess Stevens Prize
Alexandra Eleazar ’20
Lauren Ramos ’21

The Schuster Van Dyne Prize in Queer Studies
Marcela Rodrigues-Sherley '20

Meg Quigley Prize in Women's Studies
Shelly Kira Kuper AC
Kathleen McGarry AC
Elisabeth Nesmith ’22
Kate Parkhurst ’22

SWG Research Grants for Students

SWG offers research grants to Smith students conducting research related to the study of women, gender and/or sexuality.

Eligibility: Any student may apply for SWG research grants. Priority will be given to SWG majors and minors, especially for research related to honors theses and special studies, but any Smith student may apply for a SWG research grant to support research related to the study of women, gender and/or sexuality.

Application Procedure: To apply for a SWG research grant, students should submit a proposal of 200–300 words describing their research project and how it relates to the study of women, gender and/or sexuality and an itemized budget to the director of the program, who will bring the proposal to the program committee for approval. Funds will be distributed from the Quigley Endowment.

Application Deadlines: September 15, February 15, May 1

Grant Amount: Up to $750 for domestic research and $1,000 for international research.

 

SWG Conference Attendance Grant for Students

Students wishing to learn more about the field of women, gender and sexuality studies may apply for funds to attend the National Women’s Studies Association annual conference or other SWG-related academic conferences. This grant may cover registration fees, travel, lodging and/or food.

Eligibility: Any student may apply for a SWG Conference Attendance Grant, but priority will be given to SWG majors and minors and to students who will be presenting SWG-related research.

Application Procedure: To apply for a SWG Conference Attendance Grant, students should submit a proposal of 200-300 words explaining their SWG background, indicating the conference they wish to attend and how it will expand their knowledge of the study of women, gender and/or sexuality, and an itemized budget to the Director of the Program, who will bring the proposal to the Program Committee for approval. Funds will be distributed from the Quigley Endowment.

Application Deadlines: September 15, February 15, May 1

Grant Amount: Up to $750 for domestic conferences and $1,000 for international conferences.

NOTE: Students are encouraged to also apply for NWSA’s Travel Grants and Registration Scholarships. In addition, SWG’s Institutional Membership in NWSA includes three complimentary student memberships annually. Please consult the SWG Director for details.


Quigley Research Fellowships

Quigley research fellowships are awarded on a competitive basis to SWG majors in their junior year to enable majors to work one-on-one with SWG faculty. The paid research fellowships each enable majors to participate in ongoing or new projects as part of a faculty member’s research or development of SWG course materials.

Majors will learn valuable research tools that will prepare them for advanced work in seminars or to propose honors theses.

Each fellowship award is $1,350 paid research assistance (or about 100 hours). The fellowships are available only during the academic year, but may be either for a semester or for two semesters. For example, a fellowship might require a commitment of 10 hours of work per week for a semester, or five hours a week for the academic year. Faculty proposals will identify their preferred timeframe.

In early spring of their sophomore years, majors can apply for one or more of these fellowship opportunities, and rank their choices.

Quigley Proposals for Fall 2021 and Spring 2022

Majors in the class of 2022 and 2023 may compete for a limited number of Quigley Research Fellowships for 2020–21. These paid research fellowships enable qualified juniors and seniors to work one-on-one with a faculty member in the Program for the Study of Women and Gender on a research or curricular project.

 

Reproductive Justice History in Action Project
(2) Full year fellowships, 5 hours a week
Prof. Joyce Follet

This Quigley Fellow will provide research and technical assistance to production of a web site entitled Roots of Reproductive Justice. The site consists of stories and archival evidence of the histories of Indigenous women, queer, low-income and women of color organizing for sexual and reproductive health, rights, and justice over 500 years in the US. The web site is part of an interactive toolkit of multimedia sources intended for use by today’s movement leaders, who are collaborating with digital designers and academic experts in developing this popular education resource. Students with interest and/or background in reproductive politics and anti-racist social movements are encouraged to apply. 

The work will draw upon the student’s interests and experience and will build skills in:
  • public history and digital scholarship
  • secondary and primary research, including archival research in the Sophia Smith Collection
  • digital project management, including organizing audiovisual and other materials
  • collaboration with community partners

 

Meridians: Feminism, Race, Transnationalism 
(2) Full year fellowships
Prof. Ginetta E. B. Candelario

he Quigley fellowship involves research assistance to the Editor and staff of the journal  Meridians, feminism, race, transnationalism. Work will include providing background information on various subjects published by the journal; helping to assess published articles for possible use in the undergraduate curriculum, and learning publishing-related tasks that will help the fellow to understand how to edit and/or prepare a scholarly journal for publication. Other tasks may include organizing information for the author/subject database and other general clerical needs of the journal. Students applying should be interested in the publishing process as well as the journal content and have sufficient technical skills to perform the required tasks.

Applicant preferences are as follows:
● Multilingual (any global language other than English)
● Any major of study welcome, so long as classes taken indicate a commitment to the study of women and gender, intersectionality, ethnic studies, and transnationalism among others.

In order to be considered for this position, a cover letter, resume, and contact information for two faculty references must accompany the application form.

 

Third Worldist Transnational Feminism Student-Faculty Research Project, 2021-22
Prof. Elisabeth Armstrong

Anticolonial feminist women’s movements in the mid-twentieth century sought to build a transnational feminism with truly emancipatory potential. Women from Asia, Africa and Latin America forged alliances with socialist women’s movements in the Second World, particularly women from Hungary, Bulgaria, East Germany and the Soviet Union. This Quigley research project will pull together current scholarship and research questions about these other origins of the transnational women’s movement, one that sought leadership by rural women in the postcolonial nations, spurred the United Nations to take women’s rights seriously, and forged the Convention on the Elimination Against All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). We will work with the Spatial Analysis Lab (SAL) to develop visual mappings of the conferences & build a website with archival materials.

 

 

Feminist Public Writing
Full year, 5 hours per week
Prof. Carrie Baker

This position will involve assistance in writing articles for Ms. Magazine and other media outlets on a range of current issues, including reproductive justice, sexual harassment and assault, and sex discrimination in employment and education. Responsibilities will include research, transcription of interviews, editing and social media promotion. This position provides opportunities to co-write articles for publication.

 

"Eurabia: Visions of Reverse Crusades and Counter-Colonization in European Culture."
Full year
Prof. Mehammed Mack

Seeking a student assistantto transcribe recorded ethnographic interviews in French. This is for an upcoming book manuscript called "Eurabia: Visions of Reverse Crusades and Counter-Colonization in European Culture." The interview questions address opinions about demographic change, and in particular, the Great Replacement Theory (the idea that Europe's historically white and Christian population is slowly being replaced by immigrants from Sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa, and the Middle East). You must have an advanced level of french (getting to the 300 course level at Smith).

 

 


How to Apply

To apply, submit a description of your interests, prior course work and research skills that qualify you for the fellowship of your choice on the application form below (if applying for more than one project, a separate form must be submitted for each).

You may apply for more than one project, but you may only receive a single fellowship for work with a single faculty member as a Quigley fellow (up to a maximum of 10-hours-a-week for one semester*, five-hours-a-week over two semesters, or a more intensive hourly work schedule over interterm, depending on faculty member's needs.)

*Accepting a 10-hour a week Quigley Fellowship means you may not hold another full-time campus job or STRIDE position.

Deadline

Quigley forms must be emailed to Lorraine Hedger by Friday, April 9, 2021. First priority will be given to SWG majors in the class of 2022 and 2023.


Graduate Programs

Ph.D. Programs

 
UNITED STATES

Arizona State University, Ph.D. in gender studies

Claremont Graduate University (Claremont, CA), Ph.D. and M.A. in women’s studies in religion

Emory University (Atlanta, GA), Ph.D. in women’s studies

Indiana University, Bloomington, Ph.D. in gender studies

Ohio State University, Ph.D. and M.A. in women’s, gender and sexuality studies

Oregon State University, Ph.D. in women's, gender and sexuality studies

Rutgers University (New Brunswick, NJ), Ph.D. in women’s and gender studies

Stony Brook University (Stony Brook, NY), Ph.D in women’s and gender and sexuality studies

Texas Woman's University, Ph.D. in multicultural women’s and gender studies

University of Arizona, Ph.D. in gender and women’s studies

University of Buffalo, Ph.D in global gender studies

University of California, Los Angeles, Ph.D. in gender studies

University of California, Santa Barbara, Ph.D. in feminist studies

University of California, Santa Cruz, Ph.D. in feminist studies

University of Kansas, Lawrence, Ph.D. in women, gender, and sexuality studies

University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ph.D. in women’s studies

University of Iowa, Iowa City, Ph.D. in women’s, gender and sexuality studies

University of Maryland, College Park, Ph.D. and M.A. in women’s studies

University of Michigan, joint Ph.D. programs in women’s studies and English, history, psychology, or sociology

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (with Center for Advanced Feminist Studies), Ph.D. in women’s, gender and sexuality studies

University of Washington, Seattle, Ph.D. and M.A. in gender, women’s and sexuality studies

Yale University (New Haven, CT), Combined Ph.D. in women's, gender and sexuality studies

INTERNATIONAL

Central European University, Budapest, M.A. and Ph.D. in gender studies (a Smith alum directs the program)

Josai International University, Ph.D. and M.A. in women’s studies

London School of Economics and Political Science, Gender Institute, England, Ph.D. and M.Phil. in gender studies; M.Sc. in gender and social policy

Manchester University, M.A. in women’s studies

Monash University (Melbourne, Australia, Ph.D. and M.A. in women’s studies

The Netherlands Research School of Women's Studies (NOV), Ph.D. in women’s studies at six Dutch universities

Simon Fraser University (British Columbia, Canada), Ph.D. and M.A. in gender, sexuality and women’s studies

University of Auckland, New Zealand, M.A. and Ph.D. in gender studies

University of British Columbia (Vancouver, BC, Canada), M.A. and Ph.D. administered by Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice

University of Melbourne (Melbourne, Australia), Ph.D. and M.A. in gender studies

University of Sussex (Brighton, UK), D.Phil. and M.A. programs in gender studies

University of Sydney (New South Wales, Australia), Ph.D. and M.A. (by research) in women’s studies

University of Toronto (Women and Gender Studies Institute), Ph.D. (Doctoral Program in Women and Gender Studies (DWGS)) and M.A. programs

University of Warwick, England, Ph.D. programs in women and gender; M.A. in interdisciplinary gender studies, gender and international development, or gender, literature and modernity

University of York (York, England), D.Phil., M.A., and M.Phil. programs in women’s studies

York University (Ontario, Canada), Ph.D. and M.A. in gender, feminist and women’s studies

 

Dual Degree J.D./M.A. Gender and Women’s Studies Programs

George Washington University, J.D./M.A. in women’s studies

Pace University and Sarah Lawrence College, J.D./M.A. in women’s history and law

State University of New York, J.D./M.A. women’s, gender and sexuality studies

University at Albany & Albany Law School, J.D./MA in Women's Gender and Sexuality Studies

University of Arizona, J.D./M.A. in women’s studies

University of Cincinnati, J.D./M.A. in women’s studies

University of Florida, J.D./M.A. in women’s studies

Other Gender and Law Programs

American University, Women and International Law Program L.L.M. in international legal studies with a specialization in gender and international law.

For more information, including law schools with feminist journals and women’s rights clinics, see this listing (pdf).

See also “Second-Degree Feminism,” Ms. Magazine (Fall 2014), p. 15.

M.A. Programs

UNITED STATES

Brandeis University (Waltham, MA), M.A. in women’s, gender and sexuality studies

Claremont Graduate University (Claremont, CA), interdisciplinary M.A. program in applied women’s studies

Clark Atlanta University (Atlanta, GA), M.A. in Africana women’s studies

DePaul University (Chicago, IL), M.A. in women’s and gender studies

Eastern Michigan University (Ypsilanti, MI), M.A. of liberal studies in women’s and gender studies (interdisciplinary)

Florida Atlantic University (Boca Raton, FL), M.A. and graduate certificate in women’s studies

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA), M.A. Interdisciplinary Studies with a concentration in women and gender studies

George Washington University (Washington, D.C.), M.A. in women’s studies; M.A. in public policy with a concentration in women’s studies

Georgia State University (Atlanta, GA), M.A. in women’s studies

Jewish Theological Seminary, M.A. in Jewish women’s studies

Loyola University, Chicago, M.A. in women’s studies, and a three-course graduate certificate; Mary Griffin Graduate Scholarship in WST available to one full-time graduate student in the program

Minnesota State University, M.S. in women’s studies

Ohio State University (Columbus, OH), M.A. in women’s studies

Roosevelt University (Chicago, IL), M.A. and graduate certificate in women’s and gender studies

San Diego State University (San Diego, CA), M.A. in women’s studies

San Francisco State University, M.A. in women’s studies

Sarah Lawrence College (Bronxville, New York), M.A. in women’s history

Simmons College (Boston, MA), Interdisciplinary M.A. program in gender/cultural studies

Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, M.A. in women’s studies and a graduate certificate in women’s studies

State University of New York, Albany, M.A. in women’s, gender sexuality studies

Texas Woman's University, M.A. in women’s studies

Towson University (Maryland), M.S. in women’s and gender studies

University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa M.A. in women’s studies

University of Cincinnati, M.A. in women’s studies

University of Florida, M.A. and M.W.S. in gender, sexuality and women’s studies

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, self-designed, interdisciplinary M.A. in women’s studies

University of Louisville, M.A. in women’s and gender studies

University of Memphis, interdisciplinary M.A. program in women’s studies

University of North Carolina, Greensboro, M.A. in women’s and gender studies

University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, M.A. in women’s studies

University of South Florida, Tampa, M.A. in women’s studies

University of Texas, Austin, M.A. in women’s and gender studies

University of Wisconsin-Madison M.A. in women's studies/gender studies

INTERNATIONAL

Manchester University, M.A. in women’s politics and policy research

Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s (Newfoundland, Canada), M.A. in gender studies

Mount St. Vincent University, Halifax (Nova Scotia, Canada), M.A. in women’s and gender studies offered jointly by Dalhousie, Mount Saint Vincent, and Saint Mary’s universities

Oxford University (England), One-year interdisciplinary master’s degree

Simon Fraser University, Burnaby (British Columbia, Canada), M.A. in women’s and gender studies

Trinity College at University of Dublin, The Centre for Women’s Studies offers the M.Phil. in women’s and gender studies, also welcomes applications from those wishing to do the M.Litt. and Ph.D. degrees, which are by research alone

University of Leeds, multiple post graguate programs at the master’s and Ph.D. levels in women’s, gender and sexuality studies in multiple contexts

University of Nijmegen (Netherlands), M.A. degree specializations, including feminist theology

University of Ottawa (Canada), collaborative program in women’s studies at the master’s level

University of Toronto (Canada), graduate collaborative program in women’s studies, M.A. and Ph.D.

University of Western Ontario (Canada), M.A. in women’s studies and feminist research

University of Wollongong (Australia), M.A. in women’s studies

University of York (England), standalone M.A. in women’s studies. Also offers M.A. in women’s studies by research and an M.Sc in women, development and administration


SWG Alumnae Network

SWG alumnae and current majors are welcome to search the SWG alumnae database.

  • Current majors can identify alumnae who have worked in their fields of interest or who have done graduate work or could provide tips about internships.
  • Alumnae can help prospective and current students see all that a major in women’s and gender studies has mattered and catch up with what classmates have been doing.
  • Members can create a profile and make information available for others to search (you control what information appears in search results).

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Contact

Program for the Study of Women & Gender

Seelye Hall 207A
Smith College
Northampton, MA 01063

Phone: 413-585-3390

Chair: Elisabeth Armstrong
Administrative Coordinator: Lorraine Hedger

Individual appointments can be arranged directly with the faculty.