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Study of Women & Gender

Archival photo of women marching for reproductive rights

The Program for the Study of Women and Gender examines gender, race, class and sexuality as important and simultaneous aspects of social worlds and human lives. Students examine the construction and operation of power relations, social inequalities and resistances to them in national, transnational, cultural, historical and political contexts. As an interdisciplinary endeavor, the program looks at how different academic disciplines view the operation of gender in the labor market, the family, political systems and cultural production. The study of women and gender is joined to an understanding of the forms of activism around the globe.

Photo above: March on Washington for Women's Reproductive Rights, Washington, D.C. (circa 1989)
Loretta J. Ross Papers, Sophia Smith Collection, Smith College

Important Academic Information for Spring 2020

In response to COVID-19, Smith College has implemented alternate modes of instruction for all academic courses for the remainder of the spring semester, as of March 30, 2020. Guidelines and information for academic continuity are available below. For general information, read the college’s FAQ about COVID-19 and visit the digital support for spring 2020 website.

Updates and information will be posted here as soon as they become available.

News & Announcements

 

The Presentation of the SWG Major was held via Zoom on March 31, 2020.

View the presentation here and learn about the opportunities in SWG.

 

Reinterpreting Margaret Sanger Through a Black Feminist Lens

Five College discussion with Loretta Ross, Joyce Follet and Joyce Berkman on February 13, 2020. Watch a video of the discussion.

 

Jill Liddington at Smith College

View her presentation on Anne Lister, aka Gentleman Jack.

 

SWG Community

Requirements

Not every course that is cross-listed in the program or taught by SWG faculty will address all of these goals for the major in the Study of Women and Gender, but we expect that every graduating senior will have engaged these concepts and ways of thinking more than once during the course of the major. The goals of the major are to:

  • Understand the social construction of familiar or naturalized categories, while also acknowledging that these social constructions have real effects in subordinating groups and in marking bodies.
  • Understand and be able to apply the concept of intersectionality—a dynamic analysis of how the intersections of gender, race, class, sexuality, nationality, and other aspects of identity mutually and simultaneously constitute structures, social processes, ideologies and representations in the complex, multidimensional power hierarchies of society.
  • Analyze social change and understand agency and resistance.
  • Engage theory, read and write about theoretical texts, and recognize that theory emerges from different disciplinary locations.
  • Examine historical periods and beliefs different from the current moment.
  • Analyze forms of representation and discourse as they shape experience and shape our understanding of ourselves and of the world.
  • Approach problems and questions from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.
  • Engage in systemic analysis with attention to institutional and economic structures of power.
  • Understand theories of transnational, postcolonial and diasporic studies.
  • Understand feminist pedagogy and ethics of knowledge production.

Advisers

All members of the Program Committee for the Study of Women and Gender serve as advisers for the major and minor.

Requirements for the Major

The major requires the completion of 10 semester courses, including at least two 300-level seminars, totaling 40 credit hours. These courses shall comprise SWG prefix courses and department-based courses chosen from a list of possibilities compiled yearly by the Program for the Study of Women and Gender. These courses must include: 

1. SWG 150 Introduction to the Study of Women and Gender (normally taken in the first or second year; may not be elected S/U)
2. One course with a queer studies focus
3. One course with a race and ethnicity studies focus
4. One course with a transnational, postcolonial or diasporic studies focus
5. Four courses with the SWG prefix, including 150 and one 300-level seminar
6. Two 300-level courses (total)

A single course can be used to fill more than one of these requirements. Transfer students are expected to complete at least half of their major (or five courses) at Smith (or with approved Five College courses). Students with double majors may count a maximum of three courses toward both majors.

In the senior year, a student will complete a statement reflecting on the connections among the courses in their major. The senior statement and SWG advising checklist are due to the faculty adviser by the Friday prior to spring break.

Advisers

All members of the Program Committee for the Study of Women and Gender serve as advisers for the major and minor.

Requirements for the Minor

The minor requires the completion of six semester courses, totaling 24 credit hours from SWG-prefix courses or cross-listed courses. These courses must include:

1. SWG 150, Introduction to the Study of Women and Gender (normally taken in the first or second year, and which may not be elected S/U)
2. One course with a queer studies focus
3. One course with a race and ethnicity studies focus
4. One course with a transnational, postcolonial or diasporic studies focus

A single course can be used to fill more than one of these requirements.  Minors are strongly encouraged to elect at least one course at the 300 level.

Honors Requirements

A student may honor in SWG by completing an 8-credit, two-semester thesis in addition to the 10 courses in the major and fulfilling all the general requirements. Eligibility of students for honors work, and supervision and evaluation of the thesis, are determined by the Program Committee for the Study of Women and Gender.

SWG 430D Honors Project
An 8-credit, two-semester thesis in addition to the 10 courses that fulfill the major. Eligibility requirements for honors work, and supervision and evaluation of the thesis are determined by the Program Committee for the Study of Women and Gender.
Credits: 4
Members of the department
Normally offered each academic year

 

Special Studies

SWG 400 Special Studies 
For qualified juniors and seniors. Admission by permission of the instructor and director of the program. No more than 4 special studies credits may be taken in any academic year and no more than 8 special studies credits total may be applied toward the major. Credits: 1-4 
Members of the department 
Normally offered each academic year 


Courses

Fall 2020 SWG Courses

For more information, see the Smith College Course Search.

 

SWG 150 Introduction to the Study of Women and Gender
This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of women, gender and sexuality studies. We will explore some of the key concepts and frameworks in the field and will develop critical tools for thinking about gender, sex, race, class, sexuality, citizenship and (dis)ability in a national and global context. Students will be exposed to the historical roots of feminist theory and action while engaging with contemporary movements for social justice. Primarily for first- and second-year students, the course includes lecture and discussion. Course is limited to 25. {H} {S} Credits: 4
Kelly Anderson
Jennifer DeClue

SWG 200 The Queer '90's
In this course we will immerse ourselves in the 1990s, looking specifically at the emergences and points of contention that made the ‘90s a queer, radical, deeply contested decade. The Queer 90s examines the moment in lesbian and gay studies when the recuperation of the term “queer” emerged. By engaging with the readings and films assigned in this course, students will gain an understanding of the AIDS crisis and the rage that mobilized ACT UP. Students will learn what the Culture Wars, Welfare Reform, and the conservative attacks against the National Endowment for the Arts have to do with one another. In order to grasp the charged feeling, the urgency, the upheaval of this era we will read foundational queer theoretical texts and analyze a selection of films from the movement known as New Queer Cinema. Prerequisite: SWG 150. {A} {H} {L} Credits: 4 
Jennifer DeClue

SWG 211 Girls in the System: Gender, Youth and Justice
This interdisciplinary course will consider the issue of gender, race, sexuality, and class in the juvenile justice system. Drawing on gender and sexuality studies, criminal justice, and sociological literature, social critiques, policy papers, case law, documentary film, personal narratives, and action, we will critically examine the history of the juvenile justice system; what it means to be in “the system”; the role of “justice” in the juvenile system; and review some of the major issues faced by the youth who are subject to this system. In addition, we will consider the role of youth action and resistance against the system. (E) {S} Credits: 4
Adina Giannelli

SWG 227 Feminist and Queer Disability Studies 
In the essay “A Burst of Light: Living with Cancer,” writer-activist Audre Lorde forges pioneering connections between the work of social justice and the environmental, gendered, and healthcare inequities that circumscribe black and brown lives. Following Lorde’s intervention, this course examines contemporary feminist/queer expressive culture, writing, and theory that centrally engages the category of dis/ability. It will familiarize students with feminist and queer scholarship that resists the medical pathologization of embodied difference; foreground dis/ability’s intersections with questions of race, class, and nation; and ask what political and social liberation might look like when able-bodiedness is no longer privileged. Prerequisite: SWG 150. Enrollment limited to 20.  {A} {L} Credits: 4
Jina Boyong Kim

SWG 241 White Supremacy in the Age of Trump
This course will analyze the history, prevalence, and current manifestations of the white supremacist movement by examining ideological components, tactics and strategies, and its relationship to mainstream politics. We will also research and discuss the relationship between white supremacy and white privilege, and explore how to build a human rights movement to counter the white supremacist movement in the U.S. Students will develop analytical writing and research skills, while engaging in multiple cultural perspectives. The overall goal is to develop the capacity to understand the range of possible responses to white supremacy, both its legal and extralegal forms. Enrollment limited to 50. {H} {S} Credits: 4
Loretta June Ross

SWG 267 Queer Ecologies: Considering the Nature of Sexualized Identities
What is learned by reading Queer Ecologies alongside Octavia Butler’s Lilith’s Brood? What does Over the Hedge have to do with environmental racism (Hamilton)? In short, these texts ask us to consider what it means to have a racialized and sexualized identity shaped by relationships with environments. We will ask: How is nature gendered and sexualized? Why? How are analytics of power mobilized around, or in opposition to, nature? We will investigate the discursive and practical connections made between marginalized peoples and nature, and chart the knowledge gained by queering our conceptions of nature and the natural. Enrollment limited to 18.  {H} {S} Credits: 4
Evangeline M. Heiliger

SWG 288 Immigration and Sexuality in France and Europe
This course analyzes the politics of sexuality in immigration debates in France and Europe, from the 1920s to the present. Students examine both cultural productions and social science texts: memoirs, psychoanalytical literature, activist statements, sociological studies, films, fashion, performance art, music videos, and dance forms. France has historically been the leading European host country for immigrants, a multiplicity of origins reflected in its current demographic make-up. Topics include: the hypersexualization of black, brown, and Muslim bodies, France as a Mediterranean culture, immigrant loneliness in Europe, intermarriage and demographic change, the veil and niqab, as well as sexual nationalism and homo-nationalism. May be taken with FRN 288. Enrollment limited to 35. {L} {H} {S} Credits: 4
Mehammned A. Mack   

SWG 321 Marxist Feminism
Marxist feminism as a theory and a politics imagines alternate, liberatory futures and critiques present social orders. Beginning with a simple insight: capitalism relies on the class politics of unpaid, reproductive “women’s work,” Marxist feminists in the 19th century sought to imagine new social connections, sexualities, and desire to overthrow patriarchy, slavery, feudalism and colonialism. Today, queer of color & decolonial feminist theory, alongside abolition, environmental, and reproduction justice movements rejuvenate this tradition of Marxist feminism. This seminar will focus on theoretical writings from around the world to better understand radical social movements from the past and the present. Prerequisite: SWG 150 and permission of the instructor.  {H} {L} Credits: 4
Elisabeth Brownell Armstrong

 

 

Fall 2020 Cross-Listed Courses

For more information, see the Smith College Course Search.

 

AFR 249 Black Women Writers
Daphne M. Lamothe

AFR 360 Seminar: Toni Morrison
Daphne M. Lamothe

EAL 242 Modern Japanese Literature
Kimberly Kono

ENG 275 Witches, Witchcraft and Witch Hunts
Andrea Stephanie Stone

ENG 323 Seminar: Toni Morrison
Daphne M. Lamothe

ESS 240 Exercise and Sport for Social Change
Erica S. Tibbetts

FMS 248 Women and American Cinema: Representation, Spectatorship, Authorship
Alexandra Keller

FMS 248 (F 01) Women and American Cinema: Representation, Spectatorship, Authorship
Alexandra Keller

FRN 230 Colloquium in French Studies: Banlieue Lit
Mehammed A. Mack

FRN 230 Colloquium in French Studies: French Calligraphies: Contemporary Chinese Women's Writings
Dawn Fulton

FRN 288 Immigration and Sexuality in France and Europe
Mehammed A. Mack

FYS 132 Girls Leaving Home
Ambreen Hai

FYS 179 Rebellious Women
Kelly P. Anderson

FYS 193 Red Devil and Pink Ribbons: Representations and Refutations of Cancer
Evangeline M. Heiliger

GOV 233 Problems in Political Development
Bozena C. Welborne

HST 263 (C) Aspects of Latin American History: Women and Gender in Latin America
Diana Sierra Becerra

HST 265 (L) Race, Gender and United States Citizenship, 1776-1861
Elizabeth S. Pryor

HST 267 (L) Race, Capitalism, Justice: United States since 1877
Paula Tarankow

HST 286 (C) Historiographic Debates in the History of Gender and Sexuality
Darcy C. Buerkle

HST 383 Research in United States Women’s History Domestic Worker Organizing
Jennifer Mary Guglielmo

MES 213 Sex and Power in the Middle East
Susanna Ferguson

REL 227 Women and Gender in Jewish History
to be determined

SOC 229 Sex and Gender in American Society
William Cory Albertson

SOC 236 Beyond Borders: The New Global Political Economy
Payal Banerjee

SOC 327 Global Migration in the 21st Century
Payal Banerjee

SOC 333 Social Justice, the Environment and the Corporation
Leslie L. King

SPN 230 02 Latin American and Peninsular Culture and Society: Creative Writing By and With Spanish Women Writers
Reyes Lazaro

SPN 255 Muslim Women in Film
Ibtissam Bouachrine

WLT 205 20th-Century Literatures of Africa
Katwiwa Mule

WLT 276 #Me Too: Sex, Gender and Power Across Cultures
Sabina Knight


For Five College SWG courses, see https://www.umass.edu/wgss/fall-2020-course-guide#t1.

Emeriti

Martha Ackelsberg
William R. Kenan Jr. Professor Emerita of Government & Professor Emerita of the Study of Women & Gender

Paula Giddings
Elizabeth A. Woodson Professor Emerita of Africana Studies 

Marilyn Schuster
Andrew W. Mellon Professor Emerita in the Humanities (Study of Women & Gender) & Provost and Dean of the Faculty Emerita

Susan Van Dyne
Professor of the Study of Women and Gender and Chair of the Archives Concentration Emerita


Adviser: Mehammed Mack

All students should work with their academic adviser to define their academic goals for study abroad before meeting with the SWG study abroad adviser.

Requirements

Minimum eligibility for study abroad: 3.0 GPA (some programs require higher) and program approval from your SWG adviser.

Study Abroad Programs

See the Office for International Study for Smith-approved programs.

Annual SWG Prizes

The Jeanne McFarland and Valeria Dean Burgess Stevens Prizes are awarded annually by the Program for the Study of Women and Gender and the Project on Women and Social Change for excellent work in the study of women and gender.

The Schuster Van Dyne Prize in Queer Studies is awarded annually by the Program for the Study of Women and Gender for excellent work in queer studies.

The Meg Quigley Prize is awarded annually for the best work in SWG 150 Introduction to the Study of Women and Gender.

Deadline

Items that cannot be submitted electronically may be submitted in hard copy to the program office, Seelye 207b.

Winners are notified by the dean of the college in writing and are announced on Commencement weekend at Last Chapel and at Convocation in the fall.

Guidelines
  • Cover sheet must accompany all submissions.
  • Each student may submit no more than one paper (total) to the program for consideration in any given year.
  • Manuscripts on any aspect of the study of women and gender may be of any length and may have been previously submitted for courses.
  • Creative pieces or portfolios as well as analytic essays are appropriate for submission.
  • If your paper is a research paper, or one that uses sources, please be sure to cite those sources in an approved fashion (i.e., include footnotes and bibliography where appropriate). Include a brief description of the original assignment or reason for the paper (instructor, class, paragraph describing the assignment, etc.). Papers will be read and evaluated by a multidisciplinary committee, the members of which will not necessarily be aware of the context in which the paper was originally presented.
  • All papers should be paginated (i.e., each page should be numbered consecutively).
  • Only clean, unmarked papers should be turned in (i.e., without teacher's comments or grades).  
  • Electronic submissions should be sent to lhedger@smith.edu. Please send in word documents or pdfs. Items that cannot be submitted electronically may be submitted in hard copy to the program office, Seelye 207A.
  • Submissions must be received by 10 a.m. Wednesday, May 1, 2019.
Questions?

Call 413-585-3390 or contact Carrie Baker.

Recent Prize Winners

2018-19

Jeanne McFarland Prize
Jenna Gilley ’19
Becca Tibbetts ’19

Valeria Dean Burgess Stevens Prize
Alexandra Eleazar ’20
Lauren Ramos ’21

The Schuster Van Dyne Prize in Queer Studies
Marcela Rodrigues ’20J

Meg Quigley Prize in Women's Studies
Shelly Kira Kuper AC
Kathleen McGarry AC
Elisabeth Nesmith ’22
Kate Parkhurst ’22

2017–18

Jeanne McFarland Prize
Priscilla Semphere ’18
Molly McQuire ’18
Barker Tucker ’18
Katrina Schroeder ’19

Valeria Dean Burgess Stevens Prize
Samantha Stolar ’18
Gretta Donckers ’18
Izzy Owen ’18

The Schuster Van Dyne Prize in Queer Studies
Zarah Ferrari ’18

Meg Quigley Prize in Women's Studies
Emily Ehrensperger ’21
Christine Qian ’21

SWG Research Grants for Students

SWG offers research grants to Smith students conducting research related to the study of women, gender and/or sexuality.

Eligibility: Any student may apply for SWG research grants. Priority will be given to SWG majors and minors, especially for research related to honors theses and special studies, but any Smith student may apply for a SWG research grant to support research related to the study of women, gender and/or sexuality.

Application Procedure: To apply for a SWG research grant, students should submit a proposal of 200–300 words describing their research project and how it relates to the study of women, gender and/or sexuality and an itemized budget to the director of the program, who will bring the proposal to the program committee for approval. Funds will be distributed from the Quigley Endowment.

Application Deadlines: September 15, February 15, May 1

Grant Amount: Up to $750 for domestic research and $1,000 for international research.

 

SWG Conference Attendance Grant for Students

Students wishing to learn more about the field of women, gender and sexuality studies may apply for funds to attend the National Women’s Studies Association annual conference or other SWG-related academic conferences. This grant may cover registration fees, travel, lodging and/or food.

Eligibility: Any student may apply for a SWG Conference Attendance Grant, but priority will be given to SWG majors and minors and to students who will be presenting SWG-related research.

Application Procedure: To apply for a SWG Conference Attendance Grant, students should submit a proposal of 200-300 words explaining their SWG background, indicating the conference they wish to attend and how it will expand their knowledge of the study of women, gender and/or sexuality, and an itemized budget to the Director of the Program, who will bring the proposal to the Program Committee for approval. Funds will be distributed from the Quigley Endowment.

Application Deadlines: September 15, February 15, May 1

Grant Amount: Up to $750 for domestic conferences and $1,000 for international conferences.

NOTE: Students are encouraged to also apply for NWSA’s Travel Grants and Registration Scholarships. In addition, SWG’s Institutional Membership in NWSA includes three complimentary student memberships annually. Please consult the SWG Director for details.


Quigley Research Fellowships

Quigley research fellowships are awarded on a competitive basis to SWG majors in their junior year to enable majors to work one-on-one with SWG faculty. The paid research fellowships each enable majors to participate in ongoing or new projects as part of a faculty member’s research or development of SWG course materials.

Majors will learn valuable research tools that will prepare them for advanced work in seminars or to propose honors theses.

Each fellowship award is $1,200 paid research assistance (or about 100 hours). The fellowships are available only during the academic year, but may be either for a semester or for two semesters. For example, a fellowship might require a commitment of 10 hours of work per week for a semester, or five hours a week for the academic year. Faculty proposals will identify their preferred timeframe.

In early spring of their sophomore years, majors can apply for one or more of these fellowship opportunities, and rank their choices.

Quigley Proposals for Fall 2020 and Spring 2021

Majors in the class of 2021 and 2022 may compete for a limited number of Quigley Research Fellowships for 2020–21. These paid research fellowships enable qualified juniors and seniors to work one-on-one with a faculty member in the Program for the Study of Women and Gender on a research or curricular project.

 

Reproductive Justice History in Action Project
(2) Full year fellowships, 5 hours a week
Prof. Joyce Follet

This Quigley fellow will assist in creating a digital toolkit of stories and evidence of the histories of women of color, indigenous women, queer women and low-income women organizing for reproductive health, rights and justice over 500 years in the United States. The interactive toolkit of multimedia sources is intended for use by today’s movement leaders, who are collaborating with digital designers and academic experts in developing this popular education resource.
The work will draw upon the student’s interests and experience and will build skills in:

  • a) public history and digital scholarship
  • b) secondary and primary research, including archival research in the Sophia Smith Collection
  • c) digital project management, including organizing audiovisual and other materials
  • d) collaboration with community partners

 

Meridians: Feminism, Race, Transnationalism 
(2) Full year fellowships
Prof. Ginetta E. B. Candelario

The Quigley fellowship involves research assistance to the editor and staff of the journal Meridians, feminism, race, transnationalism. Work will include providing background information on various subjects published by the journal; helping to assess published articles for possible use in the undergraduate curriculum; and learning publishing-related tasks that will help the fellow to understand how to edit and/or prepare a scholarly journal for publication. Other tasks may include organizing information for the author/subject database and other general clerical needs of the journal. Students applying should be interested in the publishing process as well as the journal content and have sufficient technical skills to perform the required tasks.

 

Third Worldist Transnational Feminism Student-Faculty Research Project, 2020-21
Prof. Elisabeth Armstrong

Anticolonial feminist women’s movements in the mid-twentieth century sought to build a transnational feminism with truly emancipatory potential. Women from Asia, Africa and Latin America forged alliances with socialist women’s movements in the Second World, particularly women from Hungary, Bulgaria, East Germany and the Soviet Union. This Quigley research project will pull together current scholarship and research questions about these other origins of the transnational women’s movement, one that sought leadership by rural women in the postcolonial nations, spurred the United Nations to take women’s rights seriously, and forged the Convention on the Elimination Against All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). We will work with the Spatial Analysis Lab (SAL) to develop visual mappings of the conferences & build a website with archival materials.

 

 

Women’s Rights Journalism
Full year, 5 hours per week
Prof. Carrie Baker

This position will involve assistance in writing articles for Ms. Magazine and other media outlets on a range of current issues, including reproductive justice, sexual harassment and assault, and sex discrimination in employment and education. Responsibilities will include research, transcription of interviews, editing and social media promotion. This position provides opportunities to co-write articles for publication.

 

National Domestic Workers Alliance Team
Fall semester at 10 hours per week
Prof. Jennifer Guglielmo

Join the small team of faculty who are working closely with the National Domestic Workers Alliance (NDWA), to help them build a political education curriculum rooted in history. Founded in 2007, the NDWA is a national alliance of over 60 affiliate organizations of nannies, housekeepers, and care workers, most of whom are women of color and immigrant women. Our team includes myself, Professors Michelle Joffroy (LALS/SPN) and Diana Sierra Becerra (HST/LALS). Work will include research assistance and general clerical needs. Students with  Interest in histories and cultures of organizing, social movements and anti-racist cultures and politics. Some familiarity with and/or interest in archival research, digital humanities and visual cultural production a plus. Basic Spanish competency (able to read, identify materials produced in Spanish, fluency not required) especially encouraged, but not necessary.

 

"Eurabia: Visions of Reverse Crusades and Counter-Colonization in European Culture."
Full year
Prof. Mehammed Mack

Seeking a student assistantto transcribe recorded ethnographic interviews in French. This is for an upcoming book manuscript called "Eurabia: Visions of Reverse Crusades and Counter-Colonization in European Culture." The interview questions address opinions about demographic change, and in particular, the Great Replacement Theory (the idea that Europe's historically white and Christian population is slowly being replaced by immigrants from Sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa, and the Middle East). You must have an advanced level of french (getting to the 300 course level at Smith).

 

SWG 288, “Immigration and Sexuality in France and Europe”
Fall semester
Prof. Mehammed Mack

Seeking a student assistant to create reading guides and presentations to assist my teaching in my upcoming SWG 288 class ("Immigration and Sexuality in France and Europe"). You would be reading two weeks ahead of the rest of the class, and coming up with questions that get to the heart of the readings, as well as pulling relevant images and quotes that the readings raise, eventually putting together Powerpoint presentations that I'll use as a teaching tool. You should have some experience of reading social science, historical, and if possible, theoretical texts.

 

 


How to Apply

To apply, submit a description of your interests, prior course work and research skills that qualify you for the fellowship of your choice on the application form below (if applying for more than one project, a separate form must be submitted for each).

You may apply for more than one project, but you may only receive a single fellowship for work with a single faculty member as a Quigley fellow (up to a maximum of 10-hours-a-week for one semester*, five-hours-a-week over two semesters, or a more intensive hourly work schedule over interterm, depending on faculty member's needs.)

*Accepting a 10-hour a week Quigley Fellowship means you may not hold another full-time campus job or STRIDE position.

Deadline

Quigley forms must be emailed to Lorraine Hedger by Monday, March 30, 2020. First priority will be given to SWG majors in the class of 2021 and 2022.


Graduate Programs

Ph.D. Programs

UNITED STATES

Arizona State University, Ph.D. in gender studies

Claremont Graduate University (Claremont, CA), Ph.D. and M.A. in women’s studies in religion

Emory University (Atlanta, GA), Ph.D. in women’s studies

Indiana University, Bloomington, Ph.D. in gender studies

Ohio State University, Ph.D. and M.A. in women’s, gender and sexuality studies

Oregon State University, Ph.D. in women's, gender and sexuality studies

Rutgers University (New Brunswick, NJ), Ph.D. in women’s and gender studies

Stony Brook University (Stony Brook, NY), Ph.D in women’s and gender and sexuality studies

Texas Woman's University, Ph.D. in multicultural women’s and gender studies

University of Arizona, Ph.D. in gender and women’s studies

University of Buffalo, Ph.D in global gender studies

University of California, Los Angeles, Ph.D. in gender studies

University of California, Santa Barbara, Ph.D. in feminist studies

University of California, Santa Cruz, Ph.D. in feminist studies

University of Kansas, Lawrence, Ph.D. in women, gender, and sexuality studies

University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ph.D. in women’s studies

University of Iowa, Iowa City, Ph.D. in women’s, gender and sexuality studies

University of Maryland, College Park, Ph.D. and M.A. in women’s studies

University of Michigan, joint Ph.D. programs in women’s studies and English, history, psychology, or sociology

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (with Center for Advanced Feminist Studies), Ph.D. in women’s, gender and sexuality studies

University of Washington, Seattle, Ph.D. and M.A. in gender, women’s and sexuality studies

INTERNATIONAL

Central European University, Budapest, M.A. and Ph.D. in gender studies (a Smith alum directs the program)

Josai International University, Ph.D. and M.A. in women’s studies

London School of Economics and Political Science, Gender Institute, England, Ph.D. and M.Phil. in gender studies; M.Sc. in gender and social policy

Manchester University, M.A. in women’s studies

Monash University (Melbourne, Australia, Ph.D. and M.A. in women’s studies

The Netherlands Research School of Women's Studies (NOV), Ph.D. in women’s studies at six Dutch universities

Simon Fraser University (British Columbia, Canada), Ph.D. and M.A. in gender, sexuality and women’s studies

University of Auckland, New Zealand, M.A. and Ph.D. in gender studies

University of British Columbia (Vancouver, BC, Canada), M.A. and Ph.D. administered by Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice

University of Melbourne (Melbourne, Australia), Ph.D. and M.A. in gender studies

University of Sussex (Brighton, UK), D.Phil. and M.A. programs in gender studies

University of Sydney (New South Wales, Australia), Ph.D. and M.A. (by research) in women’s studies

University of Toronto (Women and Gender Studies Institute), Ph.D. (Doctoral Program in Women and Gender Studies (DWGS)) and M.A. programs

University of Warwick, England, Ph.D. programs in women and gender; M.A. in interdisciplinary gender studies, gender and international development, or gender, literature and modernity

York University (Ontario, Canada), Ph.D. and M.A. in gender, feminist and women’s studies

University of York (York, England), D.Phil., M.A., and M.Phil. programs in women’s studies

Dual Degree J.D./M.A. Gender and Women’s Studies Programs

George Washington University, J.D./M.A. in women’s studies

Pace University and Sarah Lawrence College, J.D./M.A. in women’s history and law

State University of New York, J.D./M.A. women’s, gender and sexuality studies

University at Albany & Albany Law School, J.D./MA in Women's Gender and Sexuality Studies

University of Arizona, J.D./M.A. in women’s studies

University of Cincinnati, J.D./M.A. in women’s studies

University of Florida, J.D./M.A. in women’s studies

Other Gender and Law Programs

American University, Women and International Law Program L.L.M. in international legal studies with a specialization in gender and international law.

For more information, including law schools with feminist journals and women’s rights clinics, see this listing (pdf).

See also “Second-Degree Feminism,” Ms. Magazine (Fall 2014), p. 15.

M.A. Programs

UNITED STATES

Brandeis University (Waltham, MA), M.A. in women’s, gender and sexuality studies

Claremont Graduate University (Claremont, CA), interdisciplinary M.A. program in applied women’s studies

Clark Atlanta University (Atlanta, GA), M.A. in Africana women’s studies

DePaul University (Chicago, IL), M.A. in women’s and gender studies

Eastern Michigan University (Ypsilanti, MI), M.A. of liberal studies in women’s and gender studies (interdisciplinary)

Florida Atlantic University (Boca Raton, FL), M.A. and graduate certificate in women’s studies

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA), M.A. Interdisciplinary Studies with a concentration in women and gender studies

George Washington University (Washington, D.C.), M.A. in women’s studies; M.A. in public policy with a concentration in women’s studies

Georgia State University (Atlanta, GA), M.A. in women’s studies

Jewish Theological Seminary, M.A. in Jewish women’s studies

Loyola University, Chicago, M.A. in women’s studies, and a three-course graduate certificate; Mary Griffin Graduate Scholarship in WST available to one full-time graduate student in the program

Minnesota State University, M.S. in women’s studies

Ohio State University (Columbus, OH), M.A. in women’s studies

Roosevelt University (Chicago, IL), M.A. and graduate certificate in women’s and gender studies

San Diego State University (San Diego, CA), M.A. in women’s studies

San Francisco State University, M.A. in women’s studies

Sarah Lawrence College (Bronxville, New York), M.A. in women’s history

Simmons College (Boston, MA), Interdisciplinary M.A. program in gender/cultural studies

Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, M.A. in women’s studies and a graduate certificate in women’s studies

State University of New York, Albany, M.A. in women’s, gender sexuality studies

Texas Woman's University, M.A. in women’s studies

Towson University (Maryland), M.S. in women’s and gender studies

University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa M.A. in women’s studies

University of Cincinnati, M.A. in women’s studies

University of Florida, M.A. and M.W.S. in gender, sexuality and women’s studies

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, self-designed, interdisciplinary M.A. in women’s studies

University of Louisville, M.A. in women’s and gender studies

University of Memphis, interdisciplinary M.A. program in women’s studies

University of North Carolina, Greensboro, M.A. in women’s and gender studies

University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, M.A. in women’s studies

University of South Florida, Tampa, M.A. in women’s studies

University of Texas, Austin, M.A. in women’s and gender studies

University of Wisconsin-Madison M.A. in women's studies/gender studies

INTERNATIONAL

Manchester University, M.A. in women’s politics and policy research

Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s (Newfoundland, Canada), M.A. in gender studies

Mount St. Vincent University, Halifax (Nova Scotia, Canada), M.A. in women’s and gender studies offered jointly by Dalhousie, Mount Saint Vincent, and Saint Mary’s universities

Oxford University (England), One-year interdisciplinary master’s degree

Simon Fraser University, Burnaby (British Columbia, Canada), M.A. in women’s and gender studies

Trinity College at University of Dublin, The Centre for Women’s Studies offers the M.Phil. in women’s and gender studies, also welcomes applications from those wishing to do the M.Litt. and Ph.D. degrees, which are by research alone

University of Leeds, multiple post graguate programs at the master’s and Ph.D. levels in women’s, gender and sexuality studies in multiple contexts

University of Nijmegen (Netherlands), M.A. degree specializations, including feminist theology

University of Ottawa (Canada), collaborative program in women’s studies at the master’s level

University of Toronto (Canada), graduate collaborative program in women’s studies, M.A. and Ph.D.

University of Western Ontario (Canada), M.A. in women’s studies and feminist research

University of Wollongong (Australia), M.A. in women’s studies

University of York (England), standalone M.A. in women’s studies. Also offers M.A. in women’s studies by research and an M.Sc in women, development and administration


SWG Alumnae Network

SWG alumnae and current majors are welcome to search the SWG alumnae database.

  • Current majors can identify alumnae who have worked in their fields of interest or who have done graduate work or could provide tips about internships.
  • Alumnae can help prospective and current students see all that a major in women’s and gender studies has mattered and catch up with what classmates have been doing.
  • Members can create a profile and make information available for others to search (you control what information appears in search results).

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Contact

Program for the Study of Women & Gender

Seelye Hall 207A
Smith College
Northampton, MA 01063

Phone: 413-585-3390

Chair: Carrie Baker
Administrative Coordinator: Lorraine Hedger

Individual appointments can be arranged directly with the faculty.