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Master of Arts in Teaching

Classroom Desks with open Textbooks

The Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) is designed for students who are planning to teach in elementary, middle or high schools and for those wishing to do advanced study in the field of education.

The M.A.T. program combines study in the field of the student’s academic interest—the specific teaching field for students preparing to teach at the secondary- or middle-school levels, broader liberal arts and sciences subjects for students preparing to teach at the elementary level—with experience in teaching and the study of educational theory. The departments of biological sciences, chemistry, English, geology, history, mathematics and physics actively cooperate with the Department of Education and Child Study in administering the various graduate programs.

NEW: Summer education courses for teachers run from July 1 through August 2, 2019. Find course information below in Requirements & Courses.

Overview & Admission

The Program

Students who follow the master of arts in teaching program will, in the course of an intensive five-week summer session and a full-time academic year, be able to complete the state-approved program in teacher education enabling them to meet the requirements for licensure in various states.

Local Fieldwork Placements

The Department of Education and Child Study uses a variety of schools and settings to provide opportunities for observation, service learning and classroom teaching experiences. These include the Smith College Campus School, public schools in Northampton and other area communities, as well as several private schools.

More Information

If you have questions about the M.A.T. program, please contact Gina Wyman, coordinator of teacher education.

If you have questions about the admission and application process, please contact Ruth Morgan, director of graduate & special programs.

Admission prerequisites and course requirements vary depending upon the specific program.

Prospective candidates should have a superior undergraduate record and should present evidence of personal qualifications for effective teaching. Those interested in the M.A.T. in secondary or middle school teaching should also possess an appropriate concentration—normally a major—in the subject of the teaching field. All applicants should submit a paper or other piece of work that is illustrative of their writing. Applicants with teaching experience should include a letter of recommendation concerning their teaching.

To qualify for a degree, the candidate must obtain a grade of B- or better in all courses or seminars, although a grade of C in one four-credit course may be permitted on departmental recommendation. Courses for graduate credit may not be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Apply to the M.A.T. Program

 

If you have questions about the application process, please contact Ruth Morgan, director of graduate & special programs.


Requirements & Courses

  • Understand the role of cultural and human diversity in the design and practice of education.
  • Understand current theories of learning and how they shape principles of pedagogical practice across ages and subject matter.
  • Understand current theories of human development—infancy through adolescence.
  • Understand the major factors that influence the design of learning environments.
  • Develop applied and practical knowledge and skill to support the growth and success of beginning teachers. (These learning goals are elaborated in the description of our state approved teacher preparation programs.)

Elementary Level (Grades 1–6)

A minimum of 32 semester hours and final course grades of B- or better are required for completion of the M.A.T. degree. Graduate students pursuing Massachusetts Educator Licensure at the elementary level are required to participate in the summer semester.

Professional Teaching Knowledge (Pedagogy) Requirements
  • EDC 338 Children Learning to Read
  • EDC 548 Student Diversity and Classroom Teaching
  • EDC 552 Perspectives on American Education
  • EDC 554 Cognition and Instructional Design
  • EDC 556s Teaching and Learning
  • EDC 559 & 559s Clinical Internship in Teaching
Subject Matter Knowledge

All students seeking Massachusetts Educator Licensure must have an undergraduate major in the liberal arts and sciences. Upon entering the M.A.T. program, the student and adviser will review the student’s undergraduate transcript for subject matter preparation in the following areas:

Literature
  • Must include American, British and world literature
History
  • Must include U.S. history, colonial to present, and/or American government, including the founding documents
  • World history and European history, ancient to present
Natural Science
  • Must include one lab science
Mathematics
  • Must include two college-level math courses
Social Sciences
  • Must include the studies of economics and geography
Electives
  • EDC 336 Seminar in American Education: John Dewey and His World
  • EDC 342 Growing Up American: Adolescents and Their Educational Institutions
  • EDC 343 Multicultural Education
  • EDC 350 Learning Disabilities
  • EDC 325 The Teaching of Writing
  • EDC 333 Information Technology and Learning
  • EDC 305 The Teaching of Visual Art in the Classroom
  • HST 390 Teaching History
  • ENG 399 Teaching Literature

Secondary-Level (Grades 5–12)

A minimum of 32 semester hours and final course grades of B- or better are required for completion of the M.A.T. degree. Graduate students pursuing Massachusetts Educator Licensure at the elementary level are required to participate in the summer semester.

Professional Teaching Knowledge (Pedagogy) Requirements
  • EDC 556s Thinking About Learning (summer)
  • EDC 559s Intern Teaching (summer)
  • EDC 548 Student Diversity and Classroom Teaching
  • EDC 352 Reflective Practice in Secondary Schools
  • EDC 559 Clinical Internship (student teaching)
  • EDC 552 Perspectives in American Education
  • EDC 554 Cognition and Instruction
Subject Matter Knowledge

Students must have an undergraduate major in the liberal arts or sciences.

All candidates must meet subject matter knowledge requirements identified by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Students work with advisers from the department to choose subject matter courses that complete the requirements for subject matter knowledge in the subject/area they seek licensure.

Teaching Practicum

Students complete their teaching practicum in one semester, teaching daily, from 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Workload

Students are encouraged to take only three courses during their student teaching semester.

Smith College is pleased to offer graduate courses during the summer, available to M.A.T. students, area teachers and those studying education at other institutions. In our five-week summer session, teachers can earn four or eight credits (90–180 PDPs). Teachers successfully completing EDC 511 will earn their Sheltered English Immersion Endorsement in Massachusetts.


For More Information

Questions about the summer offerings should be directed to Gina Wyman, coordinator of teacher education, 413-585-4650.


Courses Offered

New Program: Additional Licensure in Special Education/Moderate Disabilities (PK-8 or 5-12)

The following two special education courses provide the necessary competencies for additional licensure in moderate disabilities. Individuals who hold initial or professional teaching licenses and complete both EDC 550 and EDC 551, take the appropriate MTELs, and complete a 150 practicum or internship with a licensed teacher in moderate disabilities are eligible to apply to the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education for an additional license in moderate disabilities, grades PK-8 or 5-12.

EDC 550 The Policies and Procedures of Inclusion
Monday/Wednesday 1:30–5 p.m.

This course will focus on the laws and policies governing special education, including eligibility categories and determinations, testing and creating useful assessment reports, progress monitoring, writing and implementing IEP and 504 plans, working collaboratively with agencies and other service providers, and assistive technology. Credits: 4

EDC 551 The Inclusive Classroom: Designing Effective Instruction
Tuesday/Thursday 1:30–5 p.m.

This course will focus on the models of instructional practice for students with mild to moderate disabilities, including models of co-teaching and inclusion, differentiated instruction, universal design, positive behavioral supports and effective classroom management practices. Students will learn strategies for supporting students in reading, writing, and mathematics, as well as with executive function and study skills. This course requires fieldwork in an inclusive classroom. Credits: 4

SEI Endorsement Course

EDC 511: Rethinking Equity and Teaching for English Language Learners
Monday/Wednesday 2–5:30 p.m. and Friday 9 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

This course prepares teachers to shelter their English language instruction by increasing their knowledge of student variation and cultural considerations, second language acquisition theory, English language arts/literacy, English language development standards and assessments, and effective practices in English language learner (ELL) instruction. Participants learn to tailor their instruction for ELLs by including rigorous academic language and vocabulary development, readings of complex grade-level informational and literary texts, and discussion and writing in response to texts, and also by developing content standards for various academic disciplines. This course requires fieldwork with English language learners. Successful completion of this course leads to the Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) endorsement. Credits: 4

EDC 556: Learning in Classrooms
Tuesday/Thursday 2–5 p.m.

What makes a good teacher? What makes a good student? This course combines perspectives on child and adolescent development with cognitive science to examine how principles of educational psychology can be applied to the classroom. Students will critically read educational research and apply major course concepts to case studies. This course requires fieldwork. Credits: 4


Summer Program Tuition Fee

For one or two courses: $2,500, 4 credits per course

Requirements for Admission

How To Apply

Application materials can be submitted to: Ruth Morgan, Office of Graduate and Special Program, 413-585-3053

All required materials must be received by June 1, 2019.

Please be aware that the tuition fee must be paid in full before registration can be completed

 

Contact

Department of Education & Child Study

Morgan Hall
Smith College
Northampton, MA 01063

Phone: 413-585-4650
For more information about the M.A.T. program, contact Gina Wyman, coordinator of teacher education. For admission information, contact Ruth Morgan, director of graduate & special programs.