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Teaching Arts at Lunchtime Events

Professor Suleiman Mourad teaching a class
 

Please join us on Fridays for discussions focused on teaching and learning at Smith. Some of our lunchtime events may be held over Zoom: stay tuned for more details.  


Schedule of Sherrerd Friday Events for Spring 2022

Please RSVP for our events by visiting the forms below; we'll collect RSVPs for all events. The first couple of Fridays will be over Zoom and then we plan to be in person in Neilson Browsing Room. In either case, with RSVPs, we will know to send a Zoom link if needed and a calendar invitation and if we are in person, we can better plan for lunch and seating, as well as reduce waste and better utilize valuable resources. Most presentations will occur from 12:20-1:15 pm with lunch available beforehand beginning at noon for in-person events.


Friday, January 28, 2022 –  Democratizing the Classroom Part I
12:20-1:15 over Zoom

Sara Pruss, Patty DiBartolo, Caroline Melly (Sherrerd Center); Alex Keller (Kahn Institute); Magdalena Zapędowska (Jacobson Center); and Candice Price (MTH)

The first in a series of teaching arts lunches focused on democratizing the classroom, co-sponsored with the Kahn Institute, Sara Pruss will welcome all back for the spring semester and along with the Sherrerd Center's Teaching Mentors Patty DiBartolo and Caroline Melly, Alex Keller from the Kahn Institute, Magdalena Zapędowska from the Jacobson Center and Candice Price in the Math department will lead a conversation about democratizing the classroom and some of the tensions that exist as faculty move to this space of sharing authority in the classroom with students.

RSVP for Zoom link.


Friday, February 4, 2022 – Building the Foundations for Effective Peer Review
Canceled and rescheduled for fall 2022.


Friday, February 11, 2022 - Teaching Circles (all on Zoom on this date)


Friday, February 18, 2022 - The Covid-19 Pandemic’s Effects on Students
12:20-1:15 pm  

Baishakhi Taylor (Dean of the College) with Kayla Crossley '22, Laura Campuzao, Ada '24, and Jamie Leigh Rambin, '24

Much research and reflections have gone into documenting the effects of the pandemic on current college students. Yet we can only anticipate and speculate how learning and living through a pandemic continues to impact student’s lives even in an endemic state. In this session we will hear from current students about their experience during the pandemic, examine current data on pandemic impact, and discuss ways in which we can support students inside and outside of the classroom.

RSVP.


Friday, February 25, 2022 – Online Nondegree Program Highlights
12:20-1:15 pm *(this week's TAL will be in the Paradise Room at the Conference Center)

Dina Venezky, Executive Director, Non-Degree Programs

Nondegree programs has had to quickly develop and iterate online professional development programs over the past two years. Dina Venezky will share learnings from our Moodle Workplace implementation and other programs that might spur thoughts for your own classes. In addition, we will showcase several of the self-directed programs that help bridge skill gaps for professionals that are available for faculty, staff, and students. 

RSVP.


Friday, March 4, 2022 – Democratizing the Classroom Part II on Ungrading
12:20-1:15 pm

Magdalena Zapędowska (Jacobson Center) and Candice Price (MTH)

The second in a series of teaching arts lunches focused on democratizing the classroom, co-sponsored with the Kahn Institute, Magdalene Zapędowska from the Jacobson Center and Candice Price in the Math department will lead a conversation about ungrading and changing the dynamics of your classroom.

RSVP. 


Friday, March 11, 2022 - Teaching Circles


Friday, March 25, 2022 – Breaking Silos: Helping Students Learn to Collaborate Across the Curricular and Co-Curricular
12:20-1:15 pm
Erin Cohn, Wurtele Center

Faculty and staff work with student teams and seek to support their collaborative work inside and outside of the classroom. While we engage in that work separately, students experience it holistically. What can faculty and staff learn from one another, and what can we all learn from the learning sciences, to help us support students’ growth as collaborators across their curricular and co-curricular experiences?

Join the Wurtele Center for Leadership for this facilitated monthly series of conversations about what it means to work collaboratively in a team at Smith College. Open to all faculty and staff, regardless of title or position.

RSVP.  


Friday, April 1, 2022 – Advising Students in Distress
12:20-1:15 pm

Adela Penagos (Class Dean), Susanna Howe (Class Dean), Michelle Marchese (Director of Counseling Services)

Student distress presents in many different ways and has been exacerbated by the pandemic.  Through teaching and advising, faculty are often early points of contact for students in distress; however, faculty need not be the only support or be equipped to answer all questions.  In this session we will discuss our experiences with how student distress presents specifically on our campus and we will offer suggestions for advising students and helping students find the Smith resources to assist them.  Come with your questions and concerns.

RSVP.


Friday, April 8, 2022 – Lessons learned from our Posse Mentors
12:20-1:15 pm

Marnie Anderson (HST), Denise McKahn (EGR), Kate Queeney (CHM)

Smith offers 10 full scholarships per year, focused on access and success for low-income students, and provides a faculty or staff mentor for each multi-cultural Posse class and a summer enrichment program for the Posse students.

RSVP.


Friday, April 15, 2022 – Democratizing the Classroom Part III: Linguistic Bias in Writing
12:20-1:15 pm

Miranda McCarvel, Jacobson Center

The third in a series of teaching arts lunches focused on democratizing the classroom, co-sponsored with the Kahn Institute, Miranda will discuss linguistic bias in writing, including creating a space in the classroom for students’ native dialects, how to approach the grading of work written by multilingual speakers, how to create a safe space for all dialects in the classroom, and how course and lesson design can accommodate linguistic diversity.

RSVP.


Friday, April 22, 2022 - Teaching Circles

 


Past Teaching Arts Lunches

Below is the list of some past Teaching Arts Lunches. Please contact us if you are interested in receiving more information about past programming.

Fall 2021

Friday, September 17, 2021 –  Teaching and Learning with our Sherrerd Teaching Mentors
12:20-1:15 over Zoom

Sara Pruss, Patty DiBartolo, and Caroline Melly
To kick off the fall, Sara Pruss will welcome all back to campus for Sherrerd events and along with the Sherrerd Center's Teaching Mentors will lead a conversation about aspirations for the upcoming year, and teaching and learning as we move into the Fall.


Friday, September 24, 2021 – Neurodiversity and Space Planning over Zoom
12:30-2:00 pm over Zoom  *Please note extended time

Jeffrey Ashley (Thomas Jefferson University) and Scott Montemerlo (WELL AP & WELL FACULTY, Teknion)
These events (9/24, 11/5 and 12/3) are a collaboration with Dano Weisbord (Associate Vice President for Administration & Campus Planning), the Classroom Committee, and the Sherrerd Center.
Read about Neurodiversity and Space Planning on our website here.


Friday, October 1, 2021 - Teaching Circles


Friday, October 8, 2021 - Conversation about Designing Your Path: IDP 132
12:20-1:15 pm over Zoom

Jess Bacal, Fraser Stables, and Sarah Moore
“It takes a while for our experiences to sift through our consciousness,” writes Natalie Goldberg in Writing Down the Bones (p. 15). The goal of IDP 132: Designing Your Path is to allow time for Smith students to gain perspective through what Goldberg calls “composting,” turning over “the organic details of your life until some of them fall . . . to the solid ground of black soil” (p. 15). Students surface prior knowledge and link it to new knowledge, synthesize learning from different contexts, setting goals, developing theories and making use of mistakes and failures as opportunities for learning. Our group will describe what happens during the class, and invite participants to engage in a version of one of the class exercises. In addition, we will present our theoretical framework, along with three semesters of data collected about the impact of Designing Your Path on Smith students so far.


Friday, October 15, 2021 – Anti-racist Pedagogy
12:20-1:15 over Zoom
Lina Rincón (Sacramento State), Kevin Shea (CHM), Nate Derr (BIO)
“The Anti-Racist Pedagogy Academy” led by Lina Rincón, Director of Faculty Diversity & Inclusion and founder of the Anti-Racist Pedagogy Academy, with Smith College faculty presenters of the Academy, Kevin Shea (Chemistry) and Nate Derr (Biological Sciences). The Academy created a space for faculty to reflect on the historical foundations of racism in the United States, discuss how racism affects the practice as teacher scholars and engage in concrete steps to transform space where students can feel a sense of belong and can thrive. A variety of pedagogical and culturally responsive communication practices that emphasized anti-racist and equity driven topics were explored.


Friday, October 22, 2021 – Sherrerd Award Winners
12:20-1:15 pm over Zoom

Maren Buck (CHM), Gaby Immerman (BIO), Michelle Joffroy (SPN)
This year's Kathleen Compton Sherrerd ’54 and John J. F. Sherrerd Prize recipients for Distinguished Teaching are Maren Buck (CHM), Gaby Immerman (BIO), and Michelle Joffroy (SPN). The award is given annually to Smith faculty members to recognize sustained and distinguished teaching by long-time faculty members as well as to encourage younger faculty members whose demonstrated enthusiasm and excellence influences students and colleagues. This year's winners will discuss their teaching experiences, practices, and philosophies; as well as how they infuse innovation, generosity, empathy and respect into their teaching.


Friday, October 29, 2021 - Teaching Circles


Friday, November 5, 2021 – Panel on Neurodiversity, Inclusive Pedagogy, and Learning Spaces
12:20-1:15 pm in person (with lunch available beginning at noon) in Neilson Browsing Room AND on Zoom

Abby Baines (Head of Public Services, Libraries), Shannon Audley (EDC), Caroline Melly (ANT)
These events (9/24, 11/5 and 12/3) are a collaboration with Dano Weisbord (Associate Vice President for Administration & Campus Planning), the Classroom Committee, and the Sherrerd Center.
Faculty and staff who have thought about neurodiversity in different spaces, both in terms of inclusive teaching and space design will share some thoughts and ideas.


Friday, November 12, 2021 – Pedagogical Partners Panel
12:20-1:15 pm in person (with lunch available beginning at noon) in Neilson Browsing Room

Maren Buck (CHM), Jack Loveless (GEO), Roisin O’Sullivan (ECO), Jon Caris (SAL)
Each will discuss their experience as a pedagogical partner. The Pedagogical Partnership Program engages students as partners to work with faculty in the classroom over an entire semester. Both faculty and staff teachers, as well as student partners are supported by the Sherrerd Center in this flexible model.


Friday, November 19, 2021 – Use of the Jacobson Center and Results of the Self-study
12:20-1:15 pm in person (with lunch available beginning at noon) in Neilson Browsing Room

Sara Eddy (Jacobson Center), Minh Ly (Institutional Research & Educational Assessment)
The year-long self-study that the Jacobson Center conducted last year with Minh Ly's help will be presented, including surveys of faculty, students, and administration. The data from this study prompted some major changes to the organization of the writing center starting this year and planned for rollout over the next three consecutive years.


Friday, December 3, 2021 – Updates and Discussion about the Young Science Center Classroom from the Design Team
12:20-1:15 pm in person (with lunch available beginning at noon) in Neilson Browsing Room

Dano Weisbord (Associate VP of Sustainability and Campus Planning), Michael Tyre, AIA, LEED AP (Principal/Design Director), Jenna McClure, AIA LEED AP (Associate Principal)
The third in a series of teaching arts lunches focused on supporting a neuro-diverse community in the classroom. This TAL will feature a presentation by architects from the firm Amenta/Emma, sharing designs for a new flat-floor classroom in the basement of the former Young Library. These designs will specifically consider the needs of neuro-diverse learners as well as a wide range of pedagogical approaches. 


Friday, December 10, 2021 - Teaching Circles
Please note: Location change for some circles (now in CC 103/4 for December).


Spring 2021

Come gather with the Sherrerd Center director, advisory board, colleagues, and guests as we talk about teaching, the work of the Sherrerd Center, and mostly, to gather informally to support one another in our teaching adventures at Smith. All are welcome to these Zoom gatherings.


Friday, February 19, 2021 - Sherrerd Mentors on Equity and Inclusion in the classroom and Disabilities in teaching and learning at Smith
12:30-1:30 pm

Liz Pryor and Caroline Melly


Friday, February 26, 2021 - Workshop with Dr. Mays Imad on Trauma-Informed Pedagogy: Ours is Not a Caravan of Despair: Trauma-Informed Teaching for Restorative Justice co-sponsored by the Office for Equity and Inclusion
12:30-1:30 pm
Dr. Mays Imad
In this session we will consider the neuroscience of toxic stress and its impact on learning. We will examine the principles and practical examples of trauma-informed approaches, whether it's in the classroom or at the institution. Finally we will reflect on the connections between trauma-informed teaching and restorative justice. 

Mays Imad is a neuroscientist and professor of pathophysiology and biomedical ethics at Pima Community College, the founding coordinator of the Teaching and Learning Center, and a Gardner Institute Fellow. Dr. Imad’s current research focuses on stress, self-awareness, advocacy, and classroom community, and how these relate to cognition, metacognition, and, ultimately, student learning and success.


Friday, March 5, 2021 - Teaching Circles
12:30-1:30 pm


Friday, March 12, 2021 - Writing Enriched Curriculum
12:30-1:30 pm

Sara Eddy (Jacobson Center), Erin Pineda and Alice Hearst (GOV), Katie Kinnaird (SDS), Julianna Tymoczko (MTH), Benita Jackson (PSY)
Please join us for a conversation about the Writing Enriched Curriculum (WEC) initiative, now in its second year at Smith.  Launched in 2007 at the University of Minnesota, the WEC model is a faculty-driven, innovative approach to rethinking how writing is taught in the disciplines.  It provides academic departments with a means to ensure that discipline-relevant writing and writing instruction are intentionally infused into their curricula.  


Friday, March 19, 2021 - Teaching Circles
12:30-1:30 pm


Friday, March 26, 2021 - Conversation about Humanities Labs
*2:30-3:30 pm    *Note the different time
Lisa Armstrong (SWG), Josh Birk (HST), and Carrie Baker (SWG)
The Sherrerd Center, the Kahn Institute, and the Jandon Center are pleased to announce a co-sponsored conversation with panelists Lisa Armstrong (SWG), Carrie Baker (SWG), and Josh Birk (HST) on involving students in Humanities Labs. Presenters will share experiences supervising students in Humanities Labs on Friday March 26th 2:30 to 3:30, before the April 9th deadline for the call for proposals. All are invited to attend and learn from our panelists.


Friday, April 2, 2021 - New Possibilities in the Neilson Library
12:30-1:30 pm

Susan Fliss (Libraries), Samantha Earp (ITS), Jean Ferguson (Libraries + ITS), Beth Myers (Libraries) and Rob O’Connell (Libraries)
After over eight years of planning, the new Neilson Library opened on Monday, March 29*. Presenters will describe the new services and service points available to faculty and students and hear your input. *Neilson is currently accessible only by members of the Smith community in the Covid screening program.


Friday, April 9, 2021 - Calderwood Seminars
12:30-1:30 pm

Rick Millington (moderator) with panelists: Anna Botta, Tom Roberts, Julianna Tymoczko, Camille Washington-Ottombre, and MJ Wraga 
The Calderwood Seminars in Public Writing offer our students a new kind of capstone experience:  they consolidate their knowledge in the major by bringing their intellectual commitments and passions to a broad public audience through an array of public facing writing assignments: op-eds, reviews, journalistic accounts of key issues in the liberal arts disciplines.  But what is it like to teach one?  Join a panel of colleagues for a first-hand account of this distinctive, writing-focused pedagogical model.  


Friday, April 16, 2021 - Teaching Circles
12:30-1:30 pm


Friday, April 23, 2021 - How Privilege Manifests in Class Participation
12:30-1:30 pm
Jennifer Guglielmo, Jen Malkowski, and Will Williams


Friday, April 30, 2021 - Looking at Group Work with a Lens to Equity and Inclusion
12:30-1:30 pm
Valerie Joseph and Kevin Shea
Join panelists Kris Dorsey (Engineering), Caroline Melly (Anthropology), and Nate Derr (Biology) for a discussion about designing intentional group work that addresses issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion. They will share strategies from their classes in hopes of motivating others to think about these issues when incorporating group work into classes.


Friday, May 7, 2021 - Teaching Circles
12:30-1:30 pm


Fall 2020

Friday, September 11, 2020—Teaching Circles

  • Talking Through Remote Teaching: The Ups and Downs of the Fall 2020 with Liz Pryor (History); 12:30-1:30 pm
  • Interdependence in the (Remote) Classroom: Creating Community, Accountability, Flexibility with Caroline Melly (Anthropology); 12:30-1:20 pm

Friday, September 18, 2020—Teaching students and not content: The social context of pedagogy
12:30–1:30 p.m.

Bryan Dewsbury, University of Rhode Island


Friday, September 25, 2020—Teaching Circles

  • First Year Seminar Faculty Teaching Circle with Alice Hearst (GOV); 12:30-1:30 pm

Friday, October 2, 2020—Teaching Circles

  • Contingent Faculty Circle with Bona Kang (EDC) and Caitlin Shepherd (PSY); 12:20-1:20 pm
  • Laboratory Instructors Circle with Marney Pratt (BIO); 12:30-1:30 pm

Friday, October 16, 2020—Embodying your Curriculum: A Workshop on Trauma-Informed Pedagogy
1–4 p.m.

Anita Chari (Associate Prof. of Political Science, University of Oregon) and Angelica Singh (M.A., BCST, Founder of The Embodiment Process™), co-founders of Embodying Your Curriculum, an online program designed to resource professors, students, and administrators with trauma-informed tools.

This 3-hour workshop introduces participants to practices for the classroom based on trauma-informed pedagogies, the neuroscience of mental health, and pedagogies of social justice and diversity. The workshop will support faculty to create connection and embodied presence in the online and in-person classroom at a moment when higher education is called upon to face profound social problems that cannot be walled off from our classes and that produce anxiety, stress, and burnout among students, staff, and faculty. The workshop will address trauma and overwhelm within the specific context of the pandemic and the movements against anti-Black violence, with practices that you can begin to use in your classroom and in your life immediately.


Friday, October 23, 2020—Teaching Circles

  • Talking Through Remote Teaching: Creating Community, Accountability, Flexibility with Caroline Melly (Anthropology) and Liz Pryor (History); 12:30-1:20 pm
  • Contingent Faculty Circle with Bona Kang (EDC) and Caitlin Shepherd (PSY); 12:20-1:20 pm

******Difficult Political Conversations Roundtable, Part I, sponsored by the Sherrerd Center
Friday, October 23, 6-8pm ET
The 2020 election brings with it feelings of uncertainty, anxiety, and conflict. This roundtable dialogue serves as a space to honor these feelings and give some tools to those in the Smith community who find themselves navigating difficult conversations leading up to this year’s election. Sponsored by the Sherrerd Center and moderated by Nimisha Bhat (Libraries), panelists Valerie Joseph (Anthropologist and AEMES Mentoring Administrative Director), Loretta Ross (Visiting Associate Professor, Study of Women & Gender), Peggy O’Neill (Assistant Professor, School for Social Work), Kris Evans (Associate Director, Counseling Services), and Greg White (Professor, Government) will bring their experiences and perspectives to the roundtable addressing ways to have difficult conversations, “calling in” peers instead of “calling out,” and leading with empathy while honoring other complex feelings. 


Friday, October 30, 2020—Discussing the Election with Government Faculty
12:30–1:30 p.m.
Anna Mwaba and Howard Gold


Friday, November 6, 2020—Teaching Circles

  • Talking Through Remote Teaching: Creating Community, Accountability, Flexibility with Caroline Melly (Anthropology) and Liz Pryor (History); 12:30-1:20 pm

Friday, November 13, 2020—Teaching Circles

  • Contingent Faculty Circle with Bona Kang (EDC) and Caitlin Shepherd (PSY); 12:20-1:20 pm

Friday, November 20, 2020—Inclusive Teaching Workshop
12:30-2 p.m.

Viji Sathy and Kelly Hogan, award winning instructors with a combined 25+ years in the classroom at the University of North Carolina will share expertise on inclusive techniques and active learning in any size crowd (both teach courses routinely with hundreds of students).
 

******Difficult Political Conversations Roundtable, Part II, sponsored by the Sherrerd Center
Friday, November 20, 6-8pm ET
In this second session of the series, panelists will discuss how and when we choose to engage in difficult political conversations in the aftermath of the 2020 election. Sponsored by the Sherrerd Center and moderated by Nimisha Bhat (Libraries), panelists Valerie Joseph (Anthropologist and AEMES Mentoring Administrative Director), Loretta Ross (Visiting Associate Professor, Study of Women & Gender), Peggy O’Neill (Assistant Professor, School for Social Work), Kris Evans (Associate Director, Counseling Services), and Greg White (Professor, Government) will bring their experiences and perspectives to the roundtable to talk about how to create an environment for radical listening, facilitating conversations empathetically, and the work we all want to do moving forward.

The recording for Difficult Political Conversations Roundtable Part 1 that took place on October 23, 2020, is here.


Friday, December 4, 2020—Teaching Circles

  • Talking Through J-term Teaching with Sara Pruss, Caroline Melly (Anthropology), and Liz Pryor (History); 12:30-1:20 pm

Friday, December 11, 2020—Active Learning Online: 5 Principles
12:30-1:30 p.m.
Dr. Steve Kosslyn (former professor of cognitive science at Harvard, former head of the Stanford Center for Advanced Study, former chief academic officer from Minerva and expert on the science of learning) will present on his current book releasing soon entitled Active Learning Online: 5 Principles That Make Online Courses Come Alive.

What Kathy McCartney says about his book: This small book contains big ideas about active learning, both online and in-person. Kosslyn bridges his knowledge of cognitive science with his experience in two education technology start-ups to provide a pedagogical handbook of sorts. Using engaging research studies, Kosslyn begins with an overview of basic cognitive functions, specifically how we organize, store and access information in memory. From here, he presents his own taxonomy of five learning principles: deep processing, chunking, associations, dual coding and deliberate practice. Then comes the lesson for instructors, as we come to appreciate exercises grounded in these principles. After reading this book, you will abandon the lecture for a brief lecture followed by active learning exercises, for example asking students to teach another student, to take the perspective or others through role playing or debate, to create content like a podcast and more. If your goal is to teach to make material stick with your students, and it should be, this book will be your guide.    

Teaching Circles

  • Contingent Faculty Circle with Bona Kang (EDC) and Caitlin Shepherd (PSY); 12:20-1:20 pm