Skip Navigation

Inclusion, Diversity & Equity

Contact

Inclusion, Diversity & Equity

College Hall 302
Northampton, MA 01063

Phone: 413-585-2141
Fax: 413-585-3026

Dwight Hamilton holds open hours on Fridays, 1:30–4:30 p.m., or by appointment

Multicultural Affairs

Clark Hall
Northampton, MA 01063

Phone: 413-585-4940

L'Tanya Richmond holds open hours on Wednesdays and Thursdays, 1:30–2:30 p.m. 

The Office of Inclusion, Diversity and Equity supports the college’s belief that diversity in all aspects of the educational environment is necessary for achieving the highest level of academic excellence. Members of an educational community rich in varying perspectives, outlooks and values will be better prepared to deal with complexity and to participate productively in a pluralistic society.

Two students in the Campus Center


Staff

Dwight Hamilton

Vice President for Inclusion, Diversity and Equity
​​College Hall 302​
​413-585-2141

L’Tanya Richmond

Director of Multicultural Affairs
Clark Hall
413-585-4940

Sarah Harebo

Title IX Coordinator and Institutional Equity Officer
​​College Hall 302​
​413-585-2245

Mariana Estrella Rivera AC ’16

Administrative Assistant
College Hall 302
​413-585-2141


Dwight K. Hamilton

Dwight K. Hamilton, vice president for inclusion, diversity and equity, is charged with guiding the development of all diversity and equity-related initiatives and programs at the college as well as contributing to the recruitment and retention of diverse faculty, students and staff. Hamilton oversees the creation and revision of policies regarding gender-based and sexual misconduct, religious accommodation, sexual assault response, transgender inclusiveness, and procedures that result in increased hiring of women and underrepresented racial groups. Open hours are Fridays from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m., or by appointment.

L’Tanya Richmond

L’Tanya Richmond, the director of multicultural affairs, coordinates a range of activities that explore one's identity, culture and heritage as well as those of others. She is available to meet regularly and individually with students to support their retention and overall well-being. While communicating by email is great, it's no substitute for talking face-to-face. Mrs. Richmond is available on a walk-in basis and daily by appointment. She also holds open hours on Wednesdays and Thursdays from 1:30 to 2:30 pm.

Sarah Harebo

Sarah Harebo is Smith’s Title IX coordinator and institutional equity officer. She brings a wealth of experience as a trainer, advocate and policy expert to her job overseeing compliance with the federal law banning sex discrimination in higher education. Harebo holds a law degree from Pennsylvania State University’s Dickinson School of Law and served as staff attorney for the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence before coming to Smith.


Community Standards

Smith College fosters free access to knowledge, its unfettered discovery and communication through research and education, and the creation and sustenance of a community of scholars, students and staff. The Smith community can realize these goals only in an atmosphere of trust and respect. The college aspires to create and maintain an educational, working and living environment that is respectful of differences and free from harassing behavior.

To foster trust and respect in a diverse community, Smith College encourages community members to behave in ways that affirm respect for each other. Within an academic institution, teaching, research and learning are subject to the protections described in the college's policy on academic freedom. Actions or words used in the context of the academic curriculum and teaching environments that serve legitimate and reasonable educational purposes will not be evaluated as violating policies that bar certain behaviors, sexual harassment or unlawful discrimination.

In a diverse community, disagreements and conflicts, with varying degrees of seriousness, are inevitable. The college strongly encourages informal resolution of disputes and conflicts. Many issues are best resolved by direct communication between the individuals involved, sometimes with the help of a third party. Community members are expected to engage in good faith attempts to mediate their differences. To that end, all members of the Smith community are encouraged to use the deans, academic department chairs, supervisors and the staff members listed on this site to discuss concerns and seek resolution to differences.

Three students in a dining room


Letters to the Community

A Message to New Students

Congratulations on your acceptance to Smith College. Few things in your life will have such a marked influence as your college experience, and Smith is an outstanding institution at which to complete your education.

At Smith, we will challenge you to stretch beyond your present capacities and become an active partner in your education. You will be encouraged to question, think, write, plan, discuss and present. You will also be given opportunities to develop your leadership potential, to explore the world beyond the classroom and the campus through study abroad, and to prepare for your career and your future responsibilities through internships and service. Your personal and academic growth are at the center of this institution.

Committed to maintaining a diverse community in an atmosphere of mutual respect, Smith provides an opportunity for women to live and study among other races and cultures. To be successful in a diverse environment, students can expect support from several administrative and academic departments, including the Office of Multicultural Affairs (OMA), where our mission is to provide a critical support structure that will enrich the overall experience of students of color at Smith. The key to your success is to take advantage of all that Smith has to offer. Given the variety of activities on campus, you are certain to find one or more that you will enjoy. I challenge you to get involved from the start to ensure that your academic year begins on a positive note.

Your undergraduate experience at Smith College can be just the beginning of the most exciting, challenging and rewarding time of your life. To learn more, contact me at 413-585-4940 any time you have questions.

Sincerely,

L'Tanya Richmond
Director of Multicultural Affairs

A Message to Parents & Families

I am delighted that your daughter will be attending Smith College. In acknowledgement of the ongoing guidance you will be offering her, I am happy to acquaint you with some of the numerous academic and cultural programs available at Smith.

Smith College, a recognized leader in liberal arts education for women, is a vibrant community populated with intriguing people from a variety of cultures and socio-economic backgrounds. Smith has made an ongoing commitment to cultural diversity, offering students innumerable opportunities to meet a new community of scholars and friends. At Smith, your daughter will encounter new people with whom to share ideas in many ways.

Smith is truly a wonderful place. Yet, as on most predominantly white campuses, students from diverse backgrounds face challenges. The college is steadfast in its efforts to maintain a community that embraces diversity. It continually sponsors educational and social events with this goal in mind. Beginning with its orientation programs, notably the Bridge program, students of color are afforded numerous opportunities to become an integral part of the Smith community. Once enrolled at Smith, most students of color find a niche in both Unity House and Mwangi Cultural Center, which serve as forums for discussing ideas about diversity and multiculturalism. They are also the venues for many multicultural events throughout the year, ranging from "A Celebration of Unity" to Big Sibling/Little Sibling teas.

By choosing Smith, your daughter will receive an excellent liberal arts education on a campus that values academic excellence and diversity. As such, the Office of Multicultural Affairs offers a holistic support to students of color: monitoring their progress, advising student organizations, promoting positive community relations and representing their concerns. I look forward to meeting and getting to know your daughter, and I invite you to contact me if I can be of assistance. Your comments and feedback are welcome.

Sincerely,

L'Tanya Richmond
Director of Multicultural Affairs

Inclusion, Diversity & Equity Update

April 27, 2016

Creating an inclusive campus requires sustained attention and intentional action from the Smith community — students, staff and faculty. At the beginning of this semester, President McCartney and I wrote to the Smith community about actions that we would undertake to invest in inclusion at Smith. As we close the academic year, I am writing to document our progress on these commitments and next steps.

Supporting students of color: The Office of Multicultural Affairs is closing in on the selection of an assistant director and anticipates filling this new position in early summer. Through this position, we will provide increased support to our Unity organizations and present additional inclusive programming in collaboration with others in our community.

Holding listening sessions: In partnership with the Student Government Association and House Presidents Association, President McCartney and I began hosting listening sessions for students, facilitated by Director of Multicultural Affairs L’Tanya Richmond. Students discussed barriers to inclusion at Smith and shared their ideas about how to break these barriers down. Going forward, we will continue to solicit student input by holding more listening sessions and by partnering with groups like the Chief Diversity Officer’s Student Advisory Board.

Diversifying the college: The class of 2019 is the most diverse in Smith’s history. We have had an increase of more than 17 percent in applications for admission to Smith during the last two years. Admissions anticipates that the incoming class of 2020 will also be notably diverse. With respect to staff, we are applying best practices to address implicit bias in staff hiring. And with respect to faculty hiring, department chairs and directors are similarly committed to best practices that ensure diverse applicant pools. As a result, our faculty searches continue to recruit exceptional scholar-teachers from richly diverse backgrounds — each of whom brings a track record of promoting success for students who are underrepresented in their disciplines.

Advancing inclusion: Our faculty recently devoted time during two faculty meetings to discussing ways to make our classrooms more inclusive. Next year, the Sherrerd Center for Teaching and Learning will focus its programming on creating inclusive classrooms. The Office of Inclusion, Diversity and Equity has also conducted training on creating inclusive workplaces for various administrative departments; our goal is to reach all departments within the next academic year.

Campus climate survey: Earlier this term, we held focus groups to surface issues that will ensure that our Pathways Campus Climate Survey, to be launched next fall, reflects the experiences of our community. Through Pathways, we will seek the voices of all members of the Smith community and use those findings to take tangible actions to improve the college.

Addressing mental health and wellness: In partnership with Dean of Students Julie Ohotnicky, I have assembled a task force to examine our mental health resources and provide recommendations on improving them. The task force includes representatives from the Counseling Center, institutional research, wellness education and the psychology faculty. We will be consulting with the SGA’s Committee on Health and Mental Health Services to ensure students’ experiences are reflected in our recommendations. We expect to complete our assessment in the fall.

Hosting thought leaders: Through the Presidential Colloquium series, visiting speakers such as Imani Perry, danah boyd, and Lawrence Lessig have brought their unique perspectives on what it means to have an inclusive society. Further, the Science Center Committee on Diversity hosted Evelynn Hammonds, who engaged the Smith community in a discussion titled “Being Color Brave Not Color Blind: Creating an Inclusive Academy.” Students have also shown leadership by inviting and hosting powerful speakers like Cornel West and Viola Davis. At the request of the Black Student Alliance, President McCartney has invited the historian and literary critic Henry Louis Gates, Jr., to deliver a Presidential Colloquium next academic year.

Honoring our pioneers: On May 6, 2016, in the company of our board of trustees, we will honor our pioneering alumnae Salome Amelia Machado (class of 1883), Angel DeCora (class of 1896), Otelia Cromwell (class of 1900), Tei Ninomiya (class of 1910) and Sabiha Yassin Hashimy (class of 1937) who opened doors at Smith for students of color and international students, by naming our apartments in the new Friedman Complex after them. Acknowledging their important place in Smith’s history affirms the kind of community we aspire to be today and in the future.

As President McCartney wrote in her column in the Spring 2016Smith Alumnae Quarterly, “This generation [of students] is raising real and important issues about inequities on our campuses and in society at large.” She and I realize that we need more than a statement of values about the importance of inclusion — we need sustained attention. Despite the advances outlined in this letter, much work remains, on our campus and beyond. I am fortunate to have so many allies, partners, and colleagues who believe in Smith and have contributed their time and expertise to our efforts to create a more inclusive and equitable community. Going forward, President McCartney and I will continue to make this work a priority. We hope we can count on your partnership.

Sincerely,

Dwight K Hamilton
Vice President for Inclusion, Diversity and Equity
dhamilton@smith.edu

Material Distributed to Campus Printers

March 24, 2016

I am writing to inform you that we are currently working to address a racist and anti-Semitic flyer transmitted to several networked printers and fax machines at Smith. This incident appears to have occurred at several institutions within the Five College community. We have determined that this document was sent from an off-campus computer; Campus Police and ITS are working to identify and block its source.

This document and its contents have no place in our community. We reject its hateful message as well as its intention to shock and intimidate. Our work to create an inclusive Smith community, where each member is safe, valued, and respected, will not be derailed by this cowardly act nor the hateful mindset that drove it. We are not intimidated; we are emboldened in our resolve.

If you receive one of these documents, please notify ITS at4its@smith.edu or Campus Police at 413-585-2490. Please include the name of your office, the type of device through which it was received, the sender’s IP address (if known), and the telephone number of a contact person.

Sincerely,

Dwight K. Hamilton
Vice President for Inclusion, Diversity and Equity

Town Hall Event

November 13, 2015

Dear Students,

I was proud, though not surprised, that you stood in solidarity with your peers at the University of Missouri, Yale University and Ithaca College. In the short time that I have been at Smith, I have admired your strong sense of activism.

I have been briefing President McCartney, who is in the middle of a two-week Asia trip for Smith. On Thursday night, speaking to alumnae in Hong Kong, she shared that Smith students had gathered in solidarity to oppose racial discrimination at our nation’s campuses. She said she was proud that ours is an activist campus, dedicated to improving inclusion, diversity and equity at Smith and beyond.

Although higher education has opened its doors ever wider to students from all backgrounds, the work remains to ensure that colleges and universities are creating an environment where all students are respected, valued, and treated equitably. You are responding to more than Halloween costumes or fraternity parties; you are addressing systemic injustice, and because of that, I feel optimism. The work you are doing builds on a legacy of campuses addressing social justice—protests that ultimately ended the Vietnam War and led to the downfall of apartheid. I reject the narrative that recent events at college campuses are the sign of a lack of student resilience. I have had the privilege of meeting many Smith students who have faced tremendous adversity to attain their dream of a college education.

Please be aware that the Office of Inclusion, Diversity and Equity is a resource to all members of our community who experience acts of intolerance. Although we’ve begun the process of surfacing the experiences of all members of our community through our Campus Climate Survey initiative, we are not standing by idly until we complete that task. We are currently actively focusing on improving diversity in our faculty and staff; making classrooms more inclusive for students; and working to prevent, address and eliminate all forms of gender-based and sexual misconduct. In all of our endeavors, we actively partner with students and incorporate their voices into our practices.

President McCartney returns to campus on Monday, November 23. She and I would welcome the opportunity to meet with students, faculty and staff for an open conversation about racism on college campuses. We will hold a town hall event at the Campus Center Carroll Room at 4:30 p.m. Monday, November 23. We hope to see you there. We look forward to gathering with you to talk about our shared commitment to a just and equitable campus community. In the meantime, we want to assure you of one thing you can rely on: the senior team at Smith College will always be there to listen to student concerns—always.

Sincerely,

Dwight K Hamilton, J.D
Chief Diversity Officer
Office of Inclusion, Diversity and Equity