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Gabrielle Starr

G. Gabrielle Starr

On Value: Arts, Education, Aesthetics and Policy

Monday, April 8, 2019
5 p.m., Campus Center Carroll Room

Pomona College President G. Gabrielle Starr is a highly regarded scholar of English literature whose work reaches into neuroscience and the arts. Recipient of the Guggenheim Fellowship, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation’s New Directions Fellowship and a National Science Foundation ADVANCE grant, Starr offers a compelling voice for working across academic disciplines to spark intellectual discovery. Her research looks closely at the brain, through the use of fMRI, to help get to the heart of how people respond to paintings, music and other forms of art. Her most recent book, Feeling Beauty: The Neuroscience of Aesthetic Experience, was a finalist for the Phi Beta Kappa Society’s 2014 Christian Gauss Award.

Martha Nussbaum

Martha Nussbaum

Anger, Fear and the Politics of Blame

Friday, March 29, 2019
4:30 p.m., Campus Center Carroll Room

Martha Nussbaum is the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago, where she is jointly appointed in the law school and the philosophy department. She has a particular interest in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy, political philosophy, feminism and ethics, including animal rights. She also holds associate appointments in classics, divinity, and political science. Nussbaum is the author of a number of books, including The Fragility of Goodness, Sex and Social Justice and Frontiers of Justice: Disability, Nationality, Species Membership. She received the 2016 Kyoto Prize in Arts and Philosophy and the 2018 Berggruen Prize for Philosophy and Culture.

Ijeoma Oluo photo

Ijeoma Oluo

The Only Way Out Is Through: Solidarity and Accountability

Tuesday, November 13, 2018
5 p.m., Leo Weinstein Auditorium

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Ijeoma Oluo is a Seattle-based writer, speaker and self-described “Internet Yeller.” She is the author of the New York Times bestseller So You Want to Talk About Race. Named one of the The Root’s 100 Most Influential African Americans in 2017 and winner of the of the 2018 Feminist Humanist Award by the American Humanist Society, Oluo’s work focuses primarily on issues of race and identity, feminism, social and mental health, social justice, the arts and personal essay. Her writing has been featured in The Washington Post, NBC News, Elle magazine, Time, The Stranger and The Guardian, among other outlets. 

Freeman Hrabowski

Freeman Hrabowski

Promoting Access and Diversity in STEM Fields

Monday, October 29, 2018
4:30 p.m., Campus Center Carroll Room

Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, has served as president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, since 1992. Named one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World by Time (2012) and one of America’s Best Leaders by U.S. News & World Report (2008), his research and publications focus on science and math education, with special emphasis on minority participation and performance. He chaired the National Academies’ committee that produced the 2011 report, Expanding Underrepresented Minority Participation: America’s Science and Technology Talent at the Crossroads. He was named in 2012 by President Obama to chair the President’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans.

 

Pam Bosley and Stasha Rhodes

America’s Gun Violence Epidemic

Monday, October 22, 2018
4:30 p.m., Campus Center Carroll Room

After one of Pam Bosley’s sons was murdered on the grounds of a church, she left a career in banking to make a difference in the lives of youth. She now serves as the violence prevention manager for the ARK of St. Sabina in Chicago, where she empowers young people to be leaders and self-advocates, guiding them to discover their own voices and abilities to bring change to their communities. She is also the co-founder of Purpose Over Pain, an organization that offers support to parents who have lost children to violence, advocates for common sense gun measures, and provides a safe space and mentorship for youth.

Stasha Rhodes is the director of engagement for Giffords, an organization formed by the merger of Americans for Responsible Solutions and the Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence and a leader in the growing movement to save lives from gun violence. She previously served as the founder and principal of The Red Team, LLC, an advocacy firm specializing in issue campaign management, grassroots organizing, and government relations, as the director of advocacy for guns and crime policy at the Center for American Progress, and as the American Heart Association’s Louisiana director of government affairs.

Nancy Malkiel

Nancy Malkiel ’65, LTD ’97

“Keep the Damned Women Out”:  The Struggle for Coeducation

Wednesday, September 26, 2018
4 p.m., Campus Center Carroll Room

Nancy Weiss Malkiel is professor of history, emeritus, at Princeton University. A scholar of 20th-century American history, she is the author of “Keep the Damned Women Out”: The Struggle for Coeducation, a study of the cascade of decisions for coeducation at elite institutions of higher education between 1969 and 1974. During her tenure at Princeton, she served as dean of the college—the longest-serving dean in Princeton’s history, at 24 years—and was founding master of Dean Mathey College, one of Princeton’s six residential colleges. A graduate and former trustee of Smith and a trustee of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, she received her M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard University.

Martha Minow

Martha Minow

Constitution Day Lecture: Freedom of the Press and the Changing Ecosystem of News

Monday, September 17, 2018
4:30 p.m., Campus Center Carroll Room

Martha Minow is the 300th Anniversary University Professor at Harvard Law School, where her courses include civil procedure, constitutional law, family law, international criminal justice, jurisprudence, law and education, nonprofit organizations, and the public law workshop. She is also a lecturer in the Harvard Graduate School of Education and Distinguished Service Professor at Harvard University. An expert in human rights and advocacy for members of racial and religious minorities and for women, children and persons with disabilities, she also writes and teaches about privatization, military justice, and ethnic and religious conflict.

Juana María Rodríguez

Imagining Respect, Refusing Respectability

Friday, April 13, 2018
4:30 p.m., Leo Weinstein Auditorium

Juana María Rodríguez is a leading scholar and cultural commentator whose research focuses on race and sexual politics, Latino/a/x and Caribbean literatures and cultures, queer activism and transgender studies. She is the author of two books: Queer Latinidad: Identity Practices, Discursive Spaces introduced the idea of queer latinidad, and Sexual Futures, Queer Gestures, and Other Latina Longings earned the Alan Bray Memorial Prize from the Modern Language Association. Rodríguez is professor of comparative ethnic studies at UC Berkeley, and is a proud recipient of the university’s Distinguished Teaching Award. The recipient of a Ph.D. degree from UC Berkeley, she earned a B.A. from San Francisco State University and an M.A. in English from Columbia.

Jack P. Shonkoff, M.D.

Leveraging 21st-Century Science to Advance Social Justice

Thursday, February 15, 2018
5 p.m., Leo Weinstein Auditorium

Jack P. Shonkoff, M.D., is founding director of Harvard’s Center on the Developing Child, whose mission is to bring credible science to bear on public policy affecting young children. He also chairs the JPB Research Network on Toxic Stress, which is developing new ways to assess the biological, bio-behavioral and health consequences of excessive stress. In 2011, he launched Frontiers of Innovation to support the lifelong health of young children and families experiencing significant adversity. Shonkoff is a chaired professor at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health and at the Graduate School of Education; he also is professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital.

Ruby Bridges

Friday, February 2, 2018
4 p.m., John M. Greene Hall

In 1960, Ruby Bridges became a symbol of the civil rights movement as the youngest of a group of African American students to integrate schools in the American South. Her bravery inspired the Norman Rockwell painting The Problem We All Live With (1964), which depicts the young Bridges walking to school between two sets of federal marshals, a racial epithet marking the wall behind them. Her memoir, Through My Eyes, was released in 1999. “Racism is a grown-up disease,” Bridges has said, “and we must stop using our children to spread it.” She was awarded the Presidential Citizens Medal in 2001.

Maura Healey

Our Role in Upholding the Constitutıon

Monday, September 18, 2017, 4:30 p.m.
Leo Weinstein Auditorium, Wright Hall

Maura Healey is an attorney, a former professional basketball player (she’s 5’4”) and, since 2015, the Attorney General for Massachusetts. As the “people’s lawyer” for the commonwealth, Healey leads an office dedicated, in her words, to “protecting consumers, ensuring equality for all and keeping our communities safer.” Since taking office, Healey has tackled issues including the heroin and prescription drug abuse epidemic, escalating health care costs, workers' rights and student loan costs. She has focused on strengthening consumer protections and on improving our criminal justice system. A Harvard graduate with a J.D. degree from Northeastern, Healey is the first openly gay attorney general in the United States.

Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

Black America Since MLK

Monday, March 27, 2017, 4:30 p.m.
Weinstein Auditorium, Wright Hall

Henry Louis Gates, Jr., is the Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and Director of the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University. Emmy Award-winning filmmaker, literary scholar, journalist, cultural critic and institution builder, Gates has authored or co-authored more than 20 books and created more than a dozen documentary films, including Wonders of the African World, African American Lives, Faces of America, Black in Latin America and Finding Your Roots, his groundbreaking genealogy series for PBS. A member of the first class awarded “genius grants” by the MacArthur Foundation in 1981, in 1998 he became the first African American scholar to be awarded the National Humanities Medal.

Robert Kegan

Robert Kegan

Tuesday, February 28, 2017, 4:30 p.m.
Weinstein Auditorium

Robert Kegan is a psychologist who teaches, researches, writes and consults about adult development, adult learning and professional development. His work explores the possibility and necessity of ongoing psychological transformation in adulthood; the fit between adult capacities and the hidden demands of modern life; and the evolution of consciousness in adulthood and its implications for supporting adult learning, professional development, and adult education. A licensed clinical psychologist and practicing therapist, Kegan lectures widely and consults in the area of professional development.

Rachel Maddow

Reflections on the 2016 Election

Rachel Maddow

Monday, January 23, 2017, 10 a.m.
John M. Greene Hall

Rachel Maddow is a political commentator who rose to national prominence after launching her career on local radio. On her nightly television program, MSNBC’s “The Rachel Maddow Show,” Maddow daily analyzes top headlines from the worlds of politics, current events, sports, science, health, crime and the absurd. Her interviews with newsmakers have been described as spotlighting “the headlines, and the politics behind the headlines.” Maddow was the speaker at Smith’s 2010 commencement ceremony.

Ana Navarro

Ana Navarro

Tuesday, January 24, 2017, 5:30 p.m.
John M. Greene Hall

Strategist and commentator Ana Navarro is one of the leading Hispanic Republican political voices in the United States. A political commentator on CNN, ABC and Telemundo, she frequently comments on political issues and current affairs in national and international print media. A native of Nicaragua and a graduate of the University of Miami, she has served as ambassador to the United Nations Human Right Commission and was a fellow at Harvard’s Institute of Politics. She was a member of Florida Gov. Jeb Bush’s transition team and administration in 1998–99, and was the national Hispanic co-chair for the presidential campaigns of John McCain in 2008 and Gov. Jon Huntsman in 2012.

Presidential Colloquium Speaker Mahzarin Banaji

Mahzarin Banaji

Workshop on implicit Bias

Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People

Friday, October 28, 2016, 2 p.m.
Sweeney Concert Hall, Sage Hall

Mahzarin Banaji is the Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics at Harvard University. With social psychologists Anthony Greenwald and Brian Nosek, she maintains an educational website, Project Implicit, designed to create awareness about unconscious bias. In 2016 the Association for Psychological Science named Banaji one of its William James Fellows, an award given to outstanding contributors to scientific psychology.

Presidential Colloquium Speaker Arne Duncan

Arne Duncan

Jane Grossman Cecil '50 Memorial Lecture

What I’ve Learned From Children

Wednesday, September 21, 2016, 5 p.m.
Weinstein Auditorium, Wright Hall

Arne Duncan was appointed U.S. Secretary of Education by President Barack Obama in 2009 and served in that position until early 2016. He previously served as superintendent of the Chicago Public Schools. He is a managing partner at the Palo Alto–based education group Emerson Collective.

Presidential Colloquium Speaker Patti Saris

The Honorable Patti B. Saris

Constitution Day Lecture

Mass Incarceration and Criminal Justice Reform

Thursday, September 15, 2016, 4:30 p.m.
Neilson Browsing Room

Patti B. Saris has served as a United States district judge for the District of Massachusetts since 1994 and as chief judge of the district court since 2013. She has been a member and chair of the United States Sentencing Commission since 2010. For Smith’s annual Constitution Day lecture, Judge Saris will speak about the problem of overincarceration in the United States as well as her work on the Sentencing Commission.

Lawrence Lessig

Lawrence Lessig

Wednesday, April 20, 2016, 5 p.m.
Weinstein Auditorium, Wright Hall

Lawrence Lessig is the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and Director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University. Prior to rejoining the Harvard faculty, Lessig was a professor at Stanford Law School, where he founded the school’s Center for Internet and Society, and at the University of Chicago. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Association. His awards include the Free Software Foundation’s Freedom Award, Fastcase 50 Award and being named one of Scientific American’s Top 50 Visionaries.

Maria Klawe

Maria Klawe

Getting More Women Into Tech Careers

Tuesday, April 12, 2016, 5 p.m.
Alumnae House Conference Hall

Maria Klawe is the president of Harvey Mudd College. She joined Harvey Mudd from Princeton University after serving 14 years at the University of British Columbia. Prior to UBC, Klawe spent eight years with IBM Research in California and two years at the University of Toronto. Part of the Clark Science Center’s “She Is a Scientist” series and co-sponsored by the Lazarus Center for Career Development.

danah boyd

danah boyd

Living in a Culture of Algorithms

Wednesday, March 30, 2016, 5 p.m.
Weinstein Auditorium, Wright Hall

Social media scholar danah boyd is a principal researcher at Microsoft Research and the founder of the Data & Society Research Institute. She is a visiting professor at New York University’s Interactive Telecommunications Program and a faculty affiliate at Harvard’s Berkman Center. Her research examines the intersection between technology and society.

Steinem

Gloria Steinem

Monday, March 28, 2016, 5 p.m.
John M. Greene Hall

Gloria Steinem, Smith class of 1956, is a feminist, journalist, and social and political activist. She has been a leader and a voice for the feminist movement since the 1960s. Through her writing, speeches and activism, she has inspired generations of women and men to look at the world differently, change the rules and right society’s wrongs. A founder of Ms. magazine, she is the author of several books, including Revolution From Within (1992) and My Life on the Road (2015).

Imani Perry

Imani Perry

Which Feminism Do We Choose?

Tuesday, March 1, 2016, 5 p.m.
Weinstein Auditorium, Wright Hall

Imani Perry is the Hughes-Rogers Professor of African American Studies and a faculty associate in the Program in Law and Public Affairs at Princeton University. An interdisciplinary scholar who studies race and African American culture, she is the author of More Beautiful and More Terrible: The Embrace and Transcendence of Racial Inequality in the United States and Prophets of the Hood: Politics and Poetics in Hip Hop.

Frank Bruni

Frank Bruni

Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be

Tuesday, October 20, 2015, 5 p.m.
Weinstein Auditorium, Wright Hall

Journalist Frank Bruni is a former White House correspondent and chief restaurant critic for The New York Times. In June 2011, he was named an op-ed columnist for the newspaper. He is the author of two bestselling books: Born Round, a memoir about his family's love of food and his own struggles with overeating, and Ambling Into History, about George W. Bush. His new book is Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be: An Antidote to the College Admission Mania.

Frank Bruni

Linda Greenhouse

What the Supreme Court’s Same-Sex Marriage Decision Teaches Us About the Constitution

Friday, September 18, 2015, 1 p.m.
Alumnae House Conference Hall

Linda Greenhouse, a senior research scholar and journalist in residence at Yale Law School, covered the Supreme Court for The New York Times between 1978 and 2008. She was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in Journalism in 1998 “for her consistently illuminating coverage of the United States Supreme Court.” She now writes a biweekly column on law.

Jennifer Finney Boylan

Jennifer Finney Boylan

She’s Not There: A Life in Two Genders

Thursday, April 30, 2015, 4:30 p.m.
John M. Greene Hall

Jennifer Finney Boylan, professor of English at Barnard College and New York Times contributing writer, is the author of the memoir She’s Not There: A Life in Two Genders, the first bestseller by a transgender American.

Jeffrey Sachs

Jeffrey Sachs

The Age of Sustainable Development

Wednesday, April 8, 2015, 4:30 p.m.
Weinstein Auditorium, Wright Hall

Economist Jeffrey Sachs is director of The Earth Institute, Quetelet Professor of Sustainable Development, and Professor of Health Policy and Management at Columbia University. He is known for his work on the challenges of economic development, environmental sustainability, poverty alleviation, debt cancellation and globalization.

Claudia Rankine

Claudia Rankine

February 23, 2015
Sweeney Concert Hall, Sage Hall

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Claudia Rankine is the author of Citizen: An American Lyric (2014). A nominee for the National Book Award in poetry, Citizen is described by BookForum as “an anatomy of American racism in the new millennium, a slender, musical book that arrives with the force of a thunderclap.”

Larry Summers

Larry Summers

The American Economic Growth Challenge

Monday, March 31, 2014
Weinstein Auditorium, Wright Hall

President Emeritus and Charles W. Eliot University Professor, Harvard University; Board Chair of the Center for Global Development; Secretary of the Treasury (1999–2001); Director of the National Economic Council (2009–10)