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Ph.D. Faculty

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Adjunct Professor

 Edith Fraser has been associated with the Smith College School for Social Work since the early 90s as a doctoral student (earning her Ph.D. in 1994) and as an adjunct faculty member. Fraser has held a number of leadership positions in social work programs, including as director of field education and later professor, chair of social work and director of faculty development and research at Oakwood University in Alabama. She was also a professor and chair of social work and psychology at Alabama A&M University, retiring in 2014. Fraser continues to maintain a practice as a marriage and family counselor, and she is a senior Fulbright specialist, providing consultation and direction to social work programs internationally. At the SSW, she has taught Group Theory Practice and Racism in the United States, and served as a Bertha Capen Reynolds Fellow for many years. In 2015, Fraser was inducted into the Alabama Social Work Hall of Fame.

Adjunct Associate Professor

Tanya Greathouse has been part of the Smith College School for Social Work adjunct faculty since 1997, when she completed her doctorate at the school. She teaches in the M.S.W. and Ph.D. programs, focusing on field education, clinical practice, supervision and multicultural awareness, and served as the Marta Sotomayor Fellow in 2015 and 2016. Greathouse is also a lecturer in the Social Work Department of Metropolitan State University of Denver, and serves as the co-coordinator of their Social Work Healthcare Education and Leadership Scholars (HEALS) program and the co-faculty adviser of their Building Allies of Diversity Student Group. Outside of academia, Greathouse is a psychotherapist in private practice, and a consultant trainer to organizations on issues around implicit bias. 

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Carolyn Gruber earned her M.S.W. at the Smith College School for Social Work, and has served on the faculty since 1996. She spent the early part of her social work career as a clinician and supervisor in mental health facilities, primarily working with children. Since the early 1980s, Gruber has held academic positions, as a faculty member of the Washington School for Psychiatry and the Virginia Commonwealth University School for Social Work, and then as the assistant director and field coordinator of the Northern Virginia campus of VCU. She was also a consultant at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Before her retirement, Gruber was the president of the Clinical Social Work Institute—a freestanding Ph.D. program in clinical social work—and later its dean. Throughout her career, Gruber has maintained a private practice with individuals, couples and families with children, adolescents and adults.

Adjunct Professor

Johnnie Hamilton-Mason earned her doctorate at the Smith College School for Social Work and has been a professor at Simmons College School of Social Work since 1991. Her scholarship and research interests include African American women and families, the intersection of cross cultural theory and practice, HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment, and teaching and learning issues related to diversity. In addition to teaching, Hamilton-Mason co-founded Simmons’ Pharnal Longus Academy for Undoing Racism, served as a Harvard University W.E.B. Du Bois Institute non-resident fellow in African American research and as a researcher at the University of Texas’ Hurricane Katrina Researcher Collaborative, and conducts trainings through the Osiris Family Institute. In 2013, she received the Massachusetts NASW Social Work Educator of the Year Award. Hamilton-Mason also maintains a practice as a senior clinician with the South End Community Mental Health Center in Boston.

Adjunct Professor

 A professor in the Department of Psychology at Bethany College in West Virginia, John Howard Hull has been part of the Smith College School for Social Work summer program since 2013. At Smith, Hull has taught Statistical Methods for Data Analysis I and II, and he advises doctoral students on research design and conducting cooperative research. In addition to his long tenure at Bethany College, Hull has taught in Seoul, South Korea, and Christchurch, New Zealand, and has been honored with numerous teaching awards. Outside of his academic work, Hull often serves as a guest or interim minister, has worked on Habitat for Humanity projects in Romania and Mongolia, and is a certified firefighter and EMT with the Bethany Volunteer Fire Department.

Lecturer

Since 1993, Arlene Montgomery has taught clinical classes at the University of Texas at Austin School of Social Work and at the Smith College School for Social Work, where she earned her doctorate. In addition to teaching at the University of Texas, she serves as a field placement supervisor and as clinical supervisor of graduate social work interns and licensed master’s social workers. Montgomery also maintains a private clinical practice in Austin, focusing on clients affected by trauma and dysfunctional family systems. She is the author of Neurobiology Essentials for Clinicians: What Every Therapist Needs to Know (2013) and presents widely on topics such as foster care issues, anti-social children, forming therapeutic alliances with difficult children and adolescents, eating disorder identification in schools, and neurobiological findings relevant to the therapeutic alliance, treatment considerations and ethical considerations.

Adjunct Professor

Judith Rosenberger is a professor in the Silberman School of Social Work at Hunter College. Her areas of expertise include clinical practice, psychodynamic theories, clinical practice with diverse populations and co-occurring disorders. Rosenberg is also a training analyst and senior supervisor with the Postgraduate Psychoanalytic Society and psychopathology faculty at the Chinese American Psychoanalytic Alliance. Her published work includes Relational Social Work Practice with Diverse Populations (editor) and Brief Case Studies in Abnormal Psychology (co-author). In addition to teaching, Rosenberg has maintained a private practice for more than 40 years, with a psychodynamic psychotherapy orientation.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Karen Saakvitne is a licensed clinical psychologist in private practice in Northampton, Mass., with an expertise in trauma and child abuse. She also provides clinical consultation to therapists and mental health programs and treatment centers. Saakvitne has taught in the Smith School for Social Work since 2008. Before establishing her practice, she was the director of the Traumatic Stress Institute/Center for Adult & Adolescent Psychotherapy in South Windsor, Conn., and worked with the Austen Riggs Center in Stockbridge, Mass., as well.

Adjunct Professor

Cynthia Shilkret is a psychologist in private practice with more than 40 years experience as a practitioner. She works with adults in short- and long-term psychotherapy, and provides psychological testing and clinical supervision and consultation. Shilkret has been an adjunct faculty member in the Smith College School for Social Work since 1980, and teaches in both the M.S.W. and Ph.D. programs.

Adjunct Associate Professor

Tina Wildhagen joined the Smith College Sociology Department faculty in 2008, after earning her doctorate at the University of Iowa, and has taught in the Smith College School for Social Work since 2015. Wildhagen’s work focuses on social inequality in the American education system and the development of the first-generation college student category. During the academic year, she teaches courses on privilege and power in American education, inequality in higher education and quantitative research methods, and in the summer teaches Advanced Social Theory. In 2014, the Smith College Student Government Association honored her with their Faculty Teaching