Skip Navigation

M.S.W. Faculty

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Ziblim Abukari is an assistant professor in the Department of Social Work at Westfield State University, having joined the faculty in 2011. His research interests include risks and resilience in high-risk youth, academic outcomes of high-risk youth, resilience across cultures, international social development and human security and social protection. Abukari is also a faculty field liaison and field instructor, and advises Westfield State’s Social Work Students Association Group. During the Smith summer program, he teaches Social Work Research Methods. Before his academic career, Abukari was a community social worker and youth services advocate, and worked as a community organizer and trainer with nonprofits in Ghana on food security, agribusiness development, micro-credit and water and sanitation.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Rose Marie Äikäs is a professor at CUNY-Queensborough Community College, where she teaches courses in criminal justice and social work. Her current research projects measure college readiness in incarcerated students, and look at the education and internship experiences of human service students who were formerly incarcerated. Before her academic positions,  Äikäs worked in a variety of mental health settings, including in a program providing support for formerly incarcerated people pursuing college degrees, as a senior case manager in halfway houses, as a mental health clinician in prisons, and as a counselor in children and family services. In 2016, New York State Corrections and Community Supervision named her Volunteer of the Year. At the Smith College School for Social Work Äikäs has taught Substance Abuse Policy, Treatment and Services; and Criminal Justice Policies: Implications for Social Work Practice.

Lecturer

Elizabeth Anable is doctoral candidate at Smith College School for Social Work and a clinical supervisor with Clinical & Support Options in Northampton, where she manages a team of practitioners in the crisis department. Anable is also a certified Somatic Experiencing® practitioner, teaching assistant and training coordinator, and has a background in mindfulness and meditation practices. She specializes in the integrated treatment of trauma and chronic stress, and is interested in body-mind practices as an avenue for supporting activists and disenfranchised communities. In her research Anable focuses on the integration of body-mind practices and evidenced-based clinical interventions, psychophysiological measurement to improve assessment and treatment of trauma and PTSD, and post-traumatic growth and community resiliency work.

Ann Augustine is the assistant director of ServiceNet’s Northampton Clinic. Her long tenure with the mental health agency includes work at the outpatient clinics and substance abuse program. Augustine earned her M.S.W. at Smith College School for Social Work and a master’s degree in public policy at Rutgers University. As a SSW adjunct professor, she has taught the clinical practice sequence and Child Welfare Policy and Services. She was also a Bertha Reynolds Senior Fellow.

Lecturer

Jaycelle Basford-Pequet earned her M.S.W. at the Smith College School for Social Work and currently works in Northampton as the director of the Institute for Emerging Adulthood. This group private practice engages people of color and LGB and trans identified adults within an anti-oppression framework. Basford-Pequet also teaches B.S.W. courses in the Elms College Social Work Department. Before joining her current practice, Basford-Pequet was a clinician in California, most recently a psychiatric social worker with South Van Ness Adult Behavioral Health Services. In this position, she worked with LGB and trans identified adults living with HIV/AIDS and/or dealing with issues related to gender, as well as accompanying clients in social transitions and gender-confirming surgery within the public health system.

Lecturer

Addie Wyman Battalen is a social work doctoral student at Boston College. Her research interests include mental health and well-being with LGBT and multiracial families; increasing access to services for new parents, especially related to adoption, same-sex parenting and inter-racial families; school social work; and child and adolescent trauma. She is a research assistant on several projects, including the longitudinal, qualitative Minnesota/Texas Adoption Research Project (MTARP), the Lubben Social Networking Scale (LSNS) and a large-scale breastfeeding policy research project. Wyman Battalen’s other work in the field includes serving as a school social worker in the McAuliffe Regional School in Framingham, Mass., and as a clinician at the Justice Resource Institute in Concord, Mass.

Adjunct Professor

Adjunct Associate Professor

Stephen Bradley is a psychotherapist in private practice in Northampton as well as a clinician with the Northampton Center for Couples Therapy. Bradley earned his M.S.W. at the Smith College School for Social Work and his M.Ed. in counseling at UMass Amherst. He has also trained in family therapy, multi-systemic therapy, adolescent and family DBT, and Gottman Method couples therapy. Before his current tenure at NCCT, he worked with the Village for Families and Children, and Northampton Center for Children and Families Cutchins Programs, among other agencies. Bradley has been among the adjunct faculty at the SSW since 2010, teaching Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families, and an elective course integrating wraparound and neuro-developmental approaches to treatment. He has also served as a faculty field adviser.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Suzanne Brown, who earned her M.S.W. at the Smith College School for Social Work, is an assistant professor at the Wayne State University School of Social Work in Detroit, Mich., and maintains a private practice in Ypsilanti, Mich. Her areas of expertise include mothers with substance use disorders; effects of neighborhood violence and social networks on parenting competence among mothers; neurobiological dimensions of addiction and trauma; and gay and lesbian family formation and adoption. Before receiving her Ph.D., Brown was the clinical director of the May Institute in Boston, where she was responsible for supervising outpatient mental health services, case management services, and day treatment programs for adults and elders with persistent mental illness. Brown’s current projects include research on the perceived parenting competence among mother with substance use disorders and on parenting enhancements in substance abuse treatment.

Adjunct Professor

Erin Buzuvis is a professor at the Western New England University School of Law as well as the director of their Center for Gender & Sexuality Studies. Buzuvis researches and writes about gender and discrimination in sport, including such topics as the interrelation of law and sports culture, intersecting sexual orientation and race discrimination in women's athletics, retaliation against coaches in collegiate women’s sports, the role of interest surveys in Title IX compliance, participation policies for transgender and intersex athletes, and Title IX and competitive cheer. She is also the co-founder of the Title IX Blog, an interdisciplinary resource for news, legal developments, commentary and scholarship about Title IX’s application to athletics and education. Before joining the WNEU faculty, Buzuvis clerked for Judge Thomas Ambro of the Third Circuit and practiced law at Goodwin Procter in Boston. She has been an adjunct professor at the Smith School for Social Work since 2009 and teaches Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Social Policy.

Lecturer

Theresa Cain recently earned her doctorate from the Smith College School for Social Work. She teaches at the Springfield College School of Social Work and is a psychotherapist in private practice. Cain’s scholarly and clinical specialties include adoption, LGBTQ populations, mindfulness, mental health and trauma. Her dissertation focused on identity and coming out experiences of lesbians who were adopted. She is a consultation group leader with A Home Within, supervising mental health clinicians providing pro bono therapy to current or former foster care youth

Lecturer

Carter J. Carter is a doctoral candidate at the Smith College School for Social Work as well as a social worker in private practice in the Boston area and at the Brookline Community Mental Health Center. Carter’s research interests include interdisciplinary perspectives on social work and psychoanalysis, the philosophy of social work, rhetoric in psychotherapy and social work, psychoanalytic theory and narcissistic personality disorder. In addition to his practice, Carter serves as a volunteer forensic evaluator with the Physicians for Human Rights Asylum Network and a volunteer mental health clinician with the Massachusetts Medical Reserve Corps.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Lecturer & Adjunct Instructor

Mamta Dadlani is a clinical psychologist in private practice in Berkeley, Calif., and a scholar of multicultural concerns in the Division of Psychoanalysis of the American Psychological Association. She earned her doctorate at UMass Amherst and completed a two-year postgraduate fellowship at the Massachusetts Institute of Psychoanalysis–West. Dadlani’s research and practice interests include psychotherapy process and relational change, countertransference use and management, intergroup dialogue, hip hop and healing, mental health challenges for people of color in higher education, and community partnerships. In the Smith summer program she teaches courses in socio-cultural concepts, group theory and practice, research methods and community practice. Dadlani is also a Marta Sotomayor Fellow, providing consultation regarding issues of structural oppression and change processes to SSW community.

Adjunct Professor

Maria del Mar Farina earned both her M.S.W. and her doctorate at the Smith College School for Social Work. She is currently an assistant professor in the M.S.W. program at Westfield State University, and the author of the forthcoming book Ethnic Identity and U.S. Immigration Policy Reform: American Citizenship and Belonging amongst Hispanic Immigrants. At the SSW, del Mar Farina teaches courses in social work practice, helped redesign the clinical practice sequence, and she has served as the assistant director of field office. Del Mar Farina also maintains a private practice in Longmeadow and Springfield, Mass., and had a long tenure as a clinician in the Smith College Counseling Center. In addition to her work in social work practice and education, del Mar Farina worked for many years in nonprofit management.

Adjunct Professor

Carolyn du Bois has worked in the field work office at the Smith College School for Social Work since 1989 and was its director from 1997 to 2017. In this work, she planned for and implemented the field-based education of all SSW students, in over 120 agencies across the United States. In the summer program, Du Bois teaches in the Social Work Practice Sequence and for many years served as a faculty field adviser. Du Bois is also a graduate of the program, having earned her M.S.W. at the SSW. Before her tenure at Smith, she was a psychiatric social worker at UMass Amherst’s Health Services. In addition to her role at Smith, du Bois maintains a private practice in Northampton.

Adjunct Professor

Seth Dunn has taught at the Smith College School for Social Work since the summer of 2003, and has been the course coordinator for Family Theory for Clinical Social Work Practice. He has also had a long history supervising and training Smith M.S.W. students during their field education. In addition to teaching, Dunn is a clinician and director of quality management with ServiceNet in Northampton, and maintains a private practice. His areas of focus include family/marital problems and substance abuse disorders. For more than twenty years, Dunn served on the New York Council on Accreditation as a team leader and peer reviewer in their accreditation of human service operations. This included several years as the peer reviewer for the United States Marine Corps Counseling & Family Advocacy Programs.

Sara Plachta Elliott is the executive director of the Youth Development Resource Center of the Skillman Foundation in Detroit, Mich. The Skillman Foundation helps Detroit children prepare for college and careers; the YDRC provides technical assistance around collecting data to improve the foundation’s programs. Before launching the YDRC, Elliott was an evaluation fellow and research associate with the foundation. She earned her doctorate in social policy at the Heller School of Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University. She is a member of the board of directors of Ruby’s Rainbow, an organization dedicated to the higher educational needs of adults with Down syndrome, and SPEC Associates, specializing in evaluations of nonprofit, governmental and educational organizations.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Kristin Evans is currently the associate director of the Counseling Center at Smith College and will complete her doctorate at the Smith College School for Social Work this year. Evans came to Smith with nearly 15 years experience as a psychotherapist in private practice and mental health agencies. In the M.S.W program, Evans teaches Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families, Clinical Practice with Children, Problems of Biopsychosocial Functioning, and Comparative Theories. She also serves as a course coordinator and academic adviser for the SSW, and mentors Smith doctoral students. Evans’ current research focuses on social work education, specifically the role of peer mentoring in doctoral student learning.

Deborah Fauntleroy has more than 40 years’ experience in a diversity of human services positions. She is currently the associate director of the Parent Professional Advocacy League, a Massachusetts grassroots family organization that advocates for improved access to mental health services for children, youth and their families. Fauntleroy also spent many years at the Boston Medical Center, first as a clinical supervisor and later as the program manager of MCI/Youth, a mobile crisis intervention service for youth and families.

Lecturer & Adjunct Instructor

Ray Fisher completed his M.S.W. at the Smith College School for Social work in 2003. He is a family based clinician at the Children’s Crisis Treatment Center in Philadelphia and a therapist and adjunct faculty member with the Council for Relationships in Philadelphia, providing psychotherapy to individuals, couples, families, and Iraq/Afghanistan war veterans, developing educational programs, supervising licensed social workers and providing outreach to school programs. Fisher is also a senior associate at the Teleos Leadership Institute in Elkins Park, Pa. Fisher’s previous work includes supervising therapists at four alternative schools in Philadelphia and providing acute inpatient psychiatry at the Department of Veterans Affairs in Coatesville, Pa.

Adjunct Associate Professor

Laura Flanagan has been part of the Smith College School for Social Work adjunct faculty since 1985. She has also taught at the New York University School of Social Work and the Hunter College School of Social Work. Flanagan has a private practice in New York City and provides counseling and psychological character development coaching for the young opera students at V.O.I.C.Experience. She is also the co-editor of Inside Out and Outside In: Psychodynamic Clinical Theory and Psychopathology in Contemporary Multicultural Contexts, along with retired SSW professor Joan Berzoff and fellow adjunct professor Patricia Hertz.

Adjunct Professor

Edith Fraser has been associated with the Smith College School for Social work since the early nineties as a doctoral student (earning her Ph.D. in 1994) and as an adjunct faculty member. Fraser has held a number of leadership positions in social work programs, including as director of field education and later professor, chair of social work and director of faculty development and research at Oakwood University in Alabama. She was also a professor and chair of social work and psychology at Alabama A&M University, retiring in 2014. Fraser continues to maintain a practice as a marriage and family counselor, and she is a senior Fulbright specialist, providing consultation and direction to social work programs internationally. At the SSW, she has taught Group Theory Practice and Racism in the United States, and served as a Bertha Capen Reynolds Fellow for many years. In 2015, Fraser was inducted into the Alabama Social Work Hall of Fame.

Lecturer

Laura Sachiko Fugikawa has spent the past year as a visiting professor in the Study of Women and Gender and English Language and Literature at Smith College. Her work explores how culture impacts history and how history is retold through cultural works, and she teaches courses on United States multiethnic literature and film, gender, sexuality and women of color feminisms. Fugikawa earned her doctorate in American studies and ethnicity, as well as a certificate in gender studies from the University of Southern California. Her current manuscript, Displacements: The Cultural Politics of Relocation, is a comparative analysis of narratives surrounding mid-20th-century relocation and assimilation campaigns directed at Japanese-American and American-Indian communities. Fugikawa is also the co-founder and co-director of the Queer Asian American Archives at the University of Illinois Chicago, which includes material culture and oral histories about community organizing in the Midwest.

Adjunct Professor

Mary Gannon is a senior educational equity consultant with the Vermont Partnership for Fairness and Diversity in Brattleboro, Vt. In this role, she develops training programs, interventions and consultations for institutions and organizations, focusing on multicultural and diversity education, racism, poverty, and school climate. Her clients have included public and private schools, colleges, law enforcement and state and municipal governments. Gannon earned her doctorate in education at UMass Amherst in the social justice education concentration. She has been an adjunct professor at the Smith School for Social Work since 1997, teaching Racism in the United States: Implications for Social Workers, and Dismantling Institutional Racism: The Challenge for Social Workers.

Lecturer

Zev Ganz works as an intake coordinator, therapist, instructor and clinical supervisor at the Family Institute of Neve Yerushalayim in Jerusalem, Israel, where he completed his postgraduate training in individual and family therapy. In addition, Ganz is a therapist in the Unit for the Treatment of Sexual Abuse at the Shiluv Institute for the Family, also in Jerusalem, and has a private practice in Israel, working with families, children and individuals. Ganz is currently completing his doctorate at the Smith College School for Social Work.

Lecturer

Jackie Gelb is the founder and principal of Community Ventures Consulting, which provides strategic growth planning and practical support to nonprofits and public community based initiatives. Since launching the consulting group in 1997, she has worked with EOHHS/MassHealth–Children’s Behavioral Health Initiative, the Department of Mental Health, Child & Adolescent Services, the MA Children’s Behavioral Health Workforce Collaborative, the Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers, GLAD, Casa Esperanza and MassEquality. Gelb was also the founding executive director of YouthBuild Boston, a youth development organization that engaged unemployed young people to renovate abandoned buildings as affordable housing, earn a high diploma and gain employment or a path to college.

Lecturer

John Gill is the chief operating officer of Beats Rhymes and Life in Oakland, Calif., an organization, developed by Smith College School for Social Work alum Tomás Alvarez III, that uses the process of creating rap music to engage troubled teens in mental health services. He is also dean of the BRL Academy, which is a career pipeline program to train young adults between the ages of 18 and 26 to become social workers and leaders. In this role, he has designed course tracks in clinical practice, clinical theory, social justice, teaching artistry and professional development. Gill earned his M.S.W. at the SSW in 2007, and spent many working with youth and families involved in foster care and the juvenile justice system before beginning his work with BRL.

Adjunct Professor

Paul Gitterman has been associated with the Smith College School for Social Work since the early 1990s, first as an M.S.W. student, and then as a clinical instructor and as an adjunct professor. He also holds a master’s degree in Psychoanalytic Developmental Psychology from the University College London and the Anna Freud Center. Gitterman works at Williams College Psychological Services, providing psychotherapy, supervision, and outreach services. In addition, he maintains private practices in Williamstown and Pittsfield, Mass.

Lecturer

Julie Guyot-Diangone is on faculty of the Howard University School of Social Work and American University’s School of International Service. Her work focuses on displaced populations—immigrants and refugees, as well as street children, sex workers and other communities that operate on the margins of society—within the context of macro policy systems and social service programming. Her current work focuses on the cultural strengths embedded within the African American experience of historical trauma. Before completing her doctorate, Guyot-Diangone was a visiting research scholar at Oxford University’s Refugee Study Center. She spent four years working with orphans and street children in Ukraine and Georgia, worked in Tanzania monitoring and helping to expand an early childhood development program, and served as a field researcher on resilience and marginalized youth in Sierra Leone. At the Smith College School for Social Work, Guyot-Diangone will teach Introduction to U.S. Social Welfare Policy and two sessions of Racism in the United States: Implications for Practice. 

Adjunct Associate Professor

Camille Hall, who earned her Ph.D. at the Smith College School for Social Work, is a professor in the University of Tennessee College of Social Work. Hall’s research interests include examining micro, meso and macro risk and resilience factors among African American individuals, families and communities, with a specific focus on women and adult children of alcoholics, and she is the co-author of African American Behavior in the Social Environment: New Perspectives. Hall has also worked in private and public social service and mental health agencies as a clinical social worker for more than 25 years. 

Adjunct Associate Professor

Lecturer

Daryllyn Harris is a doctoral student at the Smith College School for Social Work. Before beginning her graduate work, Harris worked in child welfare and in clinical settings. She has also taught at the University of Washington in Seattle and was a clinical field instructor with B.A.S.W. and M.S.W. students. Harris’ research interests include exploring the use of community and/or faith-based organizations to increase mental health awareness and treatment utilization within the African-American community. She is also interested in early exposure to trauma, attachment and depression. Harris is a Ph.D. fellow in the Counsel on Social Work Education Minority Fellow Program. The program works to reduce health disparities and improve healthcare outcomes of racially and ethnically diverse populations by increasing the number of culturally competent behavioral health professionals with doctoral degrees available to underserved populations.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Crystal Hayes earned her M.S.W. at the Smith College School for Social Work and is a doctoral student at the School of Social Work at the University of Connecticut. She began her social work career in community-based mental health, with a focus on maternal and pediatric mental health, and in nonprofit leadership development and management. Hayes’ practice and research interests include reproductive oppression, women’s health and violence against women; community engagement and partnerships; global social work and leadership; social work and social justice pedagogy; and race, gender and criminal justice. Her current research projects look at the Prison Birth Project’s anti-shackling advocacy campaign in Massachusetts and the FatherWorks program. In addition to the SSW, Hayes teaches in the social work departments of Westfield State University and North Carolina State University. At the SSW, Hayes teaches Social Welfare History and Policy and serves as a thesis adviser.

Adjunct Professor

Patricia Hertz earned her M.S.W. at the Smith College School for Social Work in 1982. She is currently a clinical and administrative consultant at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, providing individual and group supervision and consultation to social work staff and interns, as well as running a family therapy seminar on the inpatient psychiatry unit. She is also a clinical consultant at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute and a consultant with the Clown Care Unit of the Big Apple Circus. In addition to her hospital work, Hertz maintains a private psychotherapy practice, working with adolescents, adults, couples and families. A Smith adjunct professor since 1988, Hertz teaches courses on personality theory and psychopathology, and a senior integrative seminar. She is the co-editor, along with Joan Berzoff and Laura Melano Flanagan, of Inside Out and Outside In: Psychodynamic Clinical Theory and Practice in Contemporary Multicultural Contexts.

Lecturer

Andrew Hoang is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Social Work and Social Administration at the University of Hong Kong. Hoang’s research interests include school social work, school counseling, anti-oppressive practice and the philosophy and sociology of education. His approach to research seeks to addresses issues of power, equity and social justice in direct practice, and the transformative possibilities of school-based support services, particularly the school social work profession. Before entering social work, Hoang worked as a border services officer for the Canadian federal government and also worked in university support services, running programs and advocacy campaigns for ethno-racialized students, LGBT+ students and students with dis/abilities. In 2016, he was a visiting international scholar at the Smith College School for Social Work.

Adjunct Professor

Debra Hull is a psychology professor and program coordinator of the mental health sciences concentration at Wheeling Jesuit University in West Virginia, where she’s received many teaching awards. She teaches courses in methods, human sexuality and industrial/organizational psychology, and her research interests include teaching strategies, body image, ambiguous dating situations and attitudes toward health. During the Smith College School for Social Work summer program, Hull teaches Advanced Research Methods in the M.S.W. program. Hull is also an EMT with her community’s volunteer fire department and frequently travels abroad on service trips.

Lecturer

Christie Hunnicutt is the Vice President of Adult Services of Wellmore Behavioral Health in Waterbury, Conn., as well a psychotherapist in private practice, with clinical specialties in eating disorders, women’s issues and trauma. Earlier in her career, Hunnicutt had a long tenure at BHcare in Ansonia, Conn. She is a clinical instructor at Yale University and teaches at Southern Connecticut State University. Hunnicutt is also a doctoral student at the Smith College School for Social Work, and has published on doctoral program curricula and supervision in public sector behavioral health.

Lecturer & Adjunct Instructor

A national leader in the gay civil rights movement, Cheryl Jacques was the first openly gay state senator in Massachusetts history, serving the Norfolk, Bristol and Middlesex District from 1992 to 2004. She also served as president of the Human Rights Campaign, spearheading their defeat of the Federal Marriage Amendment in 2005. Jacques has taught law at Suffolk University, George Washington University and the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, among other institutions. She is currently an administrative judge with the Department of Industrial Accidents, in Springfield, Mass., trying workers’ compensation cases.

Adjunct Associate Professor

Donna Jeffery is on the faculty of the School of Social Work at the University of Victoria, in British Columbia, and served as its acting director from 2015–2107. Her scholarly interests include anti-racist and critical pedagogies, social work education and professional identity, and knowledge production and modes of inquiry. Jeffery is the co-editor of Unravelling Encounters: Ethics, Knowledge, and Resistance Under Neoliberalism and serves as a consulting editor for Affilia: The Journal of Women and Social Work. At the Smith College School for Social Work, Jeffery has taught Racism in the United States: Implications for Social Work Practice.

Lecturer​

Shveta Kumaria is a doctoral candidate in social work at Loyola University Chicago and completed a fellowship with the Chicago Institute of Psychoanalysis. Her research and teaching interests include clinical practice, wisdom research, psychotherapy integration, common factors, cultural factors in psychotherapy, teaching methods and pedagogical inquiry. Kumaria’s current research includes evaluating a HRSA-SAMSHA–funded training grant for students from underrepresented groups to train in working in primary care settings in medically underserved areas, and managing a HRSA-SAMSHA–funded training grant on interprofessional practice with at-risk youth. She is also a member of the Collaborative Research Network of the Society for Psychotherapy Research. Kumaria has been part of the adjunct faculty at the Smith College School for Social Work since 2013 and teaches Cognitive Behavior and Therapy: 
Integrating CBT and Psychodynamic Techniques.

Callie Watkins Liu is completing her doctorate in social policy at the Heller School of Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University and has earned a master’s degrees in social policy and regional planning as well. Her research focuses on organizational dynamics of social movements, student activism and race and intersectionality in academia. She is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships, including honors from the Ford Foundation. Liu has a long history in mentorship programs, serving most recently as a Posse Foundation mentor and the program director of AHEAD, both in the Boston area.

Adjunct Professor

Geoffrey Locke earned his M.S.W. and Ph.D. at the Smith School for Social Work and has taught in the school for more than a decade. His courses include Knowing, Not Knowing, and Muddling Through; Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families; Brief Psychodynamic Therapy; and Comparative Psychodynamic Theories for Clinical Social Work Practice. He has also served as a faculty field adviser and as part of the Reaching for Excellence faculty. Locke is in private practice in Amherst, Mass., specializing in the long-term treatment of adults with complex mental health and addiction related disorders, including compulsive gambling. He is licensed as a Massachusetts Problem Gambling Specialist, a Certified Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselor and a Certified Gambling Specialist.

Adjunct Professor

Gael McCarthy is a clinical psychologist in private practice in Durham, N.C. who earned her doctorate at the Smith College School for Social Work. During the Smith summer program, McCarthy teaches clinical practice, child development and research methods, and also serves SSW as a clinical supervisor.

Adjunct Associate Professor

Patricia McManamy is a psychotherapist with ServiceNet, in Northampton, working with children, adolescents, families and adults, with a focus on trauma, adoption, child abuse and sexual behavior problems in children, as well as narrative, play and expressive arts therapies. In addition to her practice, McManamy is the director of the Office of Counseling, Prevention and Victim Services at the Diocese of Springfield, Mass., coordinating outreach, advocacy and therapeutic services to victims of clergy abuse. She also serves as an expert witness in child and family evaluations for the Committee for Public Counsel Services. McManamy earned her M.S.W. at Smith College School for Social Work in 2000, and has taught theories of child development courses in the Human Behavior in the Social Environment Sequence since 2008.

Lecturer & Adjunct Instructor

Jesse Metzger is a clinical psychologist and the training director of the Multicultural Psychology Internship Program (MPIP), part of the Behavioral Health Network. The MPIP is a training site based in the School Street Counseling Institute, a community mental health clinic in Springfield, Mass. Metzger’s clinical and academic interests include psychotherapy process and outcomes, psychoanalytic theory and practice, personality disorders, defense mechanisms, self-disclosure in psychotherapy, attachment theory in the context of psychotherapy, and the nature of clinical education and training. She is also a writing consultant and teacher, working with academic professionals, students and organizations.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Tamarah Moss is on the faculty of the Howard University School of Social Work in Washington, D.C. Her research and teaching interests include community, policy and public health practice; global and online social work education; HIV and AIDS; practice and program evaluation; and reproductive, sexual and mental health disparities and service delivery (with adolescents, immigrants, refugees and LGBTQ communities). Moss is also senior technical adviser to the Global Center for Behavioral Health in Washington, D.C., where she has been the principal investigator on proposals to address violence against adolescents and young girls, and lead workshop presenter on the link between gender-based violence and HIV, adolescents and the needs of trans youth. In addition to her work, Moss volunteers for the Health Disparities Initiative of American Psychological Association and the Center Global Program of the D.C. Center for the LGBT Community.

Lecturer

Yudy Muneton is a doctoral candidate at the Smith College School for Social Work as well as a social worker with the Critical Care, Anesthesia and Perioperative Extension (CAPE) Program at Boston Children’s Hospital. Until recently, Muneton was a research mental health clinician with the Disparities Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital and an assistant project director at Dana Farber’s Center for Community-Based Research. Muneton’s research interests include cancer disparities and prevention among racial and ethnic minority populations, health promotion, disparities in access to mental health treatment, and child and adolescent behavioral health, and she has extensive experience working on community-based research studies in immigrant populations. In 2016, she earned the Smith College Selma Brown Scholarship.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Mareike Muszynski has worked with Clinical & Support Options, a full-service behavioral health agency in Western Massachusetts, for nearly a decade. Starting as a social worker, she is now the clinical outpatient supervisor. Muszynski earned her M.S.W. at the Smith College School for Social Work in 2009. She’s been part of the SSW faculty since 2012, and teaches Racism in the United States: Implications for Social Work Practice, a core course she co-developed. Muszynski also teaches trainings on diversity and equity, both for Smith College and for organizations throughout Western Massachusetts.

Lecturer

J. Aleah Nesteby, a nationally recognized trans health provider, is the Director of LGBTQ Health Services for Cooley Dickinson Health Care in Northampton, Mass., and a family nurse practitioner at Northampton Family Medicine. She came to Cooley Dickinson in 2016, after many years at Baystate Health, where she worked to ensure availability of compassionate and nonjudgmental healthcare for the LGBTQ community in Western Massachusetts. Nesteby also worked for many years with Planned Parenthood in Boston and San Francisco. In addition to her clinical work, Nesteby lectures widely on LGBTQ health care and serves as a volunteer Transline consultant, providing advice about treatment of transgender patients to health care providers, both nationally and internationally. In 2015, the Stonewall Center, UMass Amherst’s LGBTQ support office, named Nesteby their Community Partner of the Year.

Lecturer

AndreAs Neumann-Mascis is founder and developer of The Meeting Point: a Multidimensional Center for Healing and Growth in Jamaica Plain, Mass., which serves the LGBT community, survivors and the disability community. Neumann-Mascis provides therapy, training and consultation, specializing in trauma and complex PTSD, as well as working with lesbian, gay, queer and gender variant people. Neumann-Mascis helped develop a women’s trauma program for an LGBT agency in San Francisco, has developed specialized trauma curricula for specific populations, including homeless and chronically mentally ill people, and provides trainings to universities, hospitals, providers, nonprofits and community members. At Smith College School for Social Work, Neumann-Mascis teaches Clinically Meaningful Understanding of Disability and Ableism.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Arden O’Donnell is an alum of the Smith College School for Social Work M.S.W. program and a doctoral student at Boston University. She has more than 15 years’ experience in palliative care both nationally and internationally, beginning with her work with HIV/AIDS patients in the United States and in Africa. O’Donnell is currently a research coordinator in cardiology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, where she’s the co-investigator on a pilot study of focused palliative care intervention with high-risk heart failure patients. She is also the founder and president of Coalition for Courage, a nonprofit based in Zimbabwe that provides educational and psychosocial support for HIV orphans. At SSW, O’Donnell teaches Introduction to Social Welfare Policy.

Adjunct Professor

Mary Olson’s association with the Smith College School for Social Work stretches back to the early 1980s. She earned her M.S.W. at the school, and has worked with Smith as a field supervisor, faculty field adviser, research fellow and adjunct professor. Olson is also an assistant professor at the UMass Medical School’s Department of Psychiatry and the founding director of the Institute for Dialogic Practice in Haydenville, Mass., which provides a two-year training program in Dialogic Practice and Open Dialogue. In her research she focuses on dialogical transformation in psychotherapy, the effects of larger systems (managed care), self-starvation as communication and the use of writing in therapy. In addition to teaching, Olson maintains a private practice in Northampton.

Adjunct Professor

Christopher O’Rourke is the director of social work training at the Albert & Jessie Danielsen Institute at Boston University, a mental health clinic and training institute focused on integrating spirituality and psychotherapy. He also maintains a psychotherapy practice in Boston, working with individuals, couples and groups. O’Rourke earned his M.S.W. at the Smith College School for Social Work as well as a Master’s of Divinity at Harvard Divinity School, and has taught in the SSW since 1998. His summer courses include The Role of Religion & Spirituality in Clinical Social Work, and Issues in the Treatment of Mental Illness: Treatment & Social Policy Perspectives. He has also served as a core faculty member of the school’s Contemplative Psychotherapy Certificate Program.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Jason Ostrander is an assistant professor in the Department of Social Work at Sacred Heart University, in Fairfield, Conn. Much of his work focuses on politics: political social work, political participation of social workers, policy, advocacy, voting and citizenship. But his interests also include social work education, program evaluation, Cambodian refugees, child welfare and school bullying. Until recently, Ostrander was a researcher-in-residence at the Nancy A. Humphreys Institute for Political Social Work at UConn, conducting research on advocacy, voting, social work education, and training social workers to engage and pursue careers in politics. He is currently the principal investigator on a study through Sacred Heart University entitled, “Impact of Social Workers’ Professional Socialization on Political Engagement Investigators.” Ostrander also works as a political consultant, has managed or advised numerous political campaigns, and served as economic development specialist for U.S. Congressman John Olver for many years. At the Smith College School for Social Work, he has taught Introduction to Social Welfare Policy and serves as a master’s thesis adviser.

Adjunct Professor

Nora Padykula earned her doctorate at the Smith College School for Social Work in 2008 and is currently a professor and director of the B.S.W. program at Westfield State University. Throughout her career, Padykula has worked in various clinical settings: crisis teams, supported housing programs for the chronically mentally ill, jails, prisons, addiction treatment programs, and outpatient clinics. She maintains a private practice as a clinical social worker, treating teens and adults, and specializing in addictions, psychological trauma and affective disorders.  Padykula’s research interests include the relationship between attachment trauma and addiction. Her current research includes a project examining the impact of early relationship attachments on the development of interpersonal skills among social work and nursing students, as well as a project that examines identity development among people who identify as transgender. At the SSW, Padykula teaches Dual Diagnosis.

Lecturer

Ruth Pearlman, who earned her M.S.W. at the Smith College School for Social Work, is a psychotherapist in private practice in Northampton, Mass. Her clinical specialties include veterans experiencing PTSD, college-aged students, familial survivors of suicide or homicide, adoption issues, ADD and ADHD, autism and bereavement. She is certified in Accelerated Resolution Therapy and in bereavement facilitation. Prior to establishing her private practice, Pearlman was a school-based clinician in Holyoke, Mass.

Adjunct Associate Professor

Nnamdi Pole is a professor in the Smith College Department of Psychology. He joined the Smith faculty in 2008, after several years at the University of Michigan. Pole’s work includes research on trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder, especially among police officers, service members and refugees, ethnic minority mental health and psychotherapy research. He has received numerous teaching awards, including a Smith campus-wide award based on student nominations. Pole is the chair of the Smith College Institutional Review Board and a member of the Human Subjects Research Committee. Outside of the college, he serves as a diversity consultant for Clinical and Support Options.

Lecturer

Marco Posadas is a doctoral student in the Smith College School for Social Work, focusing on long-term intensive psychodynamic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis with LGBTQ populations and other marginalized communities who have survived trauma. He is also a mental health counselor and clinical supervisor at the University of Toronto’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, maintains a private practice in Toronto, and has worked in the HIV sector for more than 20 years. Posadas teaches at the Toronto Psychoanalytic Society & Institute and has served as the Vice-President for North America for the International Psychoanalytical Studies Organization. In 2015, the Ontario Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration honored Posadas with their Ontario Volunteer Service Award.

Adjunct Associate Professor

Beth Prullage is the director of clinical programming at Providence Behavioral Health Hospital, a 125-bed inpatient psychiatric hospital in Holyoke, Mass. She has worked at Providence for more than 10 years in a number of clinical positions, including as the director of social services, and as the senior clinician on the child and adolescent unit. She is also part of the faculty of Re-Authoring Teaching, an online consultation group on Narrative Therapy and has served as a bereavement group counselor with the LGBT Aging Project. Prullage earned her M.S.W. at the Smith College School for Social Work in 2001. She has served as a field faculty adviser and thesis adviser, and has taught Family Approaches: Narrative Therapy with Youth and Families, Group Theory and Practice, Social Work Practice for Individuals and Families, Family Theory, Dialogic, Feminist and Narrative Family Therapy and Couples Therapy.

Lecturer

Cristian Rangel is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of Toronto. His scholarly interests include medical education, HIV/AIDS prevention, Canada’s gay Latino community and the HIV/AIDS vulnerability of immigrants. Rangel’s current research looks at how physicians’ humanitarian and advocacy work for refugee care and non-status immigrants influence human rights and political discourse in Canada and Spain. At the University of Toronto, Rangel teaches Introduction to Research Methods, The Sociology of Medicine, Community and Policy and Sociology of Health Care.

Lecturer

Julieann Rapoport is a long-time consultant and trainer in non-profit planning, development, and evaluation. Her work specializes in participatory methods of data collection and analysis to guide organizational and community assessments, planning processes, evaluation protocols, and program design, in the U.S. and abroad. As an adjunct faculty at the Smith College School for Social Work, Rapoport teaches courses on macro-practice.

Adjunct Professor

Lecturer

Jonnelle Reynolds is a doctoral candidate in Human Development and Family Studies at the University of Connecticut. Her research focuses on parenthood and parent-child relationships, specifically parent-child relationships in foster families, foster-parent training and interventions; and family violence and parenting. At UConn, Reynolds teaches Abuse & Violence in Families, and is engaged in a research project on supportive housing for families with dual vulnerabilities in child welfare and housing. In addition, she is a group facilitator/parent educator and a marriage and family therapist at UConn’s Humphrey Clinic.

Lecturer & Adjunct Instructor

Raymond Rodriguez is the founder and director of Aldea Counseling Service, a community-focused group psychotherapy practice in Harlem and Queens. He is a family therapist with clinical interests in trauma, immigration, diversity, LGBTQ empowerment, spirituality and working with marginalized communities. Rodriguez’s long history as a clinician includes working with the WTC Building Trades Support Network to provide psychotherapeutic and psychoeducational group therapy for union workers that were part of the cleanup effort after the WTC disaster and for families who lost a member in the disaster, as well as serving as dean of students at the One Spirit Interfaith Seminary. In addition to teaching at the Smith College School for Social Work, Rodriguez teaches in the Columbia University School of Social Work and the Trauma Studies Center of the Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy.

Lecturer

Michael Rogers is a Smith College School for Social Work doctoral candidate who also holds an M.B.A. in nonprofit management. Currently in private practice, he has more than 35 years experience as a social worker, most recently with Student Health & Counseling Services at the University of California, Davis, and at Sacramento State University. Rogers is also a longtime board member, and former president, of the California Society for Clinical Social Work.

Lecturer & Adjunct Instructor

Adjunct Professor

Tracy Ross, an alumna of the Smith College School for Social Work M.S.W. program, is a sociology professor at Holyoke Community College. At HCC, Ross teaches courses on intimate relationships, race and ethnicity, social problems, and substance abuse. During the SSW summer program she teaches History of American Social Welfare and Introduction to Social Problem Analysis. Before joining the faculty at HCC, Ross had a long tenure as a clinical social worker with social service organizations in Western Massachusetts, including the Pioneer Developmental Services and Early Intervention Program and the New England Learning Center for Women In Transition (NELCWIT).

Lecturer

Rachel Rybaczuk is a Ph.D. candidate in sociology at UMass Amherst and has deep roots in teaching and community organizing. Her research interests include food and farming; queer theory; race, class, gender, and sexuality; and social change and social movements. She has taught Social Class and its Implications for Social Work and Sociocultural Concepts in the Smith College School for Social Work. Rybaczuk has also taught at Boston University and Hampshire College, and has served as the Coordinator of Faculty Development Programs and the Coordinator of Graduate Student Teaching and Career Support at the Institute for Teaching Excellence & Faculty Development at UMass. As a community organizer in the Pioneer Valley, Rybaczuk has worked with Springfield No One Leaves, the Commonwealth Center for Change and Classes De Ingles, and she leads college workshops and trainings on recognizing and addressing issues around class and classism.

Lecturer

Anna May Seaver is a nurse practitioner who has worked in rehabilitation, geriatric care, addiction services, women’s health and community health settings. She is currently a family nurse practitioner at the Brattleboro Retreat, a psychiatric hospital and addiction treatment center in Brattleboro, Vt., as well as a registered nurse at the Pine Heights Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation in Brattleboro, Vt. Seaver is also an assistant professor of nursing at Vermont Technical College. At VTC she teaches Principles and Practice, Introductory and Advanced Pharmacology, Assessment Skills, Mental Health Nursing, and Transition from LPN to RN, and instructs LPNs and RNs in the clinical setting.

Adjunct Professor

Cara Segal has been part of the Smith College School for Social Work adjunct faculty since 2006, teaching psychology, social work theory and clinical practice courses to second- and third-year M.S.W. students. She is also a faculty field adviser and a research adviser. Segal earned her doctorate at the SSW in 2013, and she has a private psychotherapy practice in Northampton, working with adults and children. Before completing her Ph.D., she worked in a variety of mental health settings, including the Cooley Dickenson Out-Patient Mental Health Clinic, the Amherst College Counseling Center, and Women’s Prison Association & Home in New York City.

Lecturer

Shannon Sennott, a sex educator, gender justice activist, and LGBTQAI+ family therapist, earned her M.S.W. at the Smith College School for Social Work in 2008. She is a family therapist with the Institute for Dialogic Practice in Haydenville, Mass., a training center for the Finnish open dialogue approach, narrative orientations, and other family/community systems approaches to family psychotherapy. She works with differently gendered adolescents, individuals, trans families, and families with alternative family structures. Sennott is also a sex and gender therapist with Northampton Sex Therapy Associates in Florence, Mass., and she works with Gender and Family Project at the Ackerman Institute. In addition to her practices, Sennott founded and serves as director of education and curriculum development for Translate Gender, an advocacy and education organization addressing concerns specific to access for trans and/or gender nonconforming individuals.

Lecturer

Emily Sherwood has worked in public sector healthcare and human services policy and program development for more than 25 years. She is currently the Director of the Office of Behavioral Health at MassHealth (Massachusetts’ Medicaid agency), which is responsible for developing MassHealth’s behavioral health policies and managing the delivery of the behavioral health benefits to MassHealth members. Sherwood led the team that drafted the Massachusetts House of Representatives’ version of the landmark 2006 Health Care Access legislation. She also brings to her work extensive experience in the Massachusetts legislature, serving as chief of staff for Rep. David B. Cohen and research director on human services committees. In 2016, the Parent/Professional Advocacy League honored Sherwood with their Children’s Mental Health Champion Award.

Lecturer

Davey Shlasko is the founder and managing consultant of Think Again Training, an organization that educates students, professionals and community members on social justice topics, including gender diversity, LGB and trans inclusion, class/classism, queer theory, and models of oppression and liberation. An alum of Smith’s undergraduate program, Shlasko earned a master’s degree from UMass Amherst in social justice education. Shlasko is also a freelance editor specializing in academic writing. Shlasko worked for many years in direct service and supervision for human services, in the areas of health education/risk reduction counseling, workforce development and leadership training. At the Smith College School for Social Work, Shlasko teaches Sociocultural Concepts and Transgender Studies: Theory, Practice & Advocacy, and is currently serving as a Sotomayor Fellow, providing consultation regarding issues of structural oppression and change processes to SSW community.

Lecturer

Robert Simpson is the co-founder and president of Simpson Van Oot & Associates, which provides leadership, strategic and governance counsel to organizations, particularly in health care, educational institutions, environmental, and state or regionally based organizations. He is also a consultant and executive coach with Linkage, Inc., in Burlington, Vt. Until recently, Simpson was the president and CEO of the Brattleboro Retreat, a psychiatric hospital and addiction treatment center in Brattleboro, Vt., which he lead through significant growth and transformation. He also served as CEO of Arbour Hospital in Boston; COO of Behavioral Healthcare and Sr. Vice President of Government Relations at the Sisters of Providence Health System; and Vice President of Behavioral Health and Cancer Services at Baystate Health System in Springfield, Mass. Simpson writes widely on health care reform, gun violence and the need for specialized programs for uniformed personnel experiencing post-traumatic stress. At the Smith College School for Social Work, he has taught Advanced Clinical Treatment; Men, Socialization and Gender Roles: Implications for Psychotherapy; and Group Theory & Practice.

Adjunct Instructor

Lecturer

Rhoda Smith is a doctoral candidate in Social Policy and Social Research at Loma Linda University as well as the Smith College School for Social Work’s 2016-2017 Bertha Capen Reynolds Predoctoral Fellow. Her research interests include mental and maternal health, and wellbeing for children in the child welfare system, especially foster youth. Before starting the Reynolds fellowship, she was a lecturer in Azusa Pacific University’s M.S.W. program and the coordinator for the University Consortium for Children and Families, a partnership between the LA County DCF and social work schools in Los Angeles. Smith’s career has included extensive experience in the field of child welfare, including work as a social worker and supervisor, recruiter of staff and foster parents, and consultant to group homes for pregnant and parenting teens in foster care.

Adjunct Instructor

After graduating from the Smith College School for Social Work M.S.W. program, Stefanie Speanburg went on to earn a doctorate in women’s, gender and sexuality studies at Emory University, focusing on women with borderline personality disorder. She has a private practice in Atlanta, Ga., working with individuals and couples, as well as therapists and other helping professionals, and teaches at Emory University. Speanburg has served as a research adviser for Smith master’s students since 2005, and has been part of the adjunct faculty since 2015, teaching Comparative Psychodynamic Theories for Social Work Practice and Introduction to Theories of Human Behavior.

Adjunct Professor

Ruth Spencer has been part of the adjunct faculty of the Smith College School for Social Work since 1997, teaching Family Law and Social Justice & the Law. She is currently the associate vice president for human resources at Vassar College, and was the director of human resources at Oberlin College before that. In addition to her work in human resources, Spencer spent many years working in social services and for mental health organizations. She was the director of human resources of the Cleveland Psychiatric Institute, director of social services of the Cuyahoga County Correctional Center, director of mental health at the J. Glen Smith Health Center in Cleveland, and has worked as a psychiatric social worker and as a parole officer.

Lecturer

Rachel Stein is a couples therapist and intake coordinator at the Northampton Center for Couples Therapy in Northampton, MA. She also writes and presents workshops on parenting and on maintaining relationships as parents, drawing on her training in postpartum mood disorders, as a certified Reflective Parenting Program group leader, and in Gottman Method Couples Therapy. Stein graduated from Smith College with a degree in psychology and went on to earn her M.S.W. at the University of Southern California. Before returning to Massachusetts, she worked at several social service agencies in California, and served as a bilingual expert witness in immigration cases.

Adjunct Professor

Rosemary Sullivan completed her doctorate at the Smith College School for Social work in 2009. She is an assistant professor of social work at Westfield State University, primarily teaching in the HBSE sequence and social policy classes. Sullivan’s research and teaching interests include identity development among trans people, mandated treatment of family violence offenders, integrating trauma theory into clinical practice, utilizing forensic evaluation techniques in cases of suspected child abuse, and social worker preparation for expert witness testimony in criminal and civil trials. Before completing her Ph.D. she worked in residential treatment programs with adolescent girls with severe emotional and behavioral problems, and worked as a group therapist for male batterers, and for women in substance abuse treatment programs. At the SSW, Sullivan has taught Developmental Deviations in Childhood and Adolescence, Crisis Intervention and Problems in Biopsychosocial Functioning, and has served as a thesis adviser.

Adjunct Professor

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Adjunct Associate Professor

Kurt White is the director of ambulatory services at the Brattleboro Retreat, a psychiatric hospital and addiction treatment center in Brattleboro, Vt., where he oversees all outpatient, intensive outpatient and partial hospitalization programs. White is also a therapist at the Brattleboro Retreat Anna Marsh Behavioral Health Care Clinic, seeing adults with mental health and/or addictive disorders. He is president of the Vermont Association of Addiction Professionals and presents widely on issues around substance abuse. An alum of the Smith College School for Social Work M.S.W. program, White has been part of the faculty since 2006 and teaches Group Psychotherapy Theory and Practice.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Mark Williams is an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. His research focuses on same-sex partnerships and the health of LGBT older adults, and he teaches course in social work practices, gerontology and multigenerational policies and services. Williams also holds a Master of Divinity and served as a United Methodist pastor in churches in the Seattle area, and worked as a grief support services specialist at Providence Hospice of Seattle.

Lecturer & Adjunct Instructor

Nichole Wofford is a Smith College School for Social Work doctoral candidate and has worked in the mental health field for more than 20 years, providing direct services and clinical supervision, as well as program management. Wofford currently works for the Sacramento City Unified School District, managing the Connect Center, the district’s centralized youth and family resource center. She is also a licensed marriage family therapist in private practice. Her specializations include depression, anxiety disorders, childhood trauma and abuse, effective communication skills, work stress and cultural issues (e.g. racial/ethnic discrimination, LGBT identity issues, divorce, blended-family issues, etc.). In addition to her practice, Wofford facilitates trainings and workshops in educational settings and to mental health professionals on working with African-American children and families, working clinically with LGBT clients and empowering LGBT students in a learning environment. In 2015, she was honored for her work, with Sacramento’s Harvey Milk Day Community Award. At the SSW, Wofford teaches Problems in Biopsychosocial Functioning.

Adjunct Professor

Kirk Woodring is the chief clinical officer at the Brattleboro Retreat, a psychiatric hospital and addiction treatment center in Brattleboro, Vt. He has presented and published widely on suicide and substance abuse, and is the co-author of Assessing the Risk: Suicide Assessment in the Hospital Environment of Care. Woodring earned his M.S.W. at the Smith College School for Social Work in 1995 and has been associated with the college as a clinical supervisor and adjunct faculty for 20 years. At Smith, Woodring teaches courses in group theory and advanced group practice, and coordinates the first year group theory and practice courses.

Lecturer

Amanda Wright is a social worker, instructor, attorney, and coach. After several years working in student outreach and support in the Dean of Students office at Boston College, she currently teaches courses on youth development, social work and social welfare at Springfield College. Wright is also the head coach of boy’s track and field at Littleton High School and recently coached cross country at Mount Holyoke College.

Lecturer

Jia Xue is a doctoral candidate in social welfare at the University of Pennsylvania School of Social Policy & Practice 
and a fellow with the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard University. She also holds a master’s degree in statistics from Penn and a law degree from Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. Xue’s scholarly interests include intimate violence, dating violence in young adulthood, child abuse, and gender-based violence in international and cross-cultural contexts. Her research focuses on how social media can advance research methodology, whether social media can be used to support healthy dating and sexual behaviors among vulnerable populations, and whether social media can serve as venues for efficacious intimate violence interventions.