Past Exhibits

lettuce growing in rows in a field
Tuesday, May 1, 2018 to Thursday, May 31, 2018

Physiology House, Lyman Conservatory

This exhibit, curated by June Ahn ’18, aims to explore the humble beginnings of what is now a ubiquitous salad green.
Although once weedy and quite bitter, the lettuce of today grows worldwide and in many different forms, including romaine, butterhead, stem, and curled. 
 June is a senior majoring in biology and minoring in landscape studies, with a focus in plants. She has worked at the Smith Botanic Garden since her sophomore year as an outdoor garden assistant, curatorial intern, and GIS liaison.

Poster announcing the Green Italian Class
Tuesday, May 1, 2018 to Thursday, May 31, 2018

Lyman Plant House

On exhibit are the final projects for Green Italian (ITL 235), an intermediate Italian conversation course taught by Bruno Grazioli and held at the Lyman Plant House. Through this class supported by the Botanic Garden’s Curricular Enhancement program, students acquire Italian vocabulary on botany and use these terms actively during class to describe plants, flowers, and the landscape. Other aims of the course are to help build students’ sense of the rich Italian biodiversity.

Students are presenting and explaining their creations at the last class meeting of the semester on Friday, May 4 at 10:00 am, Lyman Plant House. Presentations will be in Italian.

Tuesday, May 1, 2018 to Thursday, May 31, 2018

Physiology House, Lyman Conservatory

This year's advanced architectural design studios (Advanced Topics in Architecture, ARS386 and ARS388) taught by Elisa Kim explore alternative relationships between buildings, culture, and the environment.

In collaboration with the Botanic Garden and through a series of interrelated projects, each student began by choosing a plant of her choice, then designing and fabricating a miniature selfsustaining eco-unit intended to support the plant’s life.

Common hollyhock
Saturday, April 1, 2017 to Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Extended through January 2018!

Botanical illustrations created by Victoria I and Lillian Nicholson portray medicinal plants identified in the excavations of Pompeii. Come explore the varied ways both ancient Romans and modern Pompeians have used these plants.

Friday, November 3, 2017 to Monday, January 29, 2018

Ruth B. Wilson ’46 majored in English literature and took as much studio art as was then allowed. Her time spent in the Botanic Garden ignited a love of plants and flowers that continues to this day. Some twenty years after her time at Smith, Ruth Wilson Sutro began studying etching. For her, the etchings presented in this display bring back the memory of those afternoons at Smith when the greenhouses were a welcome source of entertainment and wonder.

Monday, May 1, 2017 to Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Commencement & Reunion Exhibition
A live display in the Physiology House of some of the plants that are featured in the gallery exhibition, Plants of Pompeii: Ancient and Modern Medicinal Plants. Come and immerse yourself in the scents and greenery of botanical Pompeii.

Monday, May 2, 2016 to Sunday, March 26, 2017

The Earth's diverse environments create many challenges for plant survival, and plants have evolved adaptations that allow them to thrive under hostile conditions. This exhibit explores these diverse adaptations, from clinging to rock cliffs to eating other plants.

Gardenia species flower
Sunday, May 1, 2016 to Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Scent is an integral part of communities from around the world, from incense used in prayer to fragrant flowers offered as a sign of love....

Alethopteris fossils
Thursday, December 3, 2015 to Sunday, April 3, 2016

Take a journey, back through time, to the beginnings of plant life on Earth with this display of plant fossils, plant reconstruction drawings, and informational panels relating to significant events in the Earth’s timeline.

Places for the Spirit
Friday, March 6, 2015 to Wednesday, September 30, 2015

For twenty years, photographer Vaughn Sills collected images of a gardening style that, despite its long history, is unknown to most horticulturists and is disappearing quickly.

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