Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 60
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 28
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Monday/Friday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Formal logic and informal logic. The study of abstract logic together with the construction and deconstruction of everyday arguments. Logical symbolism and operations, deduction and induction, consistency and inconsistency, paradoxes and puzzles. Examples drawn from law, philosophy, politics, literary criticism, computer science, history, commercials, mathematics, economics and the popular press.

Crosslist(s): LNG
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 24
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 1
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Wednesday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Formal logic and informal logic. The study of abstract logic together with the construction and deconstruction of everyday arguments. Logical symbolism and operations, deduction and induction, consistency and inconsistency, paradoxes and puzzles. Examples drawn from law, philosophy, politics, literary criticism, computer science, history, commercials, mathematics, economics and the popular press.

Crosslist(s): LNG
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 30
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 4
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Wednesday | 8:00 AM - 9:15 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

Formal logic and informal logic. The study of abstract logic together with the construction and deconstruction of everyday arguments. Logical symbolism and operations, deduction and induction, consistency and inconsistency, paradoxes and puzzles. Examples drawn from law, philosophy, politics, literary criticism, computer science, history, commercials, mathematics, economics and the popular press.

Crosslist(s): LNG
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 17
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Mathematics
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

A study of Western philosophy from the early Greeks to the end of the Middle Ages, with emphasis on the pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics and Epicureans, and some of the scholastic philosophers.

Crosslist(s): ANS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 20
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 16
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Writing Intensive
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Intensive practice in writing and discussing philosophy and in applying philosophical methods to key problems raised in essays written by members of the philosophy department. The spring semester course must be taken by the end of the student's sophomore year unless the department grants a deferral or the student declares the major itself during the spring of her sophomore year. Minors are encouraged but not required to take the class. Prerequisite: Two college courses in philosophy, one of which may be taken concurrently, or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 11
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Design is one of the most pervasive human activities. Its effects--intended or unintended--permeate our lives. Questions abound about the role of design and the significance of being able to exercise it and of being subject to it. For example: Are there particular pleasures, as well as special responsibilities, characteristic of designing? What is the nature of deprivation imposed upon people when they lack the opportunity or the knowledge to share in the design of their living or working conditions? How much control do designers actually have over the meaning and use of what they design?

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 12
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: PHI 236 or EDC 235
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Offered as PSY 213 and PHI 213. A detailed examination of how children learn their language. Theories of acquisition of word meaning, syntax and pragmatics are examined, as well as methodology for assessment of children’s knowledge. Cross-linguistic and cross-cultural data and perspectives are considered, as well as applications in language therapy and education. Students undertake an original research project using transcript analysis, and read original research literature. Background in linguistics or child development is necessary. Prerequisites: PHI 236 or EDC 235. Enrollment limited to 25.

Crosslist(s): LNG, PHI, PSY
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 7
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Time/Location: Monday/Friday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

The emergence and rapid development of networked information technologies has produced an enormous amount of data about us, from our consumer habits and financial histories to our health histories and social media identities. This class considers ethical questions in connection with the collection, use, and storage of data, considering empirical research in the natural sciences, social sciences and computer sciences against the backdrop of philosophical conceptions of consent, privacy, personal identity, and equality. Students will analyze ethical questions prompted by the generation of data, and social implications of data-driven governance, considering possible theoretical and policy guiding responses. (E)

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 33
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Social Science
Time/Location: Monday | 1:40 PM - 2:55 PM; Friday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

What does morality demand of us in the real world? How does ethical reflection inform our social, economic, and personal lives? Every informed citizen must ask these questions. We will address issues that arise in the context of environmental ethics (preserving species and places, genetically modified foods, global warming); animal rights (vegetarianism, vivisection, experimentation); biomedical ethics (abortion, euthanasia, reproductive technologies); business ethics (advertising, accounting, whistle-blowing, globalism); sexual ethics (harassment, coercion, homosexuality); social justice (war, affirmative action, poverty, criminal justice); and other such topics.

Crosslist(s): ENV
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 14
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

An examination of the works of some major moral theorists of the Western philosophical tradition and their implications for our understanding of the nature of the good life and the sources and scope of our moral responsibilities. Enrollment limited to 25.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 2
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

What is Ignorance? Is it simply lack of knowledge? What is its relation to illusion, deception, self-deception? What is the difference between being ignorant of something and ignoring it? Is ignorance something for which one can be held responsible? Something for which one can be punished? Something for which one can be rewarded? To what social and political ends has ignorance been put, and how?

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 9
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM Instructional Method: In-Person

This course is an introduction to central topics in the philosophy of language. What is the relation between thought, language and reality? What kinds of things do we do with words? Is there anything significant about the definite article "the"? How does meaning accrue to proper names? Is speaker meaning the same as the public, conventional (semantic) meaning of words? Is there a distinction between metaphorical and literal language? We explore some of the answers that philosophers like Frege, Russell, Strawson, Donnellan, Austin, Quine, Kripke and Davidson have offered to these and other related questions. Prerequisite: PHI 101, PHI 102 or equivalent.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 8
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Social Science
Time/Location: Monday | 1:40 PM - 4:20 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Humans have always sought to elevate the conditions of their existence. What differentiates enhancement’s strongest proponents, so-called transhumanists, from earlier thinkers like the ancient Greeks is their belief that crossing the divide from our plane of being to a higher one is possible, even inevitable, through humans’ technological ingenuity. Given their content and implications, scrutiny of transhumanists’ views is essential. Areas this colloquium addresses include transhumanists’ and their critics’ views of human nature; the implications of existing brain science for transhumanists’ more extravagant claims; their notions of knowledge, values and education; and transhumanists’ handling of risks, including those that are potentially grave. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 12
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 1
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Literature, Social Science
Time/Location: Wednesday | 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

What does it mean to be a cosmopolitan person -- a global citizen? Can one simultaneously construct one's identity in terms of one's nationality, gender, ethnicity and/or other more local forms of community and be truly cosmopolitan? If so, how? If not, which is the better approach? Is there one distinctive way of being cosmopolitan, or might there be varieties of cosmopolitanism arising in different cultural contexts, for instance, under colonial rule or conditions of exile? Is it self-evidently true that being a cosmopolitan person is a good thing, for an individual or a society? What are some of its challenges? We will read essays by Kant, Mill, Nussbaum, Rawls, Rorty, Naipaul, Said, Tagore, Gandhi, Appiah and others with a view to examining and assessing different answers that have been proposed to these and related questions. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Crosslist(s): SAS
2 cross listed courses found for the selected term.
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 12
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: PHI 236 or EDC 235
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Offered as PSY 213 and PHI 213. A detailed examination of how children learn their language. Theories of acquisition of word meaning, syntax and pragmatics are examined, as well as methodology for assessment of children’s knowledge. Cross-linguistic and cross-cultural data and perspectives are considered, as well as applications in language therapy and education. Students undertake an original research project using transcript analysis, and read original research literature. Background in linguistics or child development is necessary. Prerequisites: PHI 236 or EDC 235. Enrollment limited to 25.

Crosslist(s): LNG,PHI,PSY
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 12
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: PHI 236 or EDC 235
Curriculum Distribution: Natural Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM Instructional Method: In-Person

Offered as PSY 213 and PHI 213. A detailed examination of how children learn their language. Theories of acquisition of word meaning, syntax and pragmatics are examined, as well as methodology for assessment of children’s knowledge. Cross-linguistic and cross-cultural data and perspectives are considered, as well as applications in language therapy and education. Students undertake an original research project using transcript analysis, and read original research literature. Background in linguistics or child development is necessary. Prerequisites: PHI 236 or EDC 235. Enrollment limited to 25.

Crosslist(s): LNG,PHI,PSY