Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 60
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 49
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics, Writing Intensive
Time/Location: Monday/Friday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Wright Weinstein Instructional Method: In-Person

Formal logic and informal logic. The study of abstract logic together with the construction and deconstruction of everyday arguments. Logical symbolism and operations, deduction and induction, consistency and inconsistency, paradoxes and puzzles. Examples drawn from law, philosophy, politics, literary criticism, computer science, history, commercials, mathematics, economics and the popular press.

Crosslist(s): LNG
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 15
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Wednesday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Wright 238 Instructional Method: In-Person

Formal logic and informal logic. The study of abstract logic together with the construction and deconstruction of everyday arguments. Logical symbolism and operations, deduction and induction, consistency and inconsistency, paradoxes and puzzles. Examples drawn from law, philosophy, politics, literary criticism, computer science, history, commercials, mathematics, economics and the popular press.

Crosslist(s): LNG
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 14
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Wednesday | 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM / Hillyer L19 Instructional Method: In-Person

Formal logic and informal logic. The study of abstract logic together with the construction and deconstruction of everyday arguments. Logical symbolism and operations, deduction and induction, consistency and inconsistency, paradoxes and puzzles. Examples drawn from law, philosophy, politics, literary criticism, computer science, history, commercials, mathematics, economics and the popular press.

Crosslist(s): LNG
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 9
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Wednesday | 8:00 AM - 9:15 AM / Wright 238 Instructional Method: In-Person

Formal logic and informal logic. The study of abstract logic together with the construction and deconstruction of everyday arguments. Logical symbolism and operations, deduction and induction, consistency and inconsistency, paradoxes and puzzles. Examples drawn from law, philosophy, politics, literary criticism, computer science, history, commercials, mathematics, economics and the popular press.

Crosslist(s): LNG
Credits: 0 Max Enrollment: 15
Course Type: Discussion Section Enrollment: 11
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics
Time/Location: Wednesday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / Dewey 104 Instructional Method: In-Person

Formal logic and informal logic. The study of abstract logic together with the construction and deconstruction of everyday arguments. Logical symbolism and operations, deduction and induction, consistency and inconsistency, paradoxes and puzzles. Examples drawn from law, philosophy, politics, literary criticism, computer science, history, commercials, mathematics, economics and the popular press.

Crosslist(s): LNG
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 25
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Mathematics
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday/Friday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Seelye 306 Instructional Method: In-Person

A study of Western philosophy from the early Greeks to the end of the Middle Ages, with emphasis on the pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics and Epicureans, and some of the scholastic philosophers.

Crosslist(s): ANS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 40
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / McConnell 404 Instructional Method: In-Person

An introduction to the six classical schools of Indian philosophy. What are their views on the nature of self, mind and reality? What is knowledge and how is it acquired? What constitutes right action? We will read selections from the Upanishads, the Bhagavad-Gita, the Nyaya and Yoga Sutras, and the Samkhya-Karika, amongst others. At the end of the semester we will briefly consider the relation of these ancient traditions to the views of some influential modern Indian thinkers like Aurobindo, Vivekananda and Krishnamurti. Comparisons with positions in the western philosophical tradition will be an integral part of the course.

Crosslist(s): BUS, SAS
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 25
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 21
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Social Science
Time/Location: Monday/Friday | 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM / Bass 210 Instructional Method: In-Person

An examination of the works of some major moral theorists of the Western philosophical tradition and their implications for our understanding of the nature of the good life and the sources and scope of our moral responsibilities. Enrollment limited to 25.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 24
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM / Hatfield 105 Instructional Method: In-Person

Close examination of the different but converging ways in which moral, political and legal contexts shape the analysis of an issue. For example: questions about the status of a right to privacy; the history of disgust as a ground for laws governing human behavior.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 28
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics, Natural Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 7:00 PM - 8:20 PM / McConnell 103 Instructional Method: In-Person

Introduction to the issues and methods of modern linguistics, including morphology, syntax, semantics, phonology and pragmatics. The focus is on the revolution in linguistics introduced by Noam Chomsky, and the profound questions it raises for human nature, linguistic universals and language acquisition.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 999
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 15
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Social Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / Seelye 311 Instructional Method: In-Person

Friedrich Nietzsche was one of the most insightful and provocative, but also one of the least understood of philosophers. He has been variously characterized as anti-semitic, elitist, illiberal, a Nazi, an irrationalist, a nihilist--the list goes on. Some of these labels are justified; others are not. In this course we will read a number of primary works by Nietzsche and examine his views on important philosophical issues such as the status of metaphysics, the significance of reason, the relationship between meaning and truth, the value of art and science, and the justification of a system of absolute moral values.

Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 12
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 10
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: Yes
Enforced Requirements: JR/SR only
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday | 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM / Seelye 102 Instructional Method: In-Person

An examination of the conceptual and moral underpinnings of sustainability. Questions to be discussed include: What exactly is sustainability? What conceptions of the world (as resource, as machine, as something with functional integrity, etc.) does sustainability rely on, and are these conceptions justifiable? How is sustainability related to future people? What values are affirmed by sustainability, and how can we argue those are values that should be endorsed? How does sustainability compare with environmental objectives of longer standing such as conservation? Preference given to majors in either philosophy or environmental science and policy.


Permission Required/Registration by Waitlist. During Add/Drop, Waiver Required.

Crosslist(s): ENV
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 0
Course Type: Independent Study Section Enrollment: 1
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 0
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: Permission/Waiver Required
Instructional Method: In-Person

For senior majors, by arrangement with the department.

4 cross listed courses found for the selected term.
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 37
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 34
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 6
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Natural Science, Social Science
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / McConnell 404 Instructional Method: In-Person

We have entered a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, characterized by the accelerating impact of human activities on the Earth’s ecosystems. All over the globe, humans have transformed the environment and have sometimes created catastrophic dynamics within social-ecological systems. Scientists have studied these phenomena for decades, alerting both the general public and policy-makers of the consequences of our actions. However, despite convincing evidence of environmental degradation, humans continue to radically transform their environment. This course explores this puzzle and asks how we can remodel our social-ecological systems to build a more sustainable and resilient future.

Crosslist(s): LSS,PHI
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 37
Course Type: Lecture Section Enrollment: 37
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 3
Reserved Seats: Yes
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Natural Science, Social Science
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / Ainsworth S150 Instructional Method: In-Person

We have entered a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, characterized by the accelerating impact of human activities on the Earth’s ecosystems. All over the globe, humans have transformed the environment and have sometimes created catastrophic dynamics within social-ecological systems. Scientists have studied these phenomena for decades, alerting both the general public and policy-makers of the consequences of our actions. However, despite convincing evidence of environmental degradation, humans continue to radically transform their environment. This course explores this puzzle and asks how we can remodel our social-ecological systems to build a more sustainable and resilient future.

Crosslist(s): LSS,PHI
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 16
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 6
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: FY only
Curriculum Distribution: Mathematics, Social Science, Writing Intensive
Time/Location: Tuesday/Thursday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / Hatfield 104 Instructional Method: In-Person

Closely examining texts from a variety of philosophical perspectives, we will explore some of the ethical, social and political issues raised by humor and laughter. Humor can be a forceful instrument, often deployed by the powerful in their attempts to control the powerless and by the powerless to topple the powerful. Humor tends to operate in such a way as to include some and exclude others. Its effects, intended or unintended, can be benign or hurtful. Enrollment limited to 16 first-years. (E)
 

Crosslist(s): PHI
Credits: 4 Max Enrollment: 16
Course Type: Seminar Section Enrollment: 14
Grade Mode: Graded Waitlist Count: 11
Reserved Seats: No
Enforced Requirements: FY only
Curriculum Distribution: Historical Studies, Writing Intensive
Time/Location: Monday/Wednesday | 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM / Hatfield 107 Instructional Method: In-Person

The term “existentialism” refers to a nexus of twentieth-century philosophical and literary explorations focused on themes including human freedom, responsibility, temporality, ambiguity, and mortality. Existentialists Simone de Beauvoir, Albert Camus, Martin Heidegger, and Jean-Paul Sartre oppose a longstanding philosophical view that human beings flourish by understanding themselves and the cosmos in rational terms. In addition to exploring assigned readings in depth, the seminar addresses broader questions: “Are there insights involving existentialist themes that literary works are in a distinctive position to convey?” “Is there an existentialist ethics?” and “Do existentialists’ realizations about living well continue to have resonance today?” Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students.

Crosslist(s): PHI