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The Majors

Engineering student working in the lab

 

The Bachelor of Science in Engineering Science

The Picker Engineering Program’s bachelor of science in engineering science is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET. The program in engineering science is offered for those students who plan to practice professionally as engineers. The ABET-accredited program is rooted in
 the fundamental engineering principles that underpin all engineering disciplines. After completing a foundational set of core courses, students choose from a variety of electives to pursue an area of technical interest. An integrated curriculum of liberal arts, science, math and engineering courses provides the breadth and depth needed to think critically, act reflectively and make informed decisions. Read about what Smith engineering graduates are doing.

The Picker Engineering Program has adopted the seven student learning outcomes suggested by ABET. For each learning outcome, the engineering faculty have identified specific performance indicators that can be measured—there are two to four performance indicators for each learning outcome. The learning outcomes are as follows.

  • An ability to identify, formulate and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science and mathematics.
  • An ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental and economic factors.
  • An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences.
  • An ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental and societal contexts.
  • An ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks and meet objectives.
  • An ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions.
  • An ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies.

 

The engineering program requires formal records of any deviation from the approved Smith courses. Any time that a student takes a course away from the college for credit, it requires approval from both engineering and the college to be accepted for the major. Additionally, course substitutions on campus require approval from the engineering program in order for these credits to be applied to the major. Students should consult their academic adviser for any guidance needed.

Book of Evidence Requirement

Bachelor of science in engineering science majors must satisfy the major’s book of evidence requirement by completing a book of evidence with a minimum of 20 approved artifacts. These artifacts serve as evidence of the 20 performance indicators linked to the program’s ABET student outcomes that are mapped to the curriculum.

Engineering Introductory Courses

  • EGR 100 Engineering for Everyone
  • EGR 110 Fundamental Engineering Principles

Engineering Core Courses

  • EGR 220 Engineering Circuit Theory
  • EGR 270 Engineering Mechanics
  • EGR 290 Engineering Thermodynamics
  • EGR 374 Fluid Mechanics

Capstone Design

Capstone Design Project with Faculty or Industry

In senior year, every student is required to participate in a yearlong capstone design project that draws on fundamental engineering course work, as well as broad-based societal considerations relevant to the particular project.

Students may satisfy the capstone design requirement through a design-based project with an individual member of the faculty (EGR 421D), or through a team-based industry or nonprofit-sponsored project (EGR 422D). Each project is two semesters, 6 credits, and has an honors equivalent. Regular design meetings, progress reports, interim and final reports, and presentations are required.

Regardless of which capstone design option a student elects to take, she must also complete the two-semester, 2-credit Engineering Design and Professional Practice course (below) that addresses the engineering design process and associated professional skills required for careers in engineering.

Engineering Design and Professional Practice

EGR 410D Engineering Design and Professional Practice is a two-semester course that focuses on the engineering design process and associated professional skills required for careers in engineering. Topics include the engineering design process, project definition, design requirements, project management, concept generation, concept selection, engineering economics, design for sustainability, design for safety and risk reduction, design case studies, teamwork, effective presentations, professional ethics, networking, negotiation and intellectual property.

Engineering Technical Depth Courses

In consultation with their adviser, students choose five additional EGR courses to develop technical depth in an area of interest. At least four out of the five courses must be at the 300-level or higher.

*Special studies and honors credits can only be counted toward this category by petitioning the department.

Interdepartmental Courses

Math

8 credits from:
  • MTH 111 Calculus I
  • MTH 112 Calculus II
  • MTH 211 Linear Algebra
  • MTH 222 Differential Equations
  • MTH 212 Calculus III (a prerequisite to PHY 210)
  • MTH 220 Introduction to Probability and Statistics

Physics

  • PHY 117 Introductory Physics I or PHY 119 Advanced Introductory Physics
  • PHY 210 Mathematical Methods of Physical Sciences and Engineering

Chemistry

  • CHM 111 Chemistry I: General Chemistry

Lab-based Science

Five credits from:
  • PHY 118 Introductory Physics IIPHY 119 Advanced Introductory Physics
    • Engineering science majors with PHY 119 credit are not eligible to take PHY 118.
  • PHY 119 Advanced Introductory Physics
    • PHY 119 can fulfill the introductory physics requirement or the 5 credit lab based science course requirement but not both.
  • CHM 118 Advanced General Chemistry
  • CHM 222 Chemistry II: Organic Chemistry
  • BIO 132 (and 133) Cells, Physiology, and Development (and lab)
  • BIO 130 (and 131) Biodiversity, Ecology and Conversation (and lab)

Computer Science

  • CSC 111 Introduction to Computer Science Through Programming

Liberal Arts Breadth

Students are required to demonstrate breadth in their curriculum by completing one of the following:

  • Fulfilling the Latin Honors distribution requirements
  • Fulfilling the requirements for another major or minor within Division I (humanities) or Division II (social sciences and history)
  • Submitting a cogent proposal describing an alternative approach including all courses the student will take to acquire curricular breadth, for consideration and approval by the engineering faculty

 

    Engineering Curriculum Info Graphic
     

    The intention of the engineering curriculum is to build fundamental knowledge throughout the course of study and to give each student flexibility in course choices.

    Design

    EGR 100 and Senior Capstone

    EGR 100 and the Senior Capstone are required, design-based courses with significant hands-on learning components.These courses anchor the study of design within the curriculum at the beginner level (EGR 100) and the advanced level (capstone); additional design is found within other courses as well.

    EGR 100 and the senior capstone are also based on exploration and independent inquiry and as such are considered a part of the laboratory/studio sequence.

    Core Engineering Fundamentals

    Core courses required for all students

    The foundational engineering core courses for the degree must be taken by all students and include: 110 Fundamental Engineering Principles; 220 Engineering Circuit Theory; 270 Engineering Mechanics; 290 Engineering Thermodynamics; and 374 Fluid Mechanics.

    Technical Depth

    Five upper-level engineering electives

    The process here is to have each student thoughtfully consider her interests and career aspirations.

    Students are required to demonstrate reasonable technical depth by developing a sequence of five thematically related engineering technical depth courses, four of which must be at the 300 level.

    There must be a clear educational intention behind the selection of technical depth courses, and these courses should be selected in consultation with the student’s adviser.

    The plan of study identifies the course work needed to complete the major and allows each student to document a path toward completing the major.

    Students review, update and discuss their plan of study with their adviser each semester.

    See Forms for all plan of study forms.

    The Picker Engineering Program’s bachelor of science in engineering science is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET.

    The Picker Engineering Program educational objectives and program outcomes have been developed with input from the faculty and advisory boards and are consistent with ABET Criterion 2 and 3. Its assessment processes have been established to ensure that our graduates achieve the program objectives and outcomes and to develop and improve the engineering science program.

    Program Educational Objectives

    Within a few years of graduation, we expect Smith engineering science graduates will: 

    1. incorporate their knowledge and understanding of the natural sciences, humanities and social sciences in the application of their engineering education
    2. apply their engineering education in service to humanity
    3. enter the engineering profession or graduate school if they choose one of those pathways
    4. consider the impact of their professional actions on society
    5. demonstrate leadership in their personal and professional endeavors
    6. have advanced their professional development by acquiring new skills and knowledge

    Student Outcomes

    According to the defined outcomes and performance criterion, graduates of the program will have demonstrated the following attributes:

    1. an ability to identify, formulate and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science and mathematics
    2. an ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental and economic factors
    3. an ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences
    4. an ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental and societal contexts
    5. an ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks and meet objectives
    6. an ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions
    7. an ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies

    Annual Student Enrollment and Graduation Data

    Bachelor of Science in Engineering Science

    Academic Year

    # Juniors

    # Seniors

    # Graduates

    2003-2004 27 20 19
    2004-2005 32 26 27
    2005-2006 27 33 33
    2006-2007 15 25 25
    2007-2008 20 14 13
    2008-2009 21 20 20
    2009-2010 13 22 22
    2010-2011 18 13 13
    2011-2012 30 18 18
    2012-2013 30 30 30
    2013-2014 22 30 29
    2014-2015 34 16 16
    2015-2016 33 29 29
    2016-2017 41 30 30
    2017-2018 38 38 38
    2018-2019 39 35 May 2019
    2019-2020 __ __ May 2020
    Smith Students declare their majors no later than the registration period during the second semester of the sophomore year.

    All B.S. in engineering science students are encouraged to take the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam during their senior year.

    The FE is a standardized exam and is the first step you must take if you wish to gain professional licensure in engineering. The deadline to register will be announced to seniors each year.

    The Picker Engineering Program’s B.S. in engineering science is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET. The assessment and documentation of student outcomes and their corresponding performance indicators are critical components of a thorough ABET accreditation process.

    Starting in the spring of 2014, the Picker Engineering Program redesigned its methodology for the collection and assessment of evidence related to ABET criterion 3—student outcomes and their corresponding performance indicators. Specifically, the program moved to a book of evidence, with the goal of making the assessment process more transparent and student centered.

    The student outcomes and corresponding performance indicators are mapped to all of our engineering courses.

    Starting with the class of 2015, B.S. engineering science majors will be issued a notebook referred to as their book of evidence. The notebook will be owned by the Picker Engineering Program and will be housed within its administrative space. Students will build their book of evidence by identifying meaningful work they have done that meets the individual performance indicators developed by the engineering faculty to assess the program’s ABET student outcomes. For the class of 2019 and later, completing the book of evidence with a minimum of 20 approved artifacts (one for each performance indicator) is a requirement for the B.S. in engineering science major. Some details include:

    • Much or all of the evidence will likely come through engineering courses, but any evidence accrued during the undergraduate time is admissible.
    • The required artifacts must be graded work. B.S. students are welcome to submit additional artifacts. 
    • For work done within a Smith College engineering course, students will be guided by that course’s faculty member on the details of submitting the work through the course and having that faculty member sign off on it as meeting a particular performance indicator. Once an engineering faculty member signs off, a copy of the work with the signature should be placed in the student’s book of evidence. 
    • A performance vector classification is integrated into the evaluation of BOE artifacts. Performance vector information will enhance the assessment of BOEs and support evaluation of the extent to which student outcomes are being attained. An artifact from another Smith department must have the grade on it and will be evaluated by the Picker Engineering ABET Committee. An artifact from an internship or similar experience must come with a signature from the supervisor and will subsequently be evaluated by an engineering faculty member. An artifact from a study abroad/away course is required to have a grade from the abroad/away faculty on it and will be evaluated by the academic ddviser who approved the course.
    • Progress on a B.S. major’s BOE is connected to EGR 410D. B.S. majors are required to have a minimum of 16 faculty-signed artifacts in their BOE by the last day of finals for the fall semester. B.S. majors are required to have a minimum of 20 faculty-signed artifacts in their BOE by the last day of classes in the spring semester.

    Students with questions about the process may contact Martin Green, assistant director of the Picker Engineering Program.


    The Bachelor of Arts in Engineering Arts

    The bachelor of arts is for those students who recognize the increasing importance of science, technology and design in today’s world and do not intend to practice as engineers. The A.B. is not accredited by ABET. Similar to other liberal arts majors at Smith, the A.B. in engineering arts requires 13 courses to complete the major and 64 credits outside of the major. This flexibility allows a student to experience the full richness of the curriculum.

    The bachelor of arts in engineering arts is offered for those students who recognize the increasing importance of science and technology in today’s world, who want to better understand the engineer’s role in service to humanity and who do not intend to pursue professional practice as engineers. The bachelor of science in engineering science is the only ABET-accredited degree.

    The possibilities of coupling the bachelor of arts in engineering arts with other disciplines are boundless. The bachelor of arts coupled with a focused set of studies in the liberal arts is a particularly well-suited course of study for preparing students to address the complexities of the world in which we live.

    Requirements for the Major

    The major requires a total of 13 courses (or the equivalent)*:

    Engineering Introductory Courses

    • EGR 100 Engineering for Everyone
    • EGR 110 Fundamental Engineering Principles

    Engineering Core Courses

    • EGR 220 Engineering Circuit Theory
    • EGR 270 Engineering Mechanics
    • EGR 290 Engineering Thermodynamics

    Engineering Technical Depth Courses

    • Two 300-level (or higher) engineering courses

    Interdepartmental Courses

    Math

    • MTH 111 Calculus I
    • MTH 112 Calculus II
    • MTH 212 Calculus III (a prerequisite to PHY 210)
    • PHY 210 Mathematical Methods of Physical Sciences and Engineering

    Science

    • PHY 117 Introductory Physics I
    • CHM 111 Chemistry I: General Chemistry

    *Course substitutions require approval of the student’s adviser and assistant director or director of the engineering department.

    Liberal Arts Breadth

    As with all A.B. degrees at Smith, the engineering arts degree requires 64 credits outside of the major.

    The nonaccredited bachelor of arts in engineering arts is offered for those women who do not intend to practice as engineers but who recognize the increasing importance of science and technology in today's world.

    The program, coupled with a focused set of studies in the liberal arts, and which leads to a possible major or minor in the humanities, arts or sciences, is a well-suited course of study for preparing students to address the complexities of the world in which we live and work in technology-related fields.

    The plan of study identifies the course work needed to complete the major and allows each student to document her path toward completing the major.

    Students review, update and discuss their plan of study with their adviser each semester.

    See Forms for all plan of study forms.

    Student Engineering Organizations