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You may search for courses meeting the criteria offered below. If a search results in too many courses, add criteria or select a more narrow category. If you searched only by department and term, cross-listed courses will be displayed at the bottom of the list.

    COURSE CATALOG SEARCH RESULTS

    8 courses found for the selected term.
    Click on a course title for more information.
    Click on a department code to view complete departmental listings.
    If you searched only by department and term, cross-listed courses will be displayed at the bottom of the list.


  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 9
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 2:45 PM-4:00 PM / SEELYE 105

    A central feature of religious traditions and lived religious experience, ritual is often thought of as repetitive, unchanging, and prescriptive. Yet, enacted rituals are often open-ended and allow considerable room for creativity and innovation. Through embodied action and symbolic drama, rituals serve complex functions of making meaning, deepening spirituality, performing cultural identity, and advocating for social change. In this course, students will study various theories of ritual and examine ritual practices (religious and secular) in diverse traditions and societies. For their final project, students will themselves participate in the process of ritualizing--that is, crafting new rituals. 
    Linked Course: No
    JUD Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 35
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 36
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 10:50 AM-12:05 PM / SEELYE 211

    How do the world’s religions picture the journey beyond death? This course examines conceptions of heaven, hell and purgatory; immortality, rebirth and resurrection; the judgement of the dead and the life of the world to come. Readings include classic and sacred texts such as The Epic of Gilgamesh, Plato’s Phaedo, the Katha Upanishad, The Tibetan Book of the Dead, Dante’s Divine Comedy and Newman’s Dream of Gerontius, and a variety of philosophical and theological reflections on the meaning of death and the hope for eternal life. Enrollment limited to 35. 
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 17
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 10:50 AM-12:05 PM / SEELYE 204

    This course focuses on the lives of women in ancient Israelite society through close readings of the Hebrew Bible. We look at detailed portraits of female characters as well as the role of many unnamed women in the text to consider the range and logic of biblical attitudes toward women, including reverence, disgust and sympathy. We also consider female deities in the ancient Near East, women in biblical law, sex in prophetic and Wisdom literature, and the female body as a source of metaphor.  
    Linked Course: No
    ANS Crosslist, ARC Crosslist, JUD Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 12
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 9:25 AM-10:40 AM / SEELYE 107

    The rise of Jewish philosophy and mysticism (Kabbalah) in the Islamic world and in medieval Spain, and the development of these theological and intellectual trends as decisive influences upon all subsequent forms of Judaism. Analysis of Jewish philosophy and mysticism as complementary yet often competing spiritual paths. How did Jewish philosophers and mystics consider the roles of reason, emotion and symbols in religious faith and practice? What interrelations did they see between the natural and divine realms, and between religious, philosophical and scientific explanations? Expressions of philosophy and mysticism in religious texts, individual piety, popular practice and communal politics. Readings drawn from the works of the great philosopher Maimonides, the mystical classic the Zohar and other thinkers, as well as personal documents of religious experience and thought. All readings in English. 
    Linked Course: No
    JUD Crosslist, MED Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 10
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: T Th 2:45 PM-4:00 PM / SEELYE 310

    Faith and reason, worship and the intellectual life, the meaning of redemption and the nature of Catholicism according to major thinkers in the Catholic tradition. Readings from Augustine, Anselm, Aquinas, Pascal, John Henry Newman, G.K. Chesterton, Simone Weil, Hans Urs von Balthasar, Karol Wojtyla (Pope John Paul II), Elizabeth Anscombe, Alasdair MacIntyre and others. 
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 14
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 2:45 PM-4:00 PM / SEELYE 304

    This course is an introduction to the literature, thought and practice of religious traditions in India, from ancient times to the medieval period. Readings include materials from the Vedas, Upanishads and epics, from plays and poetry, as well as Buddhist and Jain literature. Particular consideration is given to the themes of dharma, karma, love and liberation as they are articulated in Classical Hinduism. 
    Linked Course: No
    BUS Crosslist, SAS Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 20
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: M W 1:20 PM-2:35 PM / WRIGHT 238

    Mormonism has gone from a religion of a few families to a global family of small sects and large denominations. This course explores the diversity of contemporary and historical Mormonisms. Topics for discussion include the creation of new scriptures; conflict between church and state; the dynamics of religious schism; temple spaces and the politics of secrecy; constructions of race, gender, and sexuality; missions and evangelism; modern pilgrimage; and the globalization of modern Mormonisms. In addition, students will conduct oral histories with women from around the world who have been ordained within a progressive Mormon church. Enrollment limited to 18. (E) 
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 8
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: W 7:00 PM-9:30 PM / SEELYE 204

    How do religious traditions justify acts of violence? And when and why do they embrace nonviolence? And what happens when these choices lead to revolution? This course considers the logic and practice of violence and non-violence in a variety of religious traditions around the world, as well as the ethical, social, and political consequences of these phenomena. Topics include suicide bombing and self-immolating, Gandhi’s ahimsa and Martin Luther King’s agape, spiritual ecology and ecoterrorism, and much more. {H}{L}{S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    BUS Crosslist
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The data in the course catalog are refreshed daily. Information concerning current and future course offerings is posted as it becomes available and is subject to change.

Smith College reserves the right to make changes to all announcements in the online Smith College Catalog Database, including changes in its course offerings, instructors, requirements for the majors and minors, and degree requirements. Course information contained herein is compiled and updated at regularly scheduled intervals by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty from data submitted by departments and programs. All data listed are as officially and formally approved by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty, the Committee on Academic Priorities and the faculty-at-large.