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A Culture of Care

Read Smith’s plans for the spring 2021 semester.
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Course Search

You may search for courses meeting the criteria offered below. If a search results in too many courses, add criteria or select a more narrow category. If you searched only by department and term, cross-listed courses will be displayed at the bottom of the list.

    COURSE CATALOG SEARCH RESULTS

    622 courses found for the selected term.
    Click on a course title for more information.
    Click on a department code to view complete departmental listings.
    If you searched only by department and term, cross-listed courses will be displayed at the bottom of the list.


  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 24
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 7:05 PM-8:20 PM / REMOTE

    An introduction to some of the major perspectives, themes, and issues in the field of Afro-American studies. Our focus is on the economic, social and political aspects of cultural production, and how these inform what it means to read, write about, view and listen to Black culture. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    LAS Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    Topics course. 

    Why has the construction of archives that center on the experiences of people of African descent been so critical to black political, cultural, and social life? What do black archives look like and what do they offer us? How do they expand the way we consider archives in general? This course seeks to address these questions by examining the conception and development of black archives, primarily, although not exclusively, as they arose in the United States across the twentieth century. Enrollment limited to 20. {H}
    Linked Course: No
    HST Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 12
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    What do Americans want? What do they fear? What is an “American”? How do we draw the line between those who belong and those who do not? How do we define citizenship, its rights and responsibilities? How do race, gender, class and other differences affect the drawing of these boundaries, and the contents of consciousness? This course introduces some of the exciting and innovative approaches to cultural analysis that have emerged over the last three decades. Students apply these methods to a variety of texts and practices (stories, movies, television shows, music, advertisements, clothes, buildings, laws, markets, bodies) in an effort to acquire the tools to become skillful readers of American culture, and to become more critical and aware as scholars and citizens. Prerequisite: AMS 201 is recommended but not required {A}{H}
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 23
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This course offers an analytical history of American popular culture since 1865. We start from the premise that popular culture, far from being merely a frivolous or debased alternative to high culture, is an important site of popular expression, social instruction and cultural conflict. We examine theoretical texts that help us to “read” popular culture, even as we study specific artifacts from a variety of pop culture sources, from television shows to Hollywood movies, the pornography industry to spectator sports, and popular music to theme parks. We pay special attention to questions of desire, and to the ways popular culture has mediated and produced pleasure, disgust, fear and satisfaction. Alternating lecture/discussion format. Enrollment limited to 25. {H}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    FMS Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 10
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Topics course. 

    According to a growing number of social theorists, and pretty much everybody else, we are living in an age of crisis. One of the critical tasks of our time is to develop interdisciplinary tools to analyze how environmental conditions, economic systems, technological developments, and political ideologies have sent us on a path of catastrophes: climate change, resource exhaustion, inequality, social fragmentation, and political repression. We examine how these conditions have shaped American culture (asking why news broadcasts, the entertainment industry, and social media respond to crises with distraction, disinformation, fear-mongering, and scapegoating), and explore efforts of artists and activists to theorize and devise creative and just alternatives in visual arts, fiction, essays, comedy, movies and music. {H}{S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to AMS majors AND Limited to juniors and seniors
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 4
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Writing Sample RequiredReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Topics course. Same as ENG 384. A writing sample and permission of the instructor are required. Enrollment limited to 12. 

    This is a workshop class where students will learn the art of journalism and compose stories that take on questions of gender, feminism, sexuality and power, while simultaneously exploring how the media represents gender and learning the history of women in journalism. No profession has been as important to feminists in challenging oppression than journalism--even as journalism has been historically resistant to a feminist vision. Students will master the fundaments of great reporting and writing—interviewing, structure, voice, style, and ethics—while crafting their own magazine-style stories about people grappling with real-life situations. {A}{L}{S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    ENG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 20
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This course explores the similarities and differences in the cultural patterning of human experience, compares economic, political, religious and family structures in Africa, the Americas, Asia and Oceania and analyzes the impact of the modern world on traditional societies. Several ethnographic films are viewed in coordination with descriptive case studies. Limited to first-year students and sophomores. Enrollment limited to 25. {S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years and sophomores
    ENV Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 22
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    This course explores the similarities and differences in the cultural patterning of human experience, compares economic, political, religious and family structures in Africa, the Americas, Asia and Oceania and analyzes the impact of the modern world on traditional societies. Several ethnographic films are viewed in coordination with descriptive case studies. Limited to first-year students and sophomores. Enrollment limited to 25. {S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years and sophomores
    ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 14
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Same as ARC 135. This course studies past cultures and societies through their material remains and explores how archaeologists use different field methods, analytical technique and theoretical approaches to investigate, reconstruct and learn from the past. Data from settlement surveys, site excavations and artifact analysis are used to address economic, social, political and ideological questions across time and space. This course is taught from an anthropological perspective, exploring key transitions in human prehistory, including the origins of food production, social inequality and state-level societies across the globe. Relevance of archaeological practice in modern political, economic and social contexts is explored. Limited to first-year students and sophomores. Enrollment limited to 30. {N}{S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years and sophomores
    ARC Crosslist, HSC Crosslist, MUX Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 6
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    This course introduces students to the variety of methods of inquiry used for research in anthropology. Throughout the semester, students are introduced to methods of locating and analyzing information and sources, developing research questions and writing. Normally taken in the spring of the sophomore or junior year. Prerequisite: 130 and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20 anthropology majors. {S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to ANT majors
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 18
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:10 AM / REMOTE

    Same as ENV 224. Anthropology seeks to understand human life in all its complexity, but what constitutes “the human” is far from straightforward. This course examines the changing ways that “Anthropos” is being understood in an era of rapid global climate change and our planet’s sixth mass extinction event, both driven by human activities. We review perspectives on the relationship between humans and their environment from various cultural perspectives, considering how they engage notions of race, class, and gender, and what they imply for nature conservation. Topics include modernity, pets, cyborgs, kinship, symbiosis, extinction, species invasions, settler colonialism, and the Anthropocene concept. Enrollment limit of 30. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    ENV Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This course explores (1) how and why humans across the globe began to domesticate plant and animal resources approximately 10,000 years ago, and (2) new directions in the archaeology of food across time and space. The first part of the semester focuses on the types of archaeological data and analytical methods used to understand the “agricultural revolution.” Case studies from both centers and noncenters of domestication are used to investigate the biological, economic and social implications of changing foodways. During the remainder of the semester, emphasis is placed on exploring a number of food-related topics within archaeology, such as the relationship between agriculture and sedentism, food and gender, the politics of feasting, and methods for integrating archaeological and ethnographic approaches to the study of food across the globe. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    LAS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 28
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    What can anthropologists teach us about religion as a social phenomenon? This course traces significant anthropological approaches to the study of religion, asking what these approaches contribute to our understanding of religion in the contemporary world. Topics include religious experience and rationality; myth, ritual and magic; rites of passage; function and meaning; power and alienation; religion and politics. Readings are drawn from important texts in the history of anthropology and from contemporary ethnographies of religion. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    BUS Crosslist, REL Crosslist, SAS Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    Topics course. 

    Disability is both a universal human reality and a profoundly embodied, contested, and situated experience. This course explores this tension from a range of methodological and theoretical perspectives, with an emphasis on innovative ethnographic work. Our approach will be insistently transnational and intersectional, taking into account how disabled selves and communities are shaped by geographical and historical context, racial and ethnic identity, class background, gender, and sexuality. We will consider concepts and themes such as embodiment, citizenship and belonging, access and visibility, creativity, medicalization and diagnosis, politics and advocacy, and virtuality and technology. {S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 11
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Same as ANT 135. This course studies past cultures and societies through their material remains. Explores how archaeologists use different field methods, analytical techniques and theoretical approaches to investigate, reconstruct and learn from the past. Data from settlement surveys, site excavations and artifact analysis are used to address economic, social, political and ideological questions across time and space. This course is taught from an anthropological perspective, exploring key transitions in human prehistory, including the origins of food production, social inequality and state-level societies across the globe. Relevance of archaeological practice in modern political, economic and social contexts is explored. Limited to first-year students and sophomores. Enrollment limited to 30. {N}{S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years and sophomores
    ANT Crosslist, HSC Crosslist, MUX Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 26
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This course explores how art and architecture have profoundly shaped visual experiences and shifting understandings of the past and present. Featuring different case studies, each section includes work with original objects, site visits and writings about art. Unifying themes include: (1) materials, techniques and the patterns deployed to create space; (2) the design, function and symbolism of images and monuments; (3) artistic production and its relation to individual and institutional patronage, religion, politics and aesthetics; (4) issues turning on artists’ fame versus anonymity and uniqueness versus reproducibility; and (5) cross-cultural exchanges. Enrollment limited to 25. {A}{H}
    Linked Course: No
    MUX Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 29
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    This course explores how art and architecture have profoundly shaped visual experiences and shifting understandings of the past and present. Featuring different case studies, each section includes work with original objects, site visits and writings about art. Unifying themes include: (1) materials, techniques and the patterns deployed to create space; (2) the design, function and symbolism of images and monuments; (3) artistic production and its relation to individual and institutional patronage, religion, politics and aesthetics; (4) issues turning on artists’ fame versus anonymity and uniqueness versus reproducibility; and (5) cross-cultural exchanges. Enrollment limited to 25. {A}{H}
    Linked Course: No
    MUX Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 11
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    Same as POR 201. This course serves as an introduction in English to contemporary and modern Brazilian art. Course materials and class discussions address such topics as public vs. private art spaces, national vs. global identities, the role of art as agency for social change and as site of memory, activism, resistance and transformation. Taught in English. Group B {A}
    Linked Course: No
    SPP Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 40
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This course explores many different aspects of life in the cities and sanctuaries of the ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece, Etruria and Rome. Recurrent themes include urbanism, landscapes and patterns of worship, including initiation, sacrifice and pilgrimage. We probe how modern notions of the secular and the sacred influence interpretation and how sometimes the seemingly most anomalous features of the worship of Isis or of the juxtaposition of commercial and domestic space within a city can potentially prove to be the most revealing about life in another place and time. Group A, Counts for ARU {A}{H}
    Linked Course: No
    ANS Crosslist, ARC Crosslist, URS Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 24
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Same as CLS 217. This course is a contextual examination of the art and architecture of Ancient Greece, from the end of the Bronze Age through the domination of Greece by Rome (ca. 1100-168 BCE) and handles an array of settlements, cemeteries, and ritual sites. It tracks the development of the Greek city-state and the increasing power of the Greeks in the Mediterranean, culminating in the major diaspora of Greek culture accompanying the campaigns of Alexander the Great and his followers. The course takes a broadly chronological approach, and the question of a unified Greek culture is stressed. Continuing archaeological work is considered.  {A}{H}
    Linked Course: No
    ARC Crosslist, CLS Crosslist, MUX Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 35
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    This course introduces the history of photography, emphasizing the ways photographs represent, mediate, construct, and communicate histories of race, gender, sex, sexuality, intimacy, and desire. We will study a variety of photographic images, from the dageurreotype to digital media, from ne arts photography to vernacular images. We will consider objects that have forged connections among loved ones, substantiated memories, or served as evidence, considering critical questions about photography’s relationship to identity, affect, knowledge production, and power. The course focuses on race and gender, and also attends closely to photography’s relationship to identity broadly speaking, including class, ability, and religion. Group B {A}{H}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 14
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    Topics course. Students may take up to four semesters of ARH 280 Art Historical Studies, as long as the topics are different. 

    From College Hall to Hogwarts and Romantic ruins to video games, Gothic visual culture has provided a vast reservoir of materials for post-medieval cultural productions, both historicizing and deliberately anachronistic. Salient moments in the reception of medieval art and architecture will be examined to understand how they have served differing cultural and political agendas from the 18th century onward. Topics include: Gothic Revival architecture; Troubadour and Pre-Raphaelite paintings; American Gothic; the Anarchist cathedral; the Middle Ages in film and fashion. Counts for ARU. Group A/B. {A}{H}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 25
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    This course examines global artistic tendencies since 1945 in their art-historical and socio-historical contexts. The class considers such developments as American abstraction and the rise of New York, neo-dada, pop, minimalism, conceptual art, earthworks, the influence of feminism, postmodernism, the politics of identity, conceptions of the site and the institution, global publics and the global culture of art and the theoretical issues and debates that help to frame these topics. Group B {A}{H}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 23
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    This course examines intersections of art and medicine from the late 18th century to the present. Considering a variety of texts and objects, from wax medical models and public health posters to Mona Hatoum’s cell-like sculptures and photographic coverage of the 2014 Ebola epidemic, we will disentangle how medical understandings of the body filter into artistic production and popular thought and vice versa. While course material is primarily from Europe and the United States, we will attend to the ways medical imaginings of the body engage with imperialism and geopolitical boundaries, as well as race, gender, ability, class, and sexuality. (E) {A}{H}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 14
    Course Type: StudioSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 7:05 PM-9:35 PM / REMOTE

    An introduction to the use of digital media in the context of contemporary art practice. Students explore content development and design principles through a series of projects involving text, still image and moving image. This class involves critical discussions of studio projects in relation to contemporary art and theory. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 14. {A}
    Linked Course: No
    ATC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: StudioSection Enrollment: 10
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 9:20 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    An introduction to visual experience through a study of the basic elements of drawing. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 18. {A}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: StudioSection Enrollment: 14
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    An introduction to visual experience through a study of the basic elements of drawing. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 18. {A}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: StudioSection Enrollment: 11
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This cross-disciplinary studio course involves two-dimensional, three-dimensional and time-based approaches. Students are introduced to a range of conceptual and practical frameworks for making and thinking about art. This course is strongly recommended for students considering the art major. By emphasizing visual thinking, risk-taking and critical reflection, this course also has relevance for other disciplines. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Priority given to first-year students. {A}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: StudioSection Enrollment: 10
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    This cross-disciplinary studio course involves two-dimensional, three-dimensional and time-based approaches. Students are introduced to a range of conceptual and practical frameworks for making and thinking about art. This course is strongly recommended for students considering the art major. By emphasizing visual thinking, risk-taking and critical reflection, this course also has relevance for other disciplines. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Priority given to first-year students. {A}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 14
    Course Type: StudioSection Enrollment: 6
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This course builds working knowledge of multimedia digital artwork through experience with a variety of software, focusing on video and time-based media. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 14. (No prerequisite required.) {A}
    Linked Course: No
    ATC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: StudioSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Various spatial and pictorial concepts are investigated through the oil medium. Prerequisite: ARS 163 or permission of the instructor. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 18. {A}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: StudioSection Enrollment: 12
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Topics Course. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. May be repeated with a different topic. 

    While collaborative and community-oriented, printmaking is usually tied to specific equipment and resources that can be difficult to access. This course emphasizes how printmaking as a process and way of thinking can both support a creative community and adapt to respond directly and personally to one’s current circumstances. We will use water-based methods such as stenciling, relief printing, texture rubbing, and basic book construction to explore our perception of time, variation, location, color, and transparency. These methods have the capacity to create work that is small and intimate, large and immersive, and/or continually in flux. {A}
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: StudioSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 9:20 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    The human figure and other natural forms. Work in modeling and plaster casting. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: ARS 163, 172, or permission of the instructor. {A}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: StudioSection Enrollment: 6
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    (1) Investigates the structure of the book as a form; (2) provides a brief history of the Latin alphabet and how it is shaped calligraphically and constructed geometrically; (3) studies traditional and non-traditional typography; and (4) practices the composition of metal type by hand and the printing of composed type on the SP-15 printing presses. A voluntary introduction to digital typography is also offered outside class. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 12. {A}
    Linked Course: No
    BKX Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: StudioSection Enrollment: 10
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Relief printing from carved woodblocks can create images that range from precise and delicate to raw and expressionistic. It is a direct and flexible process that allows for printing on a variety of materials at large and small scales. We will use both ancient and contemporary technologies to produce black and white and color prints from single and multiple blocks. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: ARS 163 or 172, or permission of the instructor. {A}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: StudioSection Enrollment: 10
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    In nurturing architecture’s foundational principles of visual, material and conceptual experimentation, ARS 280 lays the foundation for subsequent studios, lifelong learning and curiosity for architectural design processes. It probes the material, organizational and spatial qualities of the ground—a shared horizontal territory inhabited by plants, people and buildings—one that is as much cultural as it is natural. Through iterative and analog processes, students integrate drawing and making to construct and reconstruct lines in the ground. Probing the physical and conceptual ground for natural or constructed patterns, students develop foundation-level design skills within the context of larger environmental and cultural discourses. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: ARH 110 or permission of the instructor. {A}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: StudioSection Enrollment: 10
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    An introduction to visual experience through a study of the basic elements of photography as an expressive medium. Each section involves either black and white or a combination of darkroom and digital processes. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: ARS 162, 172 or permission of the instructor. {A}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: StudioSection Enrollment: 5
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 9:20 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    This research-based architectural design studio utilizes digital processes to analyze and reinterpret canonical architectural precedents, linking the digital to fluid conceptual ideas which are both historic and contemporary. In particular, the studio probes the spatial qualities of the moving body—as a site of both deep interiority and hyper-connectivity. In a return to the territory of the ground (see ARS 280), and within the larger context of ecologically and geopolitically induced migration and displacement, this studio investigates themes related to mobility and transience and the ways in which the body traverses territories of ground. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: ARS 280 and ARS 281 or permission of the instructor. {A}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: StudioSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This capstone course is required for all senior ARS majors. Students will use the framework of the course to focus, challenge and re-conceptualize their studio work in media of their choice. Critiques, readings, written assignments, presentations and discussions will support the development of an inventive and rigorous independent art practice. The semester will culminate in a group exhibition. Core studio materials are provided. Students are responsible for the purchase of additional supplies required for individual projects. Enrollment limited to Smith College Senior ARS majors. {A}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to ARS majors AND Limited to seniors
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 29
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    A comprehensive introduction to the study of modern astronomy, covering planets—their origins, orbits, interiors, surfaces and atmospheres; stars—their formation, structure and evolution; and the universe—its origin, large-scale structure and ultimate destiny. This introductory course is for students who are planning to major in science or math. Prerequisite: MTH 111 or the equivalent. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W Th 12:30 PM-1:20 PM / REMOTE

    Discover the fundamental properties of stars from the analysis of digital images and application of basic laws of physics. Extensive use of computers and scientific programming and data analysis. Offered in alternate years with 225. Prerequisites: PHY 117, MTH 111, plus one astronomy class. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 10
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE , Remote Instruction T 7:30 PM-9:00 PM / REMOTE

    In this section of AST 337 we provide an introduction to the techniques of gathering and analyzing astronomical data, with an emphasis on optical observations related to studying stellar evolution. Students use Smith’s telescopes and CCD cameras to collect and analyze their own data, using the Python computing language. Topics covered include astronomical coordinate and time systems; telescope design and optics; instrumentation and techniques for imaging and photometry; astronomical detectors; digital image processing tools and techniques; atmospheric phenomena affecting astronomical observations; and error analysis and curve fitting. Prerequisites: at least one of AST 224, 225, 226 or 228, and one physics course at the 200-level. Previous experience in computer programming is strongly recommended. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 20
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    Chemical dynamics in living systems. Enzyme mechanisms, metabolism and its regulation, energy production and utilization. Prerequisites: BCH 252 and CHM 224. Laboratory (353) must be taken concurrently by biochemistry majors; optional for others. {N}
    Linked Course: Yes
    CHM Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: DiscussSection Enrollment: 20
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction F 12:30 PM-1:20 PM / REMOTE

    Chemical dynamics in living systems. Enzyme mechanisms, metabolism and its regulation, energy production and utilization. Prerequisites: BCH 252 and CHM 224. Laboratory (353) must be taken concurrently by biochemistry majors; optional for others. {N}
    Linked Course: Yes
    CHM Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 11
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Investigations of biochemical systems using experimental techniques in current biochemical research. Emphasis is on independent experimental design and execution. BCH 352 is a prerequisite or must be taken concurrently. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): BCH 352
    CHM Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 8
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Investigations of biochemical systems using experimental techniques in current biochemical research. Emphasis is on independent experimental design and execution. BCH 352 is a prerequisite or must be taken concurrently. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): BCH 352
    CHM Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 36
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    A course dealing with current topics in biology that are important in understanding important issues in today’s modern world. Many of these issues present important choices that must be made by individuals and by governments. Topics include cloning of plants and animals, human cloning, stem cell research, genetically modified organisms, CRISPR, bioterrorism, emerging infectious diseases such as coronavirus, Ebola, Zika and West Nile, gene therapy, DNA diagnostics and forensics, genome projects, human origins, human diversity, species extinction and de-extinction and others. The course includes outside readings and in-class discussions. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 11
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Experiential, field-based course that seeks to ground students in the planted landscape and nurture a sense of place. Identification, morphology and uses of landscape plants including annuals, perennials, woody shrubs and trees, evergreens and groundcovers. Horticultural practices such as pruning, division, hybridizing, bulb planting, close observation, and design basics. Discussions will consider equity and access, local food systems, ecosystem services, urban greening, and climate/sustainability. Field trips (remote only in 2020) are an important component of the course. Projects include a field journal, short skill-share presentations, and a landscape design activity. Students who have already taken BIO 120/121 are not eligible to take BIO 125. Enrollment limit of 15 per section. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Experiential, field-based course that seeks to ground students in the planted landscape and nurture a sense of place. Identification, morphology and uses of landscape plants including annuals, perennials, woody shrubs and trees, evergreens and groundcovers. Horticultural practices such as pruning, division, hybridizing, bulb planting, close observation, and design basics. Discussions will consider equity and access, local food systems, ecosystem services, urban greening, and climate/sustainability. Field trips (remote only in 2020) are an important component of the course. Projects include a field journal, short skill-share presentations, and a landscape design activity. Students who have already taken BIO 120/121 are not eligible to take BIO 125. Enrollment limit of 15 per section. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 99
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 59
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Students in this course investigate the origin, nature and importance of the diversity of life on Earth; key ecological processes and interactions that create and maintain communities and ecosystems; principle threats to biodiversity; and emerging conservation strategies to protect the elements and processes upon which we depend. Throughout the semester, we emphasize the relevance of diversity and ecological studies in conservation. Laboratory (BIO 131) is recommended but not required. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    ENV Crosslist, LSS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 12
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Pull on your boots and come explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens, and local hemlock forests. Students will gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students will practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed will include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Because research projects will vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. BIO 130 is recommended as a prerequisite or co-requisite but is not required. (E) {N}
    Linked Course: No
    ENV Crosslist, LSS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Pull on your boots and come explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens, and local hemlock forests. Students will gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students will practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed will include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Because research projects will vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. BIO 130 is recommended as a prerequisite or co-requisite but is not required. (E) {N}
    Linked Course: No
    ENV Crosslist, LSS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Pull on your boots and come explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens, and local hemlock forests. Students will gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students will practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed will include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Because research projects will vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. BIO 130 is recommended as a prerequisite or co-requisite but is not required. (E) {N}
    Linked Course: No
    ENV Crosslist, LSS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Pull on your boots and come explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens, and local hemlock forests. Students will gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students will practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed will include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Because research projects will vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. BIO 130 is recommended as a prerequisite or co-requisite but is not required. (E) {N}
    Linked Course: No
    ENV Crosslist, LSS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 81
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 67
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Students in this course investigate the structure, function and physiology of cells; the properties of biological molecules; information transfer from the level of DNA to cell-cell communication; and cellular energy generation and transfer. The development of multicellular organisms and the physiology of selected organ systems is also explored. In addition to attending lectures, each student participates in discussion sections that focus on data analysis and interpretation while integrating mechanisms across scales. Laboratory (BIO 133) is recommended but not required. {N}
    Linked Course: Yes
    BCH Crosslist, NSC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 27
    Course Type: DiscussSection Enrollment: 23
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 4:50 PM-5:40 PM / REMOTE

    Students in this course investigate the structure, function and physiology of cells; the properties of biological molecules; information transfer from the level of DNA to cell-cell communication; and cellular energy generation and transfer. The development of multicellular organisms and the physiology of selected organ systems is also explored. In addition to attending lectures, each student participates in discussion sections that focus on data analysis and interpretation while integrating mechanisms across scales. Laboratory (BIO 133) is recommended but not required. {N}
    Linked Course: Yes
    BCH Crosslist, NSC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 27
    Course Type: DiscussSection Enrollment: 27
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 12:30 PM-1:20 PM / REMOTE

    Students in this course investigate the structure, function and physiology of cells; the properties of biological molecules; information transfer from the level of DNA to cell-cell communication; and cellular energy generation and transfer. The development of multicellular organisms and the physiology of selected organ systems is also explored. In addition to attending lectures, each student participates in discussion sections that focus on data analysis and interpretation while integrating mechanisms across scales. Laboratory (BIO 133) is recommended but not required. {N}
    Linked Course: Yes
    BCH Crosslist, NSC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 27
    Course Type: DiscussSection Enrollment: 17
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 4:50 PM-5:40 PM / REMOTE

    Students in this course investigate the structure, function and physiology of cells; the properties of biological molecules; information transfer from the level of DNA to cell-cell communication; and cellular energy generation and transfer. The development of multicellular organisms and the physiology of selected organ systems is also explored. In addition to attending lectures, each student participates in discussion sections that focus on data analysis and interpretation while integrating mechanisms across scales. Laboratory (BIO 133) is recommended but not required. {N}
    Linked Course: Yes
    BCH Crosslist, NSC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This Laboratory Course introduces students to biological discovery and the biological research process. Students will gain hands-on experience with the use of modern biological research methods by participating in ongoing research with a variety of organisms. This includes scientific discovery, hypothesis development, data collection and analysis, as well as presentation of your own discoveries and results. Research projects vary with each Instructor. Prerequisite: BIO 132 , (normally taken concurrently). {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): BIO 132 OR BIO 150
    BCH Crosslist, NSC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This Laboratory Course introduces students to biological discovery and the biological research process. Students will gain hands-on experience with the use of modern biological research methods by participating in ongoing research with a variety of organisms. This includes scientific discovery, hypothesis development, data collection and analysis, as well as presentation of your own discoveries and results. Research projects vary with each Instructor. Prerequisite: BIO 132 , (normally taken concurrently). {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): BIO 132 OR BIO 150
    BCH Crosslist, NSC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This Laboratory Course introduces students to biological discovery and the biological research process. Students will gain hands-on experience with the use of modern biological research methods by participating in ongoing research with a variety of organisms. This includes scientific discovery, hypothesis development, data collection and analysis, as well as presentation of your own discoveries and results. Research projects vary with each Instructor. Prerequisite: BIO 132 , (normally taken concurrently). {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): BIO 132 OR BIO 150
    BCH Crosslist, NSC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 8
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This Laboratory Course introduces students to biological discovery and the biological research process. Students will gain hands-on experience with the use of modern biological research methods by participating in ongoing research with a variety of organisms. This includes scientific discovery, hypothesis development, data collection and analysis, as well as presentation of your own discoveries and results. Research projects vary with each Instructor. Prerequisite: BIO 132 , (normally taken concurrently). {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): BIO 132 OR BIO 150
    BCH Crosslist, NSC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 52
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    In this course you will learn how animal bodies function from the molecular to the organismal level and how the physiology of animals, including humans, has been shaped by evolution to enable survival in a wide range of environments. Course content is organized by body system (cardiovascular, respiratory, reproductive, etc.). Assignments provide opportunities for students to practice applying their knowledge of physiology to real-life situations, predicting the outcomes of experiments, and interpreting and writing about the primary literature. Prerequisites: BIO 132/133 and CHM 111 or CHM 118. Laboratory (BIO 201) is recommended but not required. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    BCH Crosslist, NSC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 55
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    The structure and function of eukaryotic cells. This course examines contemporary topics in cellular biology: cellular structures, organelle function, membrane and endomembrane systems, cellular regulation, signaling mechanisms, motility, bioelectricity, communication and cellular energetics. This course is a prerequisite for Biochemistry I (BCH 252). Prerequisites: BIO 132/133 and CHM 222. Laboratory (BIO 203) is recommended but not required. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    BCH Crosslist, NSC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Inquiry-based laboratory using techniques such as spectrophotometry, enzyme kinetics, bright field and fluorescence light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The emphasis is on student-designed projects. This course is a prerequisite for Biochemistry I Laboratory (BCH 253). Prerequisite: BIO 202, (should be taken concurrently). {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): BIO 202
    BCH Crosslist, NSC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Inquiry-based laboratory using techniques such as spectrophotometry, enzyme kinetics, bright field and fluorescence light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The emphasis is on student-designed projects. This course is a prerequisite for Biochemistry I Laboratory (BCH 253). Prerequisite: BIO 202, (should be taken concurrently). {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): BIO 202
    BCH Crosslist, NSC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 10
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction F 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Inquiry-based laboratory using techniques such as spectrophotometry, enzyme kinetics, bright field and fluorescence light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The emphasis is on student-designed projects. This course is a prerequisite for Biochemistry I Laboratory (BCH 253). Prerequisite: BIO 202, (should be taken concurrently). {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): BIO 202
    BCH Crosslist, NSC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 14
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Inquiry-based laboratory using techniques such as spectrophotometry, enzyme kinetics, bright field and fluorescence light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The emphasis is on student-designed projects. This course is a prerequisite for Biochemistry I Laboratory (BCH 253). Prerequisite: BIO 202, (should be taken concurrently). {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): BIO 202
    BCH Crosslist, NSC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 46
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Evolution frames much of biology by providing insights into how and why things change over time. For example, the study of evolution is essential to: understanding transitions in biodiversity across time and space, elucidating patterns of genetic variation within and between populations, and developing both vaccines and treatments for human diseases. Topics in this course include population genetics, molecular evolution, speciation, phylogenetics and macroevolution. Prerequisite: BIO 130 or BIO 132 or permission of the instructor. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    SDS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 3Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 21
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    The oceans cover over 75 percent of the Earth and are home to enormous biodiversity. Marine Ecology explores a variety of coastal and oceanic systems, focusing on natural and human-induced factors that affect biodiversity and the ecological balance in marine habitats. Using case studies, we study some successful conservation and management strategies, including Marine Protected Areas. This course uses a variety of readings, group activities and short writing assignments to develop vital skills such as effective oral, graphical and written communication; critical thinking; and problem solving. Enrollment limited to 24. Laboratory (BIO 269) must be taken concurrently and includes two field trips.  {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: BIO 269
    ENV Crosslist, LSS Crosslist, MSC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 12
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    The laboratory applies concepts discussed in lecture and uses several small-group projects in the field and laboratory to develop relevant skills for conducting marine-related research. Students learn to design and analyze experiments, and to write in the scientific style. Field trips to Maine and Cape Cod, Mass., provide hands-on experience with marine organisms in their natural habitats. Corequisite: BIO 268, which must be taken concurrently. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: BIO 268
    ENV Crosslist, LSS Crosslist, MSC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    The laboratory applies concepts discussed in lecture and uses several small-group projects in the field and laboratory to develop relevant skills for conducting marine-related research. Students learn to design and analyze experiments, and to write in the scientific style. Field trips to Maine and Cape Cod, Mass., provide hands-on experience with marine organisms in their natural habitats. Corequisite: BIO 268, which must be taken concurrently. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: BIO 268
    ENV Crosslist, LSS Crosslist, MSC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 22
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction / REMOTE

    Fundamental concepts of nervous system function at the cellular level (electrical signals, membrane potentials, propagation, synapses) and also the systems level (motor control, generating behavior, perception of visual form, color and movement). This course provides a strong foundation for BIO 310 and NSC 318. See website (tinyurl.com/bio300) for full syllabus. Prerequisites: BIO 200 or 202 or NSC 210. {N}
    Linked Course: Yes
    NSC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: DiscussSection Enrollment: 17
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 4:50 PM-5:40 PM / REMOTE

    Fundamental concepts of nervous system function at the cellular level (electrical signals, membrane potentials, propagation, synapses) and also the systems level (motor control, generating behavior, perception of visual form, color and movement). This course provides a strong foundation for BIO 310 and NSC 318. See website (tinyurl.com/bio300) for full syllabus. Prerequisites: BIO 200 or 202 or NSC 210. {N}
    Linked Course: Yes
    NSC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: DiscussSection Enrollment: 5
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Class T 8:30 PM-9:30 PM / REMOTE

    Fundamental concepts of nervous system function at the cellular level (electrical signals, membrane potentials, propagation, synapses) and also the systems level (motor control, generating behavior, perception of visual form, color and movement). This course provides a strong foundation for BIO 310 and NSC 318. See website (tinyurl.com/bio300) for full syllabus. Prerequisites: BIO 200 or 202 or NSC 210. {N}
    Linked Course: Yes
    NSC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 28
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    An introduction to the immune system covering the molecular, cellular, and genetic bases of immunity to infectious agents. Special topics include immunodeficiencies, transplantation, allergies, immunopathology and immunotherapies. Prerequisite: At least one of the following: BIO 202, 204 or 230. Laboratory (BIO 307) is recommended but not required. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    BCH Crosslist
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  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 14
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    The use of immunological techniques in clinical diagnosis and as research tools. Experimental exercises include immune cell population analysis, immunofluorescence, Western blotting, ELISA and agglutination reactions. An independent project is completed at the end of the term. Prerequisite: BIO 306 (may be taken concurrently). Enrollment limited to 16 students. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): BIO 306
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 6
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction F 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Instrument specific topics course designed and highly recommended for research students (special studies, honors, SURF, etc.) requiring future access to microscope equipment in the Center for Microscopy and Imaging (CMI). Students will discuss the need of the Microscope system of their choice for their research project by preparing and presenting short presentations and a poster (or alternative format). Emphasized are group and/or individual demonstration sessions required to learn about the principles and operating parameters of a microscope system (see topics). Digital Imaging and Image Analysis Techniques will be discussed. Evaluation will be through engagement in assigned activities. 400 level work cannot overlap with this course work. Instructor permission only. Enrollment limited to 6. S/U only. 

    The LSCM is used to study fluorescently labelled live or fixed cells, tissues, and small organisms. By blocking the out-of-focus light, the image quality is improved compared to widefield fluorescence microscopy. Optical sections of materials can be collected and used to reconstruct the three-dimensional structure. Mechanical and optical components will be reviewed and operational parameters improving image quality covered. Instruction includes lectures, demonstrations and discussions and substitutes part of CMI training towards independent microscope use. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 6
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 0
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction F 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Instrument specific topics course designed and highly recommended for research students (special studies, honors, SURF, etc.) requiring future access to microscope equipment in the Center for Microscopy and Imaging (CMI). Students will discuss the need of the Microscope system of their choice for their research project by preparing and presenting short presentations and a poster (or alternative format). Emphasized are group and/or individual demonstration sessions required to learn about the principles and operating parameters of a microscope system (see topics). Digital Imaging and Image Analysis Techniques will be discussed. Evaluation will be through engagement in assigned activities. 400 level work cannot overlap with this course work. Instructor permission only. Enrollment limited to 6. S/U only. 

    The SEM is used to examine small surface features of both biological and nonbiological materials. By using a beam of electrons, a resolution of 3-10nm can be achieved. Besides high-resolution surface topography, compositional information about a sample can be collected when the system is equipped with an X-ray detector. Mechanical and optical components will be reviewed and operational parameters improving image quality covered. Instruction includes lectures, demonstrations and discussions and substitutes part of CMI training towards independent microscope use. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 6
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 0
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction F 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Instrument specific topics course designed and highly recommended for research students (special studies, honors, SURF, etc.) requiring future access to microscope equipment in the Center for Microscopy and Imaging (CMI). Students will discuss the need of the Microscope system of their choice for their research project by preparing and presenting short presentations and a poster (or alternative format). Emphasized are group and/or individual demonstration sessions required to learn about the principles and operating parameters of a microscope system (see topics). Digital Imaging and Image Analysis Techniques will be discussed. Evaluation will be through engagement in assigned activities. 400 level work cannot overlap with this course work. Instructor permission only. Enrollment limited to 6. S/U only. 

    The TIRFM is used to study fluorescently labelled molecules in a very thin region of the sample adjacent to the coverglass. With a depth of up to ~100nm, this technique is well-suited to examine, for example, individual molecules, cell membranes, and other cell surface components and processes. Mechanical and optical components will be reviewed and operational parameters improving image quality covered. Instruction includes lectures, demonstrations and discussions and substitutes part of CMI training towards independent microscope use. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 6
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 0
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction F 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Instrument specific topics course designed and highly recommended for research students (special studies, honors, SURF, etc.) requiring future access to microscope equipment in the Center for Microscopy and Imaging (CMI). Students will discuss the need of the Microscope system of their choice for their research project by preparing and presenting short presentations and a poster (or alternative format). Emphasized are group and/or individual demonstration sessions required to learn about the principles and operating parameters of a microscope system (see topics). Digital Imaging and Image Analysis Techniques will be discussed. Evaluation will be through engagement in assigned activities. 400 level work cannot overlap with this course work. Instructor permission only. Enrollment limited to 6. S/U only. 

    The TEM is used to study morphological features of large molecules, cells, tissues, small organisms, and particles at a resolution of 0.3 nm. Ultrathin sections (~100nm) need to be cut to study internal features of cells and tissue. Negative staining techniques can be applied to observe large molecules, small organisms, and particles. Mechanical and optical components will be reviewed and operational parameters improving image quality covered. Instruction includes lectures, demonstrations and discussions and substitutes part of CMI training towards independent microscope use. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 3Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 6
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Topics course. 

    This seminar will emphasize the role of immunology in disease manifestation, vaccine design, and biologics to better understand how we can more effectively treat and prevent COVID-19 infections. The goal is to have students use their foundational knowledge in immunology and apply it to this real-time, highly significant pandemic. The class will also explore questions of public health, politics, social justice, and economics that are intricately woven into our decisions on how to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. Other emerging infectious diseases where we have (or had) the same needs (e.g., influenza, Zika, Ebola, MERS/SARS) will be examined to understand what we can learn from these case studies. {N}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    Enforced Prereq(s): BIO 306
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 3Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 17
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    This course focuses on methods and approaches in the emerging fields of bioinformatics and molecular evolution. Topics include the quantitative examination of genetic variation; selective and stochastic forces shaping proteins and catalytic RNA; data mining; comparative analysis of whole genome data sets; comparative genomics and bioinformatics; and hypothesis testing in computational biology. We explore the role of bioinformatics and comparative methods in the fields of molecular medicine, drug design, and in systematic, conservation and population biology. Prerequisite: BIO 132, or BIO 230, or BIO 232, or permission of the instructor. Laboratory (BIO 335) is strongly recommended but not required. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    SDS Crosslist
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  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 14
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 7:05 PM-9:35 PM / REMOTE

    This lab introduces the computational and quantitative tools underlying contemporary bioinformatics. We explore the various approaches to phylogenetic reconstruction using molecular data, methods of data mining in genome databases, comparative genomics, structure-function modeling, and the use of molecular data to reconstruct population and evolutionary history. Students are encouraged to explore datasets of particular interest to them. Prerequisite: BIO 334 (normally taken concurrently), or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 14. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): BIO 334
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 3Max Enrollment: 40
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 23
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Ongoing developments in high-throughput sequencing technologies have made genomic analysis a central feature of many scientific disciplines, including forensics, medicine, ecology, and evolution. This course will review the scope and applications of genome sequencing projects. After completing the course, students will be prepared to design a high-throughput sequencing project and interpret the results of genomic analysis. Prerequisite: BIO 230, BIO 232, or permission of the instructor. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 7:05 PM-9:35 PM / REMOTE

    This lab will cover genomic analysis pipelines from nucleic acid isolation to sequence analysis in Linux and R environments. Students will independently design and execute a high-throughput sequencing experiment to measure genetic variation in natural populations. Prerequisite: BIO 230, BIO 232, or permission of the instructor. Genomics Lecture (BIO 336) normally taken concurrently. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: BIO 336
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 3Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 14
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Topics course. 

    There is increasing evidence of epigenetic phenomena influencing the development of organisms and the transmission of information between generations. These epigenetic phenomena include the inheritance of acquired morphological traits in some lineages and the apparent transmission of RNA caches between generations in plants, animals and microbes. This seminar explores emerging data on epigenetics and discusses the impact of these phenomena on evolution. Participants write an independent research paper on a topic of their choice. Prerequisite: BIO 230, 232 or permission of the instructor. {N}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 3Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 20
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    This course surveys the environmental factors, historical processes and ecological interactions that influence the distribution and abundance of plant species in the landscape. The class examines how plant communities are assembled and what processes influence their structure and diversity, including past and present human activities. We focus in particular on plant communities of the Northeast, using examples from the local landscape to illustrate key ecological concepts. Prerequisite: a course in plant biology, ecology or environmental science; statistics is recommended (e.g., MTH 220). BIO 365 must be taken concurrently. Enrollment limited to 20. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: BIO 365
    ENV Crosslist, LSS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 20
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This lab course involves field and laboratory investigations of plant ecology, with an emphasis on Northeastern plant species and plant communities. The labs explore interactions between plants and insects, visit wetland and upland habitats, and investigate plant population dynamics at sites around western Massachusetts. Students gain hands-on experience with descriptive and experimental research approaches used to investigate ecological processes in plant communities. BIO 364 must be taken concurrently. Enrollment limited to 20. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: BIO 364
    ENV Crosslist, LSS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    Students in this seminar discuss articles from the primary literature representing diverse fields of biology and present on their own research projects. Journal articles will be selected to coordinate with departmental colloquia. In alternate weeks, students present talks on research goals, data collection and data analysis. This course is required for graduate students and must be taken both years. 
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to BIO majors AND Limited to graduates
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 3
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction / REMOTE

    The culminating experience for the book studies concentration is an independent research project that synthesizes the student’s academic and practical experiences. The student’s concentration adviser may or may not serve as the sponsor for the project; topics for this capstone project is decided in concert with the student’s adviser and vetted by the concentration’s director. The seminar meets once each week to discuss methodology and progress on the independent projects and to discuss general readings in book studies theory and praxis. Enrollment limited to book studies concentrators who are seniors. Graded S/U only. 
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to seniors
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 47
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M 7:05 PM-9:35 PM / REMOTE

    This course introduces students to the academic study of Buddhism through readings, lectures by Smith faculty and guests, and trips to local Buddhist centers. We critically examine the history of Buddhist studies within the context of numerous disciplines, including anthropology, art, cultural studies, gender studies, government, literature, philosophy and religion, with a focus on regional, sectarian and historical differences. Materials to be considered include poetry, painting, philosophy, political tracts and more. This course meets during the first half of the semester only. Graded S/U only.  First half of term course. {H}
    Linked Course: No
    REL Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 46
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 7:30 PM-8:20 PM / REMOTE

    Using chemical reactions to make quantitative predictions is a foundational skill in chemistry. This skill is built on a set of quantitative approaches including dimensional analysis, reaction stoichiometry and physical measurement. Students will build and refine these skills through both individual and group work in a small class setting. This course is a co- or prerequisite for CHM 111; students will be recommended for this course on the basis of a short placement exam. For these students successful completion of CHM 110 is required to enter any CHM courses with a CHM 111 prerequisite. (E) 
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 111
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 55
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 58
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    The first semester of our core chemistry curriculum introduces the language(s) of chemistry and explores atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiometry. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. Multiple sections are offered at different times, as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Corequisite: CHM 111L {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 111L
    BCH Crosslist, ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 55
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 36
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    The first semester of our core chemistry curriculum introduces the language(s) of chemistry and explores atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiometry. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. Multiple sections are offered at different times, as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Corequisite: CHM 111L {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 111L
    BCH Crosslist, ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 55
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 50
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    The first semester of our core chemistry curriculum introduces the language(s) of chemistry and explores atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiometry. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. Multiple sections are offered at different times, as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Corequisite: CHM 111L {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 111L
    BCH Crosslist, ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 9:20 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Lab Section. The first semester of our core chemistry curriculum introduces the language(s) of chemistry and explores atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiometry. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. Multiple sections are offered at different times, as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Corequisite: CHM 111 {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 111
    BCH Crosslist, ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 10
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 9:20 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Lab Section. The first semester of our core chemistry curriculum introduces the language(s) of chemistry and explores atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiometry. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. Multiple sections are offered at different times, as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Corequisite: CHM 111 {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 111
    BCH Crosslist, ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 12
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction F 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Lab Section. The first semester of our core chemistry curriculum introduces the language(s) of chemistry and explores atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiometry. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. Multiple sections are offered at different times, as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Corequisite: CHM 111 {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 111
    BCH Crosslist, ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 12
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction F 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Lab Section. The first semester of our core chemistry curriculum introduces the language(s) of chemistry and explores atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiometry. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. Multiple sections are offered at different times, as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Corequisite: CHM 111 {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 111
    BCH Crosslist, ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Lab Section. The first semester of our core chemistry curriculum introduces the language(s) of chemistry and explores atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiometry. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. Multiple sections are offered at different times, as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Corequisite: CHM 111 {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 111
    BCH Crosslist, ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 8
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Lab Section. The first semester of our core chemistry curriculum introduces the language(s) of chemistry and explores atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiometry. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. Multiple sections are offered at different times, as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Corequisite: CHM 111 {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 111
    BCH Crosslist, ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Lab Section. The first semester of our core chemistry curriculum introduces the language(s) of chemistry and explores atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiometry. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. Multiple sections are offered at different times, as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Corequisite: CHM 111 {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 111
    BCH Crosslist, ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 10
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Lab Section. The first semester of our core chemistry curriculum introduces the language(s) of chemistry and explores atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiometry. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. Multiple sections are offered at different times, as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Corequisite: CHM 111 {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 111
    BCH Crosslist, ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Lab Section. The first semester of our core chemistry curriculum introduces the language(s) of chemistry and explores atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiometry. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. Multiple sections are offered at different times, as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Corequisite: CHM 111 {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 111
    BCH Crosslist, ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Lab Section. The first semester of our core chemistry curriculum introduces the language(s) of chemistry and explores atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiometry. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. Multiple sections are offered at different times, as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Corequisite: CHM 111 {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 111
    BCH Crosslist, ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 12
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Lab Section. The first semester of our core chemistry curriculum introduces the language(s) of chemistry and explores atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiometry. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. Multiple sections are offered at different times, as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Corequisite: CHM 111 {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 111
    BCH Crosslist, ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Lab Section. The first semester of our core chemistry curriculum introduces the language(s) of chemistry and explores atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiometry. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. Multiple sections are offered at different times, as detailed in the Schedule of Classes. At the time of registration students must register for both a lecture and a lab section that fit their course schedule. Corequisite: CHM 111 {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 111
    BCH Crosslist, ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 5
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This laboratory is for students with strong preparation in chemistry and is a companion to CHM 114. Topics covered include solution chemistry and pH, visible spectroscopy, chemical quantification, inorganic complexes, and equilibrium. Students will develop a strong foundation of laboratory safety and chemistry lab techniques with a focus on iterative experimental design and careful observation. Students will also practice scientific communication skills via keeping a lab notebook, writing reports, and presenting to classmates. Students should have an AP chemistry score of 4 or 5 (or the equivalent) or permission of the instructor. (E) {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s):  OR
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 6
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This laboratory is for students with strong preparation in chemistry and is a companion to CHM 114. Topics covered include solution chemistry and pH, visible spectroscopy, chemical quantification, inorganic complexes, and equilibrium. Students will develop a strong foundation of laboratory safety and chemistry lab techniques with a focus on iterative experimental design and careful observation. Students will also practice scientific communication skills via keeping a lab notebook, writing reports, and presenting to classmates. Students should have an AP chemistry score of 4 or 5 (or the equivalent) or permission of the instructor. (E) {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s):  OR
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 8
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction F 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This laboratory is for students with strong preparation in chemistry and is a companion to CHM 114. Topics covered include solution chemistry and pH, visible spectroscopy, chemical quantification, inorganic complexes, and equilibrium. Students will develop a strong foundation of laboratory safety and chemistry lab techniques with a focus on iterative experimental design and careful observation. Students will also practice scientific communication skills via keeping a lab notebook, writing reports, and presenting to classmates. Students should have an AP chemistry score of 4 or 5 (or the equivalent) or permission of the instructor. (E) {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s):  OR
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 45
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 33
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 7:45 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    Material builds on introductory organic chemistry topics covered in CHM 222 and focuses more heavily on retrosynthetic analysis and multistep synthetic planning. Specific topics include reactions of alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers; aromaticity and reactions of benzene; and cycloaddition reactions including the Diels-Alder reaction. Prerequisite: CHM 222/222L. Corequisite: CHM 223L. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 223LEnforced Prereq(s): CHM 222
    BCH Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 45
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 29
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Material builds on introductory organic chemistry topics covered in CHM 222 and focuses more heavily on retrosynthetic analysis and multistep synthetic planning. Specific topics include reactions of alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers; aromaticity and reactions of benzene; and cycloaddition reactions including the Diels-Alder reaction. Prerequisite: CHM 222/222L. Corequisite: CHM 223L. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 223LEnforced Prereq(s): CHM 222
    BCH Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / FORD 223

    Lab section. Material builds on introductory organic chemistry topics covered in CHM 222 and focuses more heavily on retrosynthetic analysis and multistep synthetic planning. Specific topics include reactions of alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers; aromaticity and reactions of benzene; and cycloaddition reactions including the Diels-Alder reaction. Prerequisite: CHM 222/222L (or equivalent). Corequisite: CHM 223. Enrollment limited to 16. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 223Enforced Prereq(s): CHM 222
    BCH Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 9:20 AM-12:10 PM / FORD 223

    Lab section. Material builds on introductory organic chemistry topics covered in CHM 222 and focuses more heavily on retrosynthetic analysis and multistep synthetic planning. Specific topics include reactions of alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers; aromaticity and reactions of benzene; and cycloaddition reactions including the Diels-Alder reaction. Prerequisite: CHM 222/222L (or equivalent). Corequisite: CHM 223. Enrollment limited to 16. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 223Enforced Prereq(s): CHM 222
    BCH Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 7:05 PM-10:00 PM / REMOTE

    Lab section. Material builds on introductory organic chemistry topics covered in CHM 222 and focuses more heavily on retrosynthetic analysis and multistep synthetic planning. Specific topics include reactions of alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers; aromaticity and reactions of benzene; and cycloaddition reactions including the Diels-Alder reaction. Prerequisite: CHM 222/222L (or equivalent). Corequisite: CHM 223. Enrollment limited to 16. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 223Enforced Prereq(s): CHM 222
    BCH Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / FORD 223

    Lab section. Material builds on introductory organic chemistry topics covered in CHM 222 and focuses more heavily on retrosynthetic analysis and multistep synthetic planning. Specific topics include reactions of alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers; aromaticity and reactions of benzene; and cycloaddition reactions including the Diels-Alder reaction. Prerequisite: CHM 222/222L (or equivalent). Corequisite: CHM 223. Enrollment limited to 16. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 223Enforced Prereq(s): CHM 222
    BCH Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 10
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / FORD 223

    Lab section. Material builds on introductory organic chemistry topics covered in CHM 222 and focuses more heavily on retrosynthetic analysis and multistep synthetic planning. Specific topics include reactions of alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers; aromaticity and reactions of benzene; and cycloaddition reactions including the Diels-Alder reaction. Prerequisite: CHM 222/222L (or equivalent). Corequisite: CHM 223. Enrollment limited to 16. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: CHM 223Enforced Prereq(s): CHM 222
    BCH Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 14
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Quantum chemistry: an introduction to quantum mechanics, the electronic structure of atoms and molecules, with applications in spectroscopy. Prerequisites: 118 or 224 and MTH 112 or MTH 114; strongly recommended: MTH 212 or PHY 210, and PHY 115 or PHY 117. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): (CHM 224 OR CHM 118) AND (MTH 112 OR MTH 114)
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    An introduction to some common environmental chemical processes in air, soil and water, coupled with a study of the crucial role of accurate chemical measurement of these processes. Lecture and laboratory featuring modern chemical instrumentation for spectroscopy (atomic and molecular) high performance chromatographic separations (both gas and liquid), electrochemistry as well as microwave- and ultrasound-assisted sample preparation, and a short project linked to local faculty research interests. Oral presentations and formal laboratory reports required. Prerequisite: CHM 224 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20. {N}
    Linked Course: Yes
    Enforced Prereq(s): CHM 118 OR CHM 224
    ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    An introduction to some common environmental chemical processes in air, soil and water, coupled with a study of the crucial role of accurate chemical measurement of these processes. Lecture and laboratory featuring modern chemical instrumentation for spectroscopy (atomic and molecular) high performance chromatographic separations (both gas and liquid), electrochemistry as well as microwave- and ultrasound-assisted sample preparation, and a short project linked to local faculty research interests. Oral presentations and formal laboratory reports required. Prerequisite: CHM 224 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20. {N}
    Linked Course: Yes
    Enforced Prereq(s): CHM 118 OR CHM 224
    ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 17
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Topics course. 

    An introduction to the principles and methodology of pharmacology, toxicology and drug design. The pharmacology of several drugs are examined in detail, and computational software is used to examine drug binding and to assist in designing a new or modified drug. Some of the ethical and legal considerations relating to drug design, manufacture and use are also considered. Prerequisite: BCH 252 or permission of the instructor. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 8
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Same as ARH 217. This course is a contextual examination of the art and architecture of Ancient Greece, from the end of the Bronze Age through the domination of Greece by Rome (ca. 1100-168 BCE) and handles an array of settlements, cemeteries, and ritual sites. It tracks the development of the Greek city-state and the increasing power of the Greeks in the Mediterranean, culminating in the major diaspora of Greek culture accompanying the campaigns of Alexander the Great and his followers. The course takes a broadly chronological approach, and the question of a unified Greek culture is stressed. Continuing archaeological work is considered.  {A}{H}
    Linked Course: No
    ARC Crosslist, ART Crosslist, MUX Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    A yearlong introduction to ancient Greek through the language of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, the two 8th-century epics that represent the culmination of a long and rich tradition of oral poetry. The ancients regarded these poems as unparalleled masterpieces; the great tragedian Aeschylus called his own plays "crumbs from Homer's table," and both epics have endured over the millennia and are still alive and relevant. Identity, love, seduction, loyalty, the tension between individualism and community, between home and adventure -- these are some of the very human issues the Odyssey explores. Students will learn all the fundamentals of Greek vocabulary and grammar, and experience the joy of reading Homer's Odyssey in the original. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 2
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    An exploration of the poetic masterpieces of the Archaic period. We will study some of the songs bards performed to the accompaniment of the lyre, stories of war, exile and homecoming, monsters and divinities, love and lust. Readings will be chosen from works such as Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Hesiod's Theogony and Works and Days, the Homeric Hymns. {F}{L}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    The Latin language has had an extraordinarily long life, from ancient Rome through the Middle Ages to nineteenth-century Europe, where is remained the language of scholarship and science. Even today it survives in the Romance languages that grew out of it and in the countless English words derived from Latin roots. This course prepares students to read Latin texts in any period or area of interest through a study of the fundamentals of classical Latin grammar and through practice in reading from a range of Latin authors. Some attention will also be given to Roman culture and Latin literary history. This is a full-year course and cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester. Enrollment limited to 30 
    Linked Course: No
    MED Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 6
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    Topics course. Authors vary from year to year, but they are generally chosen from a list that includes epic and lyric poets, historians, orators, comedians and novelists, depending on the interests and needs of the students. May be repeated for credit, provided the topic is not the same. Prerequisite: two courses at the 200 level or permission of the instructor. 

    A study of the tradition of Roman story-telling, stressing the connections among myth, legend and history in narratives of the early city. Topics include the extent to which early Rome is part of the world of Greek myth; the process by which key statesmen and generals in the early legends came to represent the character of the noble families of later ages, and then to symbolize central Roman virtues; the development of these legendary and quasi-historical narratives into a ‘myth’ of the Roman national character; the manipulation of traditional stories in the political and cultural disputes of later eras. Readings from Livy, Ovid, Vergil and Horace. {F}{L}
    Linked Course: No
    ANS Crosslist, MED Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 22
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 7:05 PM-9:05 PM / REMOTE

    Service learning, civic engagement, community-based participatory research and community service are familiar terms for describing forms of community-based learning (CBL) in higher education. Theorists and practitioners continue to debate how students and faculty can best join partners to support community-driven goals in areas nearby colleges and universities. Students consider these issues through exploring the literature of community engagement and learning from the experiences of those who practice its different forms. CCX 120 serves as a gateway course for the Community Engagement and Social Change Concentration. Students are introduced to the varied opportunities available at the college for engaging with communities. S/U only. 
    Linked Course: No
    EDC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 35
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 3:15 PM-4:30 PM

    An introduction to the structure, design and operation of the internet, including the electronic and physical structure of networks; packet switching; how email and web browsers work, domain names, mail protocols, encoding and compression, http and HTML, the design of web pages, the operation of search engines, beginning JavaScript; CSS. Both history and societal implications are explored. Prerequisite: basic familiarity with word processing. Enrollment limited to 35. The course meets for the first half or second half of the semester only. Second half of semester course. {M}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 35
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This introductory course provides students with a broad understanding of computer hardware, software and operating systems. Topics include the history of computers; logic circuits; major hardware components and their design, including processors, memory, disks, and video monitors; programming languages and their role in developing applications; and operating system functions, including file system support and multitasking, multiprogramming and timesharing. Weekly labs give hands-on experience. Enrollment limited to 35. Offered first or second half of the semester. First half of semester course. {M}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Same as SDS 109. The world is growing increasingly reliant on collecting and analyzing information to help people make decisions. Because of this, the ability to communicate effectively about data is an important component of future job prospects across nearly all disciplines. In this course, students learn the foundations of information visualization and sharpen their skills in communicating using data. Throughout the semester, we explore concepts in decision-making, human perception, color theory and storytelling as they apply to data-driven communication. Whether you’re an aspiring data scientist or you just want to learn new ways of presenting information, this course helps you build a strong foundation in how to talk to people about data. {M}
    Linked Course: No
    SDS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 120
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 99
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    Introduction to a block-structured, object-oriented high-level programming language. Covering language syntax and use the language to teach program design, coding, debugging, testing and documentation. Procedural and data abstraction are introduced. {M}
    Linked Course: Yes
    ATC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 30
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction / REMOTE

    Introduction to a block-structured, object-oriented high-level programming language. Covering language syntax and use the language to teach program design, coding, debugging, testing and documentation. Procedural and data abstraction are introduced. {M}
    Linked Course: Yes
    ATC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 27
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction / REMOTE

    Introduction to a block-structured, object-oriented high-level programming language. Covering language syntax and use the language to teach program design, coding, debugging, testing and documentation. Procedural and data abstraction are introduced. {M}
    Linked Course: Yes
    ATC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 17
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction / REMOTE

    Introduction to a block-structured, object-oriented high-level programming language. Covering language syntax and use the language to teach program design, coding, debugging, testing and documentation. Procedural and data abstraction are introduced. {M}
    Linked Course: Yes
    ATC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 25
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction / REMOTE

    Introduction to a block-structured, object-oriented high-level programming language. Covering language syntax and use the language to teach program design, coding, debugging, testing and documentation. Procedural and data abstraction are introduced. {M}
    Linked Course: Yes
    ATC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 60
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 44
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    Explores elementary data structures (linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, graphs) and algorithms (searching, sorting) in a variety of contexts, including event-driven applications with a graphical user interface. Emphasizes object-oriented programming throughout, using the Java programming language. Prerequisite: CSC 111. {M}
    Linked Course: Yes
    ATC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 26
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 8:10 AM-10:00 AM / REMOTE

    Explores elementary data structures (linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, graphs) and algorithms (searching, sorting) in a variety of contexts, including event-driven applications with a graphical user interface. Emphasizes object-oriented programming throughout, using the Java programming language. Prerequisite: CSC 111. {M}
    Linked Course: Yes
    ATC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 18
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 3:15 PM-5:05 PM / REMOTE

    Explores elementary data structures (linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, graphs) and algorithms (searching, sorting) in a variety of contexts, including event-driven applications with a graphical user interface. Emphasizes object-oriented programming throughout, using the Java programming language. Prerequisite: CSC 111. {M}
    Linked Course: Yes
    ATC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 12
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Reinforces programming skills learned in previous programming courses through working on a number of projects. Offers practice for developing modular, reusable, maintainable code. Students will gain more experience with design and development. Prerequisite: 212. {M}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 33
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    An introduction to the architecture of the Intel Pentium class processor and its assembly language in the Linux environment. Students write programs in assembly and explore the architectural features of the Pentium, including its use of the memory, the data formats used to represent information, the implementation of high-level language constructs, integer and floating-point arithmetic, and how the processor deals with I/O devices and interrupts. Prerequisite: 212 or permission of the instructor. {M}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 25
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission (RO)Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    An introduction to the architecture of the Intel Pentium class processor and its assembly language in the Linux environment. Students write programs in assembly and explore the architectural features of the Pentium, including its use of the memory, the data formats used to represent information, the implementation of high-level language constructs, integer and floating-point arithmetic, and how the processor deals with I/O devices and interrupts. Prerequisite: 212 or permission of the instructor. {M}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 26
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    Covers two-dimensional drawings and transformations, three-dimensional graphics, lighting and colors, game design, perspective, curves and surfaces, ray tracing. Employs Postscript, C++, GameMaker, POV-ray, and radiosity. The course accommodates both CS majors, for whom it is programming intensive, and other students with less technical expertise, by having two tracks of assignments. Prerequisites for CSC major credit: CSC 111 and MTH 111 or permission of the instructor; otherwise, CSC 111 or permission of the instructor. {M}
    Linked Course: No
    ATC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 26
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 10:55 AM-11:45 AM / REMOTE

    This course introduces fundamental concepts in the design and implementation of computer communication networks, their protocols and applications. Topics covered include layered network architecture, physical layer and data link protocols; and transport protocols; routing protocols and applications. Most case studies are drawn from the Internet TCP/IP protocol suite. Prerequisites: CSC 111. {M}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 26
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    Covers algorithm design techniques (“divide-and-conquer,” dynamic programming, ”greedy” algorithms, etc.), analysis techniques (including big-O notation, recurrence relations), useful data structures (including heaps, search trees, adjacency lists), efficient algorithms for a variety of problems, and NP-completeness. Prerequisites: 212, MTH 111, MTH 153. {M}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 11
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    When is disruption good? Who is responsible for ensuring that an innovation has a positive impact? Are these impacts shared equitably? How can we eliminate bias from algorithms, if they exist? What assurances can we make about the technology we develop? What are the limitations of professional ethics? This seminar examines the ethical implication (i.e., ethics, justice, political philosophy) of computing and automation. Participants will explore how to design technology responsibly while contributing to progress and growth. Topics include: intellectual property; privacy, security, and freedom of information; automation; globalization; access to technology; artificial intelligence; mass society; and emerging issues. Prerequisite: CSC 212. (E) {S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    Enforced Prereq(s): CSC 212
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  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 40
    Course Type: PerformSection Enrollment: 23
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 8:00 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    DAN 101 is a variable topics studio course which introduces students to the practice and study of diverse forms of movement and dance. These courses present and address physical, somatic, theoretical, and cultural practices in a variety of movement experiences. DAN 101 is designed as a mixed level course that includes the beginning mover as well as the more experienced mover. Students may register for DAN 101 up to three times for credit. Enrollment limited to 40. 

    This course provides students with a practical and theoretical understanding of the relationship between the strength, flexibility, and mobility of the body. Through experiential methods students will learn how the connective tissues of the body function both as an interconnected web which facilitates movement, alignment, and coordination, as well as proprioception. We will develop an individualized practice throughout the semester drawing from various movement systems and dance training methods. We will examine the relationship between strength, flexibility, and agility as applied to dancing. (E) {A}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 40
    Course Type: PerformSection Enrollment: 11
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:40 PM-2:40 PM / REMOTE

    DAN 101 is a variable topics studio course which introduces students to the practice and study of diverse forms of movement and dance. These courses present and address physical, somatic, theoretical, and cultural practices in a variety of movement experiences. DAN 101 is designed as a mixed level course that includes the beginning mover as well as the more experienced mover. Students may register for DAN 101 up to three times for credit. Enrollment limited to 40. 

    This course provides students with a practical and theoretical understanding of the relationship between the strength, flexibility, and mobility of the body. Through experiential methods students will learn how the connective tissues of the body function both as an interconnected web which facilitates movement, alignment, and coordination, as well as proprioception. We will develop an individualized practice throughout the semester drawing from various movement systems and dance training methods. We will examine the relationship between strength, flexibility, and agility as applied to dancing. (E) {A}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: PerformSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This course serves as an accessible dance course for all students interested in dance, regardless of ability and dance experience. Throughout the semester, students are introduced to a variety of dance forms and approaches (contemporary dance, salsa, jazz/funk, improvisation). The course promotes the development of dancing skills, aesthetic appreciation, community connection and cultural literacy. In these studio classes, students learn dance techniques while cultivating physical competencies, artistic creativity and bodily expressivity as a part of a community experience. Assignments, class discussions and movement material are designed to foster critical analysis of contemporary issues related to the interaction of dance and society. (E) {A}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: PerformSection Enrollment: 11
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Prerequisite: 113 or previous dance experience. Enrollment limited to 30. {A}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: PerformSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 4:50 PM-6:05 PM / REMOTE

    Prerequisite: 121 or previous dance experience. Enrollment limited to 25. {A}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 18
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    An introduction to selected scientific aspects of dance, including anatomical identification and terminology, physiological principles, and conditioning/strengthening methodology. These concepts are discussed and explored experientially in relationship to the movement vocabularies of various dance styles. Enrollment limited to 20. Offered in the Five College Department of Dance {A}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 19
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / SEELYE 206

    What are social functions of dance? How does the body signify culture? How does movement articulate identities? What forms of knowledge do dance anthropologists produce, and how? Through theories of performance and embodiment, this course illuminates the relationships between self, body, culture, and society. It discusses the nature of fieldwork and ethnographic research in dance, critically examining how contemporary ethnographers negotiate the historical relationship between anthropology and coloniality. The course highlights ethnographies of dance forms from the Americas, Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Europe. Students conduct a fieldwork project of their choice, engaging in participant observation and fieldnote writing. Enrollment limited to 20. {A}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: PerformSection Enrollment: 10
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    By audition/permission only. Prerequisite: 216. {A}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: PerformSection Enrollment: 4
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 4:50 PM-6:05 PM / REMOTE

    By audition/permission only. {A}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 5
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 8:55 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    This class examines and engages the choreographic process through a study of the interaction of expressive movement with concrete and abstract design ideas. Choreographic ideas developed in this class are based on the premise that design elements can be used as source materials for choreographic intent. In addition to studies and projects, weekly writings are assigned. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 12:30 PM-1:20 PM / REMOTE

    An intensive introduction to spoken Mandarin and modern written Chinese, presenting basic elements of grammar, sentence structures and active mastery of the most commonly used Chinese characters. Emphasis on development of oral/aural proficiency, pronunciation, and the acquisition of skills in reading and writing Chinese characters. 
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 8:10 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    An intensive introduction to spoken Mandarin and modern written Chinese, presenting basic elements of grammar, sentence structures and active mastery of the most commonly used Chinese characters. Emphasis on development of oral/aural proficiency, pronunciation, and the acquisition of skills in reading and writing Chinese characters. 
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 5
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 10:55 AM-11:45 AM / REMOTE

    An intensive introduction to spoken Mandarin and modern written Chinese, presenting basic elements of grammar, sentence structures and active mastery of the most commonly used Chinese characters. Emphasis on development of oral/aural proficiency, pronunciation, and the acquisition of skills in reading and writing Chinese characters. 
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: DiscussSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-11:45 AM / REMOTE

    An intensive introduction to spoken Mandarin and modern written Chinese, presenting basic elements of grammar, sentence structures and active mastery of the most commonly used Chinese characters. Emphasis on development of oral/aural proficiency, pronunciation, and the acquisition of skills in reading and writing Chinese characters. 
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: DiscussSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 12:30 PM-1:20 PM / REMOTE

    An intensive introduction to spoken Mandarin and modern written Chinese, presenting basic elements of grammar, sentence structures and active mastery of the most commonly used Chinese characters. Emphasis on development of oral/aural proficiency, pronunciation, and the acquisition of skills in reading and writing Chinese characters. 
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: DiscussSection Enrollment: 8
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 8:10 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    An intensive introduction to spoken Mandarin and modern written Chinese, presenting basic elements of grammar, sentence structures and active mastery of the most commonly used Chinese characters. Emphasis on development of oral/aural proficiency, pronunciation, and the acquisition of skills in reading and writing Chinese characters. 
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 10:55 AM-11:45 AM / REMOTE

    Continued emphasis on the development of oral proficiency and functional literacy in modern Mandarin. Conversation and narrative practice, reading exercises, short composition assignments, and work with audio-visual materials. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor. {F}
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 8:10 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    Continued emphasis on the development of oral proficiency and functional literacy in modern Mandarin. Conversation and narrative practice, reading exercises, short composition assignments, and work with audio-visual materials. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor. {F}
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: DiscussSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-11:45 AM / REMOTE

    Continued emphasis on the development of oral proficiency and functional literacy in modern Mandarin. Conversation and narrative practice, reading exercises, short composition assignments, and work with audio-visual materials. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor. {F}
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: DiscussSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 8:10 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    Continued emphasis on the development of oral proficiency and functional literacy in modern Mandarin. Conversation and narrative practice, reading exercises, short composition assignments, and work with audio-visual materials. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor. {F}
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 6
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    Building on the skills and vocabulary acquired in Chinese II, students learn to read simple essays on topics of common interest and develop the ability to understand, summarize and discuss social issues in contemporary China. Readings are supplemented by audio-visual materials. Prerequisite: CHI 221 or permission of the instructor. {F}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:10 AM / REMOTE

    Development of advanced proficiency in four skills through the study and discussion of selected modern Chinese literary and cinematic texts. Students explore literary expression in original works of fiction, including short stories, essays, novellas and excerpts of novels as well as screenplays. Prerequisite: CHI 302 or permission of the instructor. With the instructor’s permission, advanced language courses may be repeated when the content changes. {F}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 8
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    China grounds its literary tradition in lyric poetry. One enduring definition of lyric, or shi, in the Chinese tradition is the natural, direct expression and reflection of one’s inner spirit as a result of a unique encounter with the world. This course is an introduction to masterworks of the Chinese lyric tradition from its oral beginnings through the Qing dynasty. Through close, careful readings of folk songs, poems, prose, and excerpts from the novel Dream of the Red Chamber, students inquire into how the spiritual, philosophical and political concerns dominating the poets’ milieu shaped the lyric language through the ages. All readings are in English translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. {L}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 17
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    A survey of Japanese literature from the late 19th century to the present. Over the last century and a half, Japan has undergone tremendous change: rapid industrialization, imperial and colonial expansion, occupation following its defeat in the Pacific War, and emergence as a global economic power. The literature of modern Japan reflects the complex aesthetic, cultural and political effects of such changes. Through our discussions of these texts, we also address theoretical questions about such concepts as identity, gender, race, sexuality, nation, class, colonialism, modernism and translation. All readings are in English translation. {L}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 24
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    This course offers a survey of Korean film history in light of cinema's relationship to the masses. As a popular art form, cinema has always been in close contact with its audiences. Cinema has contributed to the emergence of modern masses. By examining how cinema has shaped its audiences and vice versa, this course will chart the development of Korean cinema as a popular entertainment as well as an art form during the last hundred years. Our journey will start from the globalization of Korean cinema and its transnational audiences and chronologically hark back to the colonial period. {H}{L}
    Linked Course: No
    FMS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Do you like love stories? Kung fu movies? Feel embarrassed admitting it and wonder why? This course investigates the cultural, political and aesthetic significance of romance and martial arts in Chinese popular fiction and some films from the 16th to the 20th centuries. Students will read works in these two major genres, learn key frameworks from cultural studies, and explore scholarship on the aesthetic and political interventions of Chinese romantic and martial arts fiction in local, national and global contexts. Students will end the course as more knowledgeable, aware consumers of popular culture in general. {L}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 8:10 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    An introduction to spoken and written Japanese. Emphasis on the development of basic oral proficiency, along with reading and writing skills. Students acquire knowledge of basic grammatical patterns, strategies in daily communication, hiragana, katakana and about 90 Kanji. Designed for students with no background in Japanese. 
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:10 AM / REMOTE

    An introduction to spoken and written Japanese. Emphasis on the development of basic oral proficiency, along with reading and writing skills. Students acquire knowledge of basic grammatical patterns, strategies in daily communication, hiragana, katakana and about 90 Kanji. Designed for students with no background in Japanese. 
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: DiscussSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 8:10 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    An introduction to spoken and written Japanese. Emphasis on the development of basic oral proficiency, along with reading and writing skills. Students acquire knowledge of basic grammatical patterns, strategies in daily communication, hiragana, katakana and about 90 Kanji. Designed for students with no background in Japanese. 
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: DiscussSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:10 AM / REMOTE

    An introduction to spoken and written Japanese. Emphasis on the development of basic oral proficiency, along with reading and writing skills. Students acquire knowledge of basic grammatical patterns, strategies in daily communication, hiragana, katakana and about 90 Kanji. Designed for students with no background in Japanese. 
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 14
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 8:10 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    Course focuses on further development of oral proficiency, along with reading and writing skills. Students attain intermediate proficiency while deepening their understanding of the social and cultural context of the language. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor. {F}
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: DiscussSection Enrollment: 14
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 8:10 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    Course focuses on further development of oral proficiency, along with reading and writing skills. Students attain intermediate proficiency while deepening their understanding of the social and cultural context of the language. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor. {F}
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 10
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Development of high intermediate proficiency in speech and reading through study of varied prose pieces and audio-visual materials. Prerequisite: 221 or permission of the instructor. {F}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 8
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 7:05 PM-8:20 PM / REMOTE

    This course focuses on contemporary texts from different genres including newspaper and magazine articles, fiction, and short essays, from print and electronic media. This course further develops advanced reading, writing and discussion skills in Japanese and enhances students’ understanding of various aspects of contemporary Japanese society. Students work on group and individual projects such as translation of a text from Japanese to English. Prerequisite: JPN 302 or permission of the instructor. With the instructor’s permission, advanced language courses may be repeated when the content changes. {F}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 14
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:10 AM / REMOTE

    Beginning Korean I is the first half of a two-semester introductory course in spoken and written Korean for students who do not have any previous knowledge of Korean. This course improves students’ communicative competence in daily life, focusing on the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Some of the activities include oral dialogue journals (ODJ), expanding knowledge of vocabulary, conversation in authentic contexts, in-depth study of grammar, listening comprehension, pronunciation practice, mini- presentations, Korean film reviews and Korean film making. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 11
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 10:55 AM-11:45 AM / REMOTE

    Beginning Korean I is the first half of a two-semester introductory course in spoken and written Korean for students who do not have any previous knowledge of Korean. This course improves students’ communicative competence in daily life, focusing on the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Some of the activities include oral dialogue journals (ODJ), expanding knowledge of vocabulary, conversation in authentic contexts, in-depth study of grammar, listening comprehension, pronunciation practice, mini- presentations, Korean film reviews and Korean film making. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 8:10 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    Beginning Korean I is the first half of a two-semester introductory course in spoken and written Korean for students who do not have any previous knowledge of Korean. This course improves students’ communicative competence in daily life, focusing on the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Some of the activities include oral dialogue journals (ODJ), expanding knowledge of vocabulary, conversation in authentic contexts, in-depth study of grammar, listening comprehension, pronunciation practice, mini- presentations, Korean film reviews and Korean film making. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 12
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:10 AM / REMOTE

    Intermediate Korean I is the first half of a two-semester intermediate course in spoken and written Korean for students who already have a basic knowledge of Korean. This course reinforces and increases students’ facility with Korean in the four language areas: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Students are encouraged to expand their knowledge and take confidence-inspiring risks through such activities as expanding knowledge of vocabulary, role play in authentic contexts, in-depth study of grammar, students mini-presentations, various types of writing, Korean film reviews, skits and Korean film making. Prerequisite: KOR 102 or permission of the instructor. {F}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 8
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This course helps students become proficient in reading, writing and speaking at an advanced level of Korean. This course is particularly appropriate for Korean heritage language learners, that is, those who have some listening and speaking proficiency but lack solid reading and writing skills in Korean. In addition, this course would fortify and greatly expand the skills of those who have studied Korean through the intermediate level or who have equivalent language competence in Korean. Class activities include (1) reading of Korean literature and current news sources; (2) writing assignments such as Korean-film responses, journal entries and letters; (3) expanding vocabulary knowledge; (4) practicing translation skills; (5) understanding Korean idioms; (6) learning basic Chinese characters. Prerequisite: KOR 202 or permission of the instructor. {F}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 40
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    How and how well do markets work? What should government do in a market economy? How do markets set prices, determine what is produced and decide who gets the goods? We consider important economic issues including preserving the environment, free trade, taxation, (de)regulation and poverty. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 40
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 21
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    How and how well do markets work? What should government do in a market economy? How do markets set prices, determine what is produced and decide who gets the goods? We consider important economic issues including preserving the environment, free trade, taxation, (de)regulation and poverty. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 40
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:10 AM / REMOTE

    An examination of current macroeconomic policy issues, including the short and long-run effects of budget deficits, the determinants of economic growth, causes and effects of inflation, and the effects of high trade deficits. The course focuses on what, if any, government (monetary and fiscal) policies should be pursued in order to achieve low inflation, full employment, high economic growth and rising real wages. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 40
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 17
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    An examination of current macroeconomic policy issues, including the short and long-run effects of budget deficits, the determinants of economic growth, causes and effects of inflation, and the effects of high trade deficits. The course focuses on what, if any, government (monetary and fiscal) policies should be pursued in order to achieve low inflation, full employment, high economic growth and rising real wages. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 40
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 21
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    An examination of current macroeconomic policy issues, including the short and long-run effects of budget deficits, the determinants of economic growth, causes and effects of inflation, and the effects of high trade deficits. The course focuses on what, if any, government (monetary and fiscal) policies should be pursued in order to achieve low inflation, full employment, high economic growth and rising real wages. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 55
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 23
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 7:45 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    Summarizing, interpreting and analyzing empirical data. Attention to descriptive statistics and statistical inference. Topics include elementary sampling, probability, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing and regression. Assignments include use of statistical software to analyze labor market and other economic data. Prerequisite: ECO 150 or ECO 153. Students are not given credit for both ECO 220 and any of the following courses: GOV 203, SOC 201, MTH 201, PSY 201, MTH/SDS 220. Course limited to 55 students. {M}{S}
    Linked Course: Yes
    ENV Crosslist, SDS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 27
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 11
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 7:45 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    Summarizing, interpreting and analyzing empirical data. Attention to descriptive statistics and statistical inference. Topics include elementary sampling, probability, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing and regression. Assignments include use of statistical software to analyze labor market and other economic data. Prerequisite: ECO 150 or ECO 153. Students are not given credit for both ECO 220 and any of the following courses: GOV 203, SOC 201, MTH 201, PSY 201, MTH/SDS 220. Course limited to 55 students. {M}{S}
    Linked Course: Yes
    ENV Crosslist, SDS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 28
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 12
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 7:05 PM-8:20 PM / REMOTE

    Summarizing, interpreting and analyzing empirical data. Attention to descriptive statistics and statistical inference. Topics include elementary sampling, probability, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing and regression. Assignments include use of statistical software to analyze labor market and other economic data. Prerequisite: ECO 150 or ECO 153. Students are not given credit for both ECO 220 and any of the following courses: GOV 203, SOC 201, MTH 201, PSY 201, MTH/SDS 220. Course limited to 55 students. {M}{S}
    Linked Course: Yes
    ENV Crosslist, SDS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    An analysis of selected microeconomic and macroeconomic issues about which our two political parties disagree. Specific issues include health care; Social Security and other entitlement programs; taxes, government spending and budget deficits; immigration; and the role of government in the economy. Prerequisites: ECO 150, ECO 153 and ECO 220 or its equivalent. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    PPL Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 19
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    An examination of the global dynamics and determinants of inequality in income and wealth and its interplay with economic growth, from antiquity to the present. Beginning with an overview of growth at the country level, the course moves to examine the division of income between labor and capital, inequality in capital ownership, and inequality in labor earnings, ending with a discussion of policy proposals to address increasing inequality. Topics covered include the labor share, the concentration of wealth at the top, the skill premium, intergenerational mobility, managerial compensation, the racial and gender wage gaps, and offshore tax evasion. Prerequisite: ECO 150 or 153, or the equivalent. (E) {S}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 21
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    Applied regression analysis. The specification and estimation of economic models, hypothesis testing, statistical significance, interpretation of results, policy implications. Emphasis on practical applications and cross-section data analysis. Prerequisites: ECO 150, ECO 153, MTH 111 and either ECO 220, MTH/SDS 220 or MTH/SDS 291. {M}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    SDS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 23
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Applied regression analysis. The specification and estimation of economic models, hypothesis testing, statistical significance, interpretation of results, policy implications. Emphasis on practical applications and cross-section data analysis. Prerequisites: ECO 150, ECO 153, MTH 111 and either ECO 220, MTH/SDS 220 or MTH/SDS 291. {M}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    SDS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 55
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 30
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Focuses on the economic analysis of resource allocation in a market economy and on the economic impact of various government interventions, such as minimum wage laws, national health insurance and environmental regulations. Covers the theories of consumer choice and decision making by the firm. Examines the welfare implications of a market economy, and of federal and state policies which influence market choices. Prerequisites: ECO 150 and MTH 111 or its equivalent. Enrollment limited to 55 students. {S}
    Linked Course: Yes
    Enforced Prereq(s): ECO 150 AND MTH 111
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: DiscussSection Enrollment: 19
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M 1:40 PM-2:30 PM / REMOTE

    Focuses on the economic analysis of resource allocation in a market economy and on the economic impact of various government interventions, such as minimum wage laws, national health insurance and environmental regulations. Covers the theories of consumer choice and decision making by the firm. Examines the welfare implications of a market economy, and of federal and state policies which influence market choices. Prerequisites: ECO 150 and MTH 111 or its equivalent. Enrollment limited to 55 students. {S}
    Linked Course: Yes
    Enforced Prereq(s): ECO 150 AND MTH 111
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: DiscussSection Enrollment: 11
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 3:15 PM-4:05 PM / REMOTE

    Focuses on the economic analysis of resource allocation in a market economy and on the economic impact of various government interventions, such as minimum wage laws, national health insurance and environmental regulations. Covers the theories of consumer choice and decision making by the firm. Examines the welfare implications of a market economy, and of federal and state policies which influence market choices. Prerequisites: ECO 150 and MTH 111 or its equivalent. Enrollment limited to 55 students. {S}
    Linked Course: Yes
    Enforced Prereq(s): ECO 150 AND MTH 111
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 55
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 20
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    Builds a cohesive theoretical framework within which to analyze the workings of the macroeconomy. Current issues relating to key macroeconomic variables such as output, inflation and unemployment are examined within this framework. The role of government policy, both in the short run and the long run, is also assessed. Prerequisites: ECO 153 and MTH 111 or its equivalent. Enrollment limited to 55 students. {S}
    Linked Course: Yes
    Enforced Prereq(s): ECO 153
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 27
    Course Type: DiscussSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 9:20 AM-10:10 AM / REMOTE

    Builds a cohesive theoretical framework within which to analyze the workings of the macroeconomy. Current issues relating to key macroeconomic variables such as output, inflation and unemployment are examined within this framework. The role of government policy, both in the short run and the long run, is also assessed. Prerequisites: ECO 153 and MTH 111 or its equivalent. Enrollment limited to 55 students. {S}
    Linked Course: Yes
    Enforced Prereq(s): ECO 153
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 28
    Course Type: DiscussSection Enrollment: 11
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 10:55 AM-11:45 AM / REMOTE

    Builds a cohesive theoretical framework within which to analyze the workings of the macroeconomy. Current issues relating to key macroeconomic variables such as output, inflation and unemployment are examined within this framework. The role of government policy, both in the short run and the long run, is also assessed. Prerequisites: ECO 153 and MTH 111 or its equivalent. Enrollment limited to 55 students. {S}
    Linked Course: Yes
    Enforced Prereq(s): ECO 153
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 22
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    An investigation of the economic foundations for investment, financing and related decisions in the business corporation. Basic concerns and responsibilities of the financial manager, and the methods of analysis employed by them are emphasized. This course offers a balanced discussion of practical as well as theoretical developments in the field of financial economics. Prerequisites: ECO 250, ECO 220 and MTH 111. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 20
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / SEELYE 312

    An economic analysis of legal rules and cases. Topics include property law, contract law, accident law, criminal law, the Coase theorem and the economics of litigation. Prerequisite: ECO 250. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): ECO 250
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 11
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    An introduction to the research workflow in economics. Drawing on examples from a variety of economic fields, students will learn how to search, read, and write about the economic literature and to generate reproducible economic data analysis using statistical software like R and Stata. The course focuses on the practical skills needed to apply the tools from economic theory and econometric methods to real economic research questions.Prerequisite: one of ECO 220, ECO 240, MTH/SDS 220, or MTH/SDS 291 and one of ECO 250 or ECO 253. (E) {S}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): ECO 220 OR MTH 220 OR SDS 220 OR ECO 240 OR MTH 291 OR SDS 291 AND (ECO 250 OR ECO 253)
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 39
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 8:10 AM-9:00 AM / SEELYE 312

    An examination of the trading relationships among countries and of the flows of factors of production throughout the world economy. Beginning with the theories of international trade, this course moves on to examine various policy issues in the international economy, including commercial policy, protectionism and the distribution of the gains from trade, multilateral trade negotiations, preferential trade agreements, the impact of transnational firms and globalization, immigration, and trade and economic development. Prerequisite: ECO 150. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): ECO 150
    GSD Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 10
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    Topics course. 

    This seminar applies and extends microeconomic theory to analyze selected topics related to the India’s economic development. Throughout the course an emphasis is placed on empirically testing economic hypotheses using data from India. In particular, the following topics are explored, with reference to India’s growth and development: education, health, demographics, caste and gender, institutions, credit, insurance, infrastructure, water and climate change. Topics and assignments may be changed in response to the class’s particular interests. Prerequisites: ECO 220 and 250. Recommended: ECO 211 or 213. {S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    SAS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 14
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 9:20 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    What role do central banks play in the management of short-run economic fluctuations? What has driven the recent global trend towards more powerful and independent central-banking institutions? This course explores the theoretical foundations that link central bank policy to real economic activity. Building on this theoretical background, the monetary policy frameworks and operating procedures of key central banks are then examined. Much of the analysis focuses on the current practices of the U.S. Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank, with a view to identifying the relative strengths and weaknesses of the two institutions. Prerequisite: ECO 220, ECO 253 and a course in either international finance or money and banking such as ECO 275 or ECO 296. {S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    Enforced Prereq(s): ECO 220 AND ECO 253
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 35
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 32
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    This course explores how the challenges facing schools in America’s cities are entwined with social, economic and political conditions present within the urban environment. Our essential question: How have urban educators and policy makers attempted to provide a quality educational experience for youth when issues associated with their social environment often present significant obstacles to teaching and learning? Using relevant social theory to guide our analyses, we investigate school reform efforts at the macro-level by looking at policy-driven initiatives such as high stakes testing, vouchers and privatization, and at the local level by exploring the work of teachers, parents, youth workers and reformers. Fieldwork opportunities are available for students. Enrollment limited to 35. 
    Linked Course: No
    URS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 35
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    Knowledge of linguistics is a valuable tool for educators. Understanding the linguistic underpinnings of language, variation between spoken and written language, and sociolinguistic variation that exists in the classroom is beneficial in teaching reading and writing to all students and in understanding classroom discourse. Knowing how language works allows educators to recognize the linguistic issues they may encounter, including delays in reading; the effects of multilingualism on writing, speaking, and reading; and differences due to dialectical variation. This course provides a basic understanding of linguistic concepts, how written and spoken language interact and vary, and sociolinguistic variation in the classroom. (Can also count for the International/Global Education Strand) {S}
    Linked Course: No
    LNG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 35
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 21
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    A study of the American secondary and middle school as a changing social institution. Provides an analysis of the history and sociology of this institution, modern school reform, curriculum development and contemporary problems of secondary education. This course includes a weekly service learning commitment. Enrollment limited to 35. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 29
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    This course combines perspectives on cognition and learning to examine the teaching-learning process in educational settings. In addition to cognitive factors, the course incorporates contextual factors, such as classroom structure, teacher belief systems, peer relationships and educational policy. Consideration of the teaching-learning process highlights subject matter instruction and assessment. Prerequisite: a genuine interest in better understanding teaching and learning. Priority given to majors, minors, first-year students and sophomores. Enrollment limited to 30. {N}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    BIO Crosslist, MUX Crosslist, PSY Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 6
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    This course serves as an introduction to the theories, strategies and techniques that form the bases for assessing learning in classrooms. The focus is on the assumptions, strengths and weaknesses associated with various approaches. Students encounter a variety of instruments and methods used for summative and formative evaluations of student comprehension, learning needs, and academic progress. Students also develop authentic assessment tools as they work through evaluation problems associated with particular curriculum programs and instructional techniques. This course has a community-based project that requires a regular out-of-class time commitment and a final group presentation for a professional learning community of Smith College Campus School teachers and staff. Enrollment limited to 20. {S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 8
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M 3:15 PM-5:45 PM / REMOTE

    Topics course. 

    Students will be provided an introduction to educational research methods through two main activities in this weekly seminar: They will (1) discuss texts pertaining to analytical approaches and theoretical models in educational research inspired by constructivist and sociocultural theories, and (2) participate in research projects guided by Campus School teachers’ inquiries about learning. Students will be paired with teachers as research teams and regularly engage in providing and receiving feedback on their collaborative projects. Student research teams will support their teacher collaborators by constructing research plans, and observing, documenting, analyzing, and reporting on aspects of classroom learning throughout the semester. 
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    URS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 12
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W F 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    This course examines teaching and learning issues related to the reading process in the elementary classroom. Students develop a theoretical knowledge base for the teaching of reading to guide their instructional decisions and practices in the classroom setting. Understanding what constitutes a balanced reading program for all children is a goal of the course. Students spend additional hours engaged in classroom observations, study-group discussions, and field-based experiences. Prerequisite: 238. Open to juniors, seniors and graduate students only, with permission. {S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to graduates,juniors and seniors
    BKX Crosslist, LNG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 35
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    This course examines the multicultural approach in education, its roots in social protest movements and its role in educational reform. The course aims to develop an understanding of the key concepts, developments and controversies in the field of multicultural education; cultivate sensitivity to the experiences of diverse people in American society; explore alternative approaches for working with diverse students and their families; and develop a sound philosophical and pedagogical rationale for a multicultural education. This course has a community-based learning requirement. (Can also count for the International/Global Education Strand) Enrollment limited to 35. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 3:15 PM-5:45 PM / REMOTE

    A study of the elementary school curriculum, and the application of the principles of teaching in the elementary school. Two class hours and a practicum involving directed classroom teaching. Prerequisite: three courses in the department taken previously, including 235 and 238; grade of B- or better in education courses. Admission by permission of the department. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 3:15 PM-5:45 PM / REMOTE

    Examination of individual differences and their consideration in the teaching-learning process.This course requires weekly fieldwork in classrooms supporting individual learners. Prerequisites: EDC 238. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    BIO Crosslist, MUX Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M 7:05 PM-9:35 PM / REMOTE

    Examining subject matter from the standpoint of pedagogical content knowledge. The course includes methods of planning, teaching and assessment appropriate to the grade level and subject-matter area. Content frameworks and standards serve as the organizing themes for the course. Admission by permission of the department. Preregistration meeting scheduled in April. 
    Linked Course: No
    BIO Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 10
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 3:15 PM-5:45 PM / REMOTE

    An examination of diversity in learning and background variables, and their consideration in promoting educational equity. Also, a look at special needs as factors in classroom teaching and student learning. Research and pre-practicum required. {S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to graduates
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M 3:15 PM-5:45 PM / REMOTE

    This course examines current theoretical perspectives about learning and teaching that are emerging from the learning sciences. Central to these theories are ideas about how people learn, both independently and in groups, in ways that facilitate critical thinking and the development of meaningful knowledge. Theories are applied to the design of curriculum, instruction and assessment. Open to seniors by permission of the instructor. 
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to graduates
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 18
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    EGR 100 serves as an accessible course for all students, regardless of background or intent to major in engineering. Students develop a sound understanding of the engineering design process, including problem definition, background research, identification of design criteria, development of metrics and methods for evaluating alternative designs, prototype development, and proof of concept testing. Working in teams, students present their ideas through oral and written reports. Reading assignments and in-class discussions challenge students to critically analyze contemporary issues related to the interaction of technology and society. Organized around different themes, multiple sections. Engineering majors are required to take this course. Those students considering majoring in engineering are strongly encouraged to take EGR 100 during their first year. Enrollment limited to 20. 

    Through readings, discussion, labs, and lectures students learn about human activity related to energy usage and the consequences to Earth’s environment. This knowledge is applied to motivate, design and build scale models of net-zero energy buildings. Through simple lab exercises, students learn to program microcontrollers that measure temperatures and control features within their model buildings, and corresponding analyses enable students to demonstrate how energy from the sun can be utilized in design to reduce carbon-based energy sources. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    ATC Crosslist, ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 22
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    EGR 100 serves as an accessible course for all students, regardless of background or intent to major in engineering. Students develop a sound understanding of the engineering design process, including problem definition, background research, identification of design criteria, development of metrics and methods for evaluating alternative designs, prototype development, and proof of concept testing. Working in teams, students present their ideas through oral and written reports. Reading assignments and in-class discussions challenge students to critically analyze contemporary issues related to the interaction of technology and society. Organized around different themes, multiple sections. Engineering majors are required to take this course. Those students considering majoring in engineering are strongly encouraged to take EGR 100 during their first year. Enrollment limited to 20. 

    Through readings, discussion, labs, and lectures students learn about human activity related to energy usage and the consequences to Earth’s environment. This knowledge is applied to motivate, design and build scale models of net-zero energy buildings. Through simple lab exercises, students learn to program microcontrollers that measure temperatures and control features within their model buildings, and corresponding analyses enable students to demonstrate how energy from the sun can be utilized in design to reduce carbon-based energy sources. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    ATC Crosslist, ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 19
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    EGR 100 serves as an accessible course for all students, regardless of background or intent to major in engineering. Students develop a sound understanding of the engineering design process, including problem definition, background research, identification of design criteria, development of metrics and methods for evaluating alternative designs, prototype development, and proof of concept testing. Working in teams, students present their ideas through oral and written reports. Reading assignments and in-class discussions challenge students to critically analyze contemporary issues related to the interaction of technology and society. Organized around different themes, multiple sections. Engineering majors are required to take this course. Those students considering majoring in engineering are strongly encouraged to take EGR 100 during their first year. Enrollment limited to 20. 

    We investigate and design water resources infrastructure – for hydropower, water supply, wastewater treatment, stormwater management, and irrigation. Those technologies are introduced through historical and contemporary examples, along with a theme of the importance of place in engineering design. In contrast to design as invention, this course puts the emphasis on the adaptation of common designs to particular places, as influenced by climate, physical geography, culture, history, economics, politics, and legal frameworks. Examples include the historic Mill River, Northampton’s water resources, Boston’s Deer Island wastewater treatment facility, San Francisco’s water supply system, California’s State Water Project and the Bay-Delta system, the Colorado River, and water recycling and reclamation. {N}
    Linked Course: Yes
    ATC Crosslist, ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 19
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    EGR 100 serves as an accessible course for all students, regardless of background or intent to major in engineering. Students develop a sound understanding of the engineering design process, including problem definition, background research, identification of design criteria, development of metrics and methods for evaluating alternative designs, prototype development, and proof of concept testing. Working in teams, students present their ideas through oral and written reports. Reading assignments and in-class discussions challenge students to critically analyze contemporary issues related to the interaction of technology and society. Organized around different themes, multiple sections. Engineering majors are required to take this course. Those students considering majoring in engineering are strongly encouraged to take EGR 100 during their first year. Enrollment limited to 20. 

    Lab section. We investigate and design water resources infrastructure – for hydropower, water supply, wastewater treatment, stormwater management, and irrigation. Those technologies are introduced through historical and contemporary examples, along with a theme of the importance of place in engineering design. In contrast to design as invention, this course puts the emphasis on the adaptation of common designs to particular places, as influenced by climate, physical geography, culture, history, economics, politics, and legal frameworks. Examples include the historic Mill River, Northampton’s water resources, Boston’s Deer Island wastewater treatment facility, San Francisco’s water supply system, California’s State Water Project and the Bay-Delta system, the Colorado River, and water recycling and reclamation. {N}
    Linked Course: Yes
    ATC Crosslist, ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 19
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Perm of Program-Waiver ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    This course introduces the basic theoretical concepts, procedures and methodologies needed to understand the mechanical behavior of objects in static equilibrium. Topics to be covered include 2d and 3d particle and rigid body equilibrium; analysis of frames, trusses, beams and machines; centroids; distributed loading; moment of inertia; internal forces and moments; and an introduction to stress and strain. In addition to developing competence in applying standard problem-solving procedures, students will also apply their understanding in real world contexts. Prerequisites: PHY 117 and MTH 112 (or the equivalent). Required laboratory taken once a week. Enrollment limited to 20. {N}
    Linked Course: YesRestriction(s): Limited to EGN and EGR majors
    Enforced Prereq(s): MTH 112 AND (PHY 117 OR PHY 119)
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 14
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Perm of Program-Waiver ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    This course introduces the basic theoretical concepts, procedures and methodologies needed to understand the mechanical behavior of objects in static equilibrium. Topics to be covered include 2d and 3d particle and rigid body equilibrium; analysis of frames, trusses, beams and machines; centroids; distributed loading; moment of inertia; internal forces and moments; and an introduction to stress and strain. In addition to developing competence in applying standard problem-solving procedures, students will also apply their understanding in real world contexts. Prerequisites: PHY 117 and MTH 112 (or the equivalent). Required laboratory taken once a week. Enrollment limited to 20. {N}
    Linked Course: YesRestriction(s): Limited to EGN and EGR majors
    Enforced Prereq(s): MTH 112 AND (PHY 117 OR PHY 119)
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 19
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Perm of Program-Waiver ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This course introduces the basic theoretical concepts, procedures and methodologies needed to understand the mechanical behavior of objects in static equilibrium. Topics to be covered include 2d and 3d particle and rigid body equilibrium; analysis of frames, trusses, beams and machines; centroids; distributed loading; moment of inertia; internal forces and moments; and an introduction to stress and strain. In addition to developing competence in applying standard problem-solving procedures, students will also apply their understanding in real world contexts. Prerequisites: PHY 117 and MTH 112 (or the equivalent). Required laboratory taken once a week. Enrollment limited to 20. {N}
    Linked Course: YesRestriction(s): Limited to EGN and EGR majors
    Enforced Prereq(s): MTH 112 AND (PHY 117 OR PHY 119)
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 14
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Perm of Program-Waiver ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This course introduces the basic theoretical concepts, procedures and methodologies needed to understand the mechanical behavior of objects in static equilibrium. Topics to be covered include 2d and 3d particle and rigid body equilibrium; analysis of frames, trusses, beams and machines; centroids; distributed loading; moment of inertia; internal forces and moments; and an introduction to stress and strain. In addition to developing competence in applying standard problem-solving procedures, students will also apply their understanding in real world contexts. Prerequisites: PHY 117 and MTH 112 (or the equivalent). Required laboratory taken once a week. Enrollment limited to 20. {N}
    Linked Course: YesRestriction(s): Limited to EGN and EGR majors
    Enforced Prereq(s): MTH 112 AND (PHY 117 OR PHY 119)
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Perm of Program-Waiver ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Modern civilization relies profoundly on efficient production, management and consumption of energy. Thermodynamics is the science of energy transformations involving work, heat and the properties of matter. Engineers rely on thermodynamics to assess the feasibility of their designs in a wide variety of fields including chemical processing, pollution control and abatement, power generation, materials science, engine design, construction, refrigeration and microchip processing. Course topics include first and second laws of thermodynamics, power cycles; combustion and refrigeration; phase equilibria; ideal and nonideal mixtures, conductive, convective and radiative heat transfer. Prerequisite EGR 110, CHM 111 or 118; corequisite MTH 212. Enrollment limited to 20. {N}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to EGN and EGR majors
    Enforced Prereq(s): MTH 212 AND EGR 110 AND (CHM 111 OR CHM 118)
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 21
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Our electronic world relies on transistors, amplifiers, and other microelectronic circuits. This course introduces the principles required to analyze and design basic microelectronic circuits. Topics will include the device principles of diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and field effect transistors, the design of simple analog and digital circuits, and microelectronic circuit analysis using simulation software (SPICE). Prerequisite: EGR 220. {N}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    Enforced Prereq(s): EGR 220
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Wind and solar energy? Power generation from coal and nuclear fuel? What are our options for maintaining the high standard of living we expect, and also for electrifying developing regions? How can we make our energy use less damaging to our environment? This seminar introduces students to the field of electric power, from energy sources, generating technologies (renewable, hydro, nuclear and fossil), electricity transmission and ultimate end-use by us. Topics include analysis and simulation of power systems, discussions of emerging smart grid technologies (home automation), as well as policy, environmental and societal aspects of energy use. A short project allows students to select and explore individual technologies or a small power system in more depth. Prerequisite EGR 220. Enrollment limited to 12. {N}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to EGN and EGR majors AND Not open to first-years and sophomores
    Enforced Prereq(s): EGR 220
    ENV Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    There are countless challenges in medicine that engineering can help to address, from the molecular scale to the level of the entire human body. This course introduces students to engineering problem solving approaches to explore important biomedical questions. We integrate our learning of underlying biological systems with developing engineering thinking to examine those systems. We use mathematical tools to interpret and model the behavior of various biological phenomena. Upon completion of this course, students are able to identify open medical needs and propose ways in which engineering can contribute to understanding and meeting those needs. Prerequisites: PHY 210 or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. 
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to EGN and EGR majors AND Not open to first-years and sophomores
    Enforced Prereq(s): PHY 210
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 17
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Perm of Program-Waiver ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    This is the second course in a two-semester sequence designed to introduce students to fundamental theoretical principles and analysis of mechanics of continuous media, including solids and fluids. Concepts and topics to be covered in this course include intensive and extensive thermophysical properties of fluids; control-volume and differential expressions for conservation of mass, momentum and energy; dimensional analysis; and an introduction to additional topics such as aerodynamics, open-channel flow, and the use of fluid mechanics in the design process. Required concurrent laboratory. Prerequisites: EGR 270 and MTH 212. Enrollment limited to 20. {N}
    Linked Course: YesRestriction(s): Limited to EGN and EGR majors
    Enforced Prereq(s): EGR 270 AND MTH 212
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 10
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 11
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Perm of Program-Waiver ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This is the second course in a two-semester sequence designed to introduce students to fundamental theoretical principles and analysis of mechanics of continuous media, including solids and fluids. Concepts and topics to be covered in this course include intensive and extensive thermophysical properties of fluids; control-volume and differential expressions for conservation of mass, momentum and energy; dimensional analysis; and an introduction to additional topics such as aerodynamics, open-channel flow, and the use of fluid mechanics in the design process. Required concurrent laboratory. Prerequisites: EGR 270 and MTH 212. Enrollment limited to 20. {N}
    Linked Course: YesRestriction(s): Limited to EGN and EGR majors
    Enforced Prereq(s): EGR 270 AND MTH 212
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 10
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 6
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Perm of Program-Waiver ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This is the second course in a two-semester sequence designed to introduce students to fundamental theoretical principles and analysis of mechanics of continuous media, including solids and fluids. Concepts and topics to be covered in this course include intensive and extensive thermophysical properties of fluids; control-volume and differential expressions for conservation of mass, momentum and energy; dimensional analysis; and an introduction to additional topics such as aerodynamics, open-channel flow, and the use of fluid mechanics in the design process. Required concurrent laboratory. Prerequisites: EGR 270 and MTH 212. Enrollment limited to 20. {N}
    Linked Course: YesRestriction(s): Limited to EGN and EGR majors
    Enforced Prereq(s): EGR 270 AND MTH 212
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 11
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    This seminar applies fundamental principles of thermodynamics, electrochemistry and semi-conductor physics to the design, modeling and analysis of renewable energy power systems. Concepts covered in this course include extraterrestrial radiation, solar geometry, atmospheric effects, polarization curve characteristics, system components and configurations, stand-alone and hybrid system design and load interactions. This course applies these theoretical concepts in a laboratory setting involving the design and testing of fuel cell and photovoltaic systems. Prerequisites: EGR 220; corequisite EGR 290. Enrollment limited to 12. {N}
    Linked Course: YesRestriction(s): Limited to EGN and EGR majors AND Not open to first-years and sophomores
    Enforced Prereq(s): EGR 220 AND (CHM 111 OR CHM 118) AND EGR 290
    ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 11
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This seminar applies fundamental principles of thermodynamics, electrochemistry and semi-conductor physics to the design, modeling and analysis of renewable energy power systems. Concepts covered in this course include extraterrestrial radiation, solar geometry, atmospheric effects, polarization curve characteristics, system components and configurations, stand-alone and hybrid system design and load interactions. This course applies these theoretical concepts in a laboratory setting involving the design and testing of fuel cell and photovoltaic systems. Prerequisites: EGR 220; corequisite EGR 290. Enrollment limited to 12. {N}
    Linked Course: YesRestriction(s): Limited to EGN and EGR majors AND Not open to first-years and sophomores
    Enforced Prereq(s): EGR 220 AND (CHM 111 OR CHM 118) AND EGR 290
    ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    Advanced Topics in Engineering is designed as a technical depth course for engineering majors. Course topics can adapt to new technologies and opportunities and build on the engineering fundamentals developed through 100- and 200-level coursework. Permission of the instructor required. Not open to first-years and sophomores. 

    Computer simulations are an increasingly large part of engineering research and design, but how do we know if the results on the screen match reality? This course is an introduction to finite element methods for the analysis of solids, fluids, and heat transfer. Topics covered include the creation of 1D, 2D, and 3D models of engineering problems in COMSOL Multiphysics (a commercial engineering program), comparison of modeled results to laboratory measurements, and the evaluation of modeled results. An emphasis will be not only on the creation of computer models, but also on how to validate those models with real world data. Small projects and modeling homework assignments will lead to a more complex final project on a chosen topic of interest. Prerequisites: EGR 270, EGR 290, and ERG 374 or instructor permission. {N}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to EGN and EGR majors AND Not open to first-years and sophomores
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 35
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction F 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    This two-semester course focuses on the engineering design process and associated professional skills required for careers in engineering. Topics include a subset of the following: the engineering design process, project definition, design requirements, project management, concept generation, concept selection, engineering economics, design for sustainability, design for safety and risk reduction, design case studies, teamwork, effective presentations, professional ethics, networking, negotiation and intellectual property. This course is required of all senior engineering students pursuing the B.S. in engineering science and must be taken in conjunction with EGR 421D, EGR 422D, or EGR 431D. 
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to EGN and EGR majors AND Limited to seniors
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  • Credits: 3Max Enrollment: 36
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 31
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This two-semester course leverages students’ previous coursework to address an engineering design problem. Students collaborate in teams on real-world projects sponsored by industry and government. Regular team design meetings, weekly progress reports, interim and final reports, and multiple presentations are required. Prerequisites: Senior standing in engineering, EGR 100, EGR 220, 270, 290, 374 and at least one additional 300-level engineering course, or permission of instructor. This course requires an ability to work on open-ended problems in a team setting. Corequisite EGR 410D. Enrollment limited to 36. 
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to EGN and EGR majors AND Limited to seniors
    Coreq: EGR 410DEnforced Prereq(s): EGR 220 AND EGR 270 AND EGR 290 AND EGR 374 AND EGR 100
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 59
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 7:30 PM-9:00 PM / REMOTE

    This course offers the opportunity to read contemporary poetry and meet the poets who write it. The course consists of class meetings alternating with public poetry readings by visiting poets. On five selected Tuesdays, the course also includes Tuesday Q& As with the poets, which meet from 4–5 p.m. Students with class, lab or required work conflicts are excused from Q& As. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only. Course may be repeated. {L}
    Linked Course: No
    PYX Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    In sections limited to 15 students each, this course primarily provides systematic instruction and practice in reading and writing academic prose, with emphasis on argumentation. The course also provides instruction and practice in conducting research and in public speaking. Particular sections of this course are designed to support nonnative speakers and bilinguals, who are strongly encouraged to consider those sections. Priority is given to incoming students in the fall-semester sections. Course may be repeated for credit with another instructor. 

    Nietzsche called maturity the rediscovered seriousness of a child at play. What is the meaning of comedy, in light of this “seriousness of the child at play?” Why do we laugh, at what and in what way? How do we distinguish silly comedy from serious comedy? This course examines such questions on comic platforms including film, music, videos, short stories and cartoons. We explore the “structure” of the comic moment as viewer or listener encounters surprise, transgression or enchantment, especially in 20th-century comedy, and the affectivity of the comic encounter from pure “clowning” to savage social commentary. Enrollment limited to 15.  WI
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    In sections limited to 15 students each, this course primarily provides systematic instruction and practice in reading and writing academic prose, with emphasis on argumentation. The course also provides instruction and practice in conducting research and in public speaking. Particular sections of this course are designed to support nonnative speakers and bilinguals, who are strongly encouraged to consider those sections. Priority is given to incoming students in the fall-semester sections. Course may be repeated for credit with another instructor. 

    How we speak – the words we choose, the way we structure our sentences, the pitch of our voices, even our gender while speaking – is constantly judged by those around us. Examining the interaction of gender and language leads to questions, such as how does gender shape the way we use language, how does our gender affect others’ perceptions of our speech (both written and verbal), what variation occurs across cultures with regards to gender and language? This course uses the topic of language and gender to expand upon and improve rhetorical and writing skills. Enrollment limit of 15. (E) This section is designed for students who are bilingual or speak a language other than English as their first language.  WI
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    In sections limited to 15 students each, this course primarily provides systematic instruction and practice in reading and writing academic prose, with emphasis on argumentation. The course also provides instruction and practice in conducting research and in public speaking. Particular sections of this course are designed to support nonnative speakers and bilinguals, who are strongly encouraged to consider those sections. Priority is given to incoming students in the fall-semester sections. Course may be repeated for credit with another instructor. 

    This class explores our contemporary “remix culture” to ask pressing questions about creativity, originality, and identity. We explore the remix as a necessary tool for cultural transformation and look at our own experience of race, gender, sexual orientation, class, and ability as an opportunity to reimagine and transform old ideas. We will make a case for the remix as a place for critical updates to our culture, and discuss the possibilities of how remixing contributes to a richer production of cultural ideas. Our work will combine academic writing with multimedia “remix” projects and class discussion.  WI
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 14
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 14
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This coursefamiliarizes students with key aspects of structure and form in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. We focus in turn on such elements of creative writing as imagery, diction, figurative language, character, setting, and plot. Students draft, workshop, and revise three pieces of writing over the course of the semester, one each in the genres of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Enrollment limited to 12. (E) {L}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 14
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    This coursefamiliarizes students with key aspects of structure and form in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. We focus in turn on such elements of creative writing as imagery, diction, figurative language, character, setting, and plot. Students draft, workshop, and revise three pieces of writing over the course of the semester, one each in the genres of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Enrollment limited to 12. (E) {L}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 14
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 12
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This coursefamiliarizes students with key aspects of structure and form in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. We focus in turn on such elements of creative writing as imagery, diction, figurative language, character, setting, and plot. Students draft, workshop, and revise three pieces of writing over the course of the semester, one each in the genres of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Enrollment limited to 12. (E) {L}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 7:05 PM-8:20 PM / REMOTE

    In this intellectually rigorous writing class, students will learn how to craft compelling “true stories,” using the journalist’s tools. They will research, report, write, revise, source, and share their work—and, through interviewing subjects firsthand, understand how other people see the world. We will consider multiple styles and mediums of journalism, including digital storytelling. Prerequisite: One WI course. Students should focus their attention and effort on academic exposition and argumentation before learning other forms of writing. Enrollment limit of 16.  
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 19
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    This course teaches the skills that enable us to read literature with understanding and pleasure. By studying examples from a variety of periods and places, students learn how poetry, prose fiction and drama work, how to interpret them and how to make use of interpretations by others. English 199 seeks to produce perceptive readers well equipped to take on complex texts. This gateway course for prospective English majors is not recommended for students simply seeking a writing intensive course. Readings in different sections vary, but all involve active discussion and frequent writing. Enrollment limited to 20. {L} WI
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 18
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    A study of the English literary tradition from the Middle Ages through the 18th century. Recommended for sophomores. Enrollment limited to 20. {L} WI
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 11
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    Same as CLT 202. Texts include The Iliad; tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides; Plato’s Symposium; Virgil’s Aeneid; Dante’s Divine Comedy. {L} WI
    Linked Course: No
    ANS Crosslist, CLS Crosslist, MED Crosslist, WLT Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 12
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Writing Sample RequiredReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    A writer’s workshop that focuses on sharpening and expanding each student’s fiction writing skills, as well as broadening and deepening her understanding of the short and long-form work. Exercises will concentrate on generative writing using a range of techniques to feed one's fictional imagination. Students will analyze and discuss each other's stories, and examine thewritings of established authors. Writing sample and permission of the instructor are required. Enrollment limited to 12. 

    This workshop will develop skills for developing a research-base for creative writing and balancing a writer's emotional and imaginative material with texts, expressions and artifacts from the outer world. We will examine how bringing fact and imagination together enriches the culture and sustains the writer, and how to develop a writing practice that will "go the distance" over a lifetime. Writing sample and permission of the instructor are required. Enrollment limited to 12. {A}{L}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 11
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    Same as HSC 207. An introductory exploration of the physical forms that knowledge and communication have taken in the West, from ancient oral cultures to modern print-literate culture. Our main interest is in discovering how what is said and thought in a culture reflects its available kinds of literacy and media of communication. Topics to include poetry and memory in oral cultures; the invention of writing; the invention of prose; literature and science in a script culture; the coming of printing; changing concepts of publication, authorship and originality; movements toward standardization in language; the fundamentally transformative effects of electronic communication. {L}
    Linked Course: No
    HSC Crosslist, LNG Crosslist, WLT Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    This course will focus on the extraordinary burst of literary creativity that coincided with the emergence of a new American nation. From its conflicted founding episodes to the crisis of the Civil War, American writers interpreted and criticized American life with unmatched imaginative intensity and formal boldness, taking as their particular subject both the promise of freedom implicit in the nation's invention—and the betrayals of that promise: in the horrors of slavery, and in the subtler entrapments of orthodox thinking, constricted vision, a self-poisoning psyche, and a repressive or unjust social life. {L}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 28
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    This course aims to identify, analyze, and complicate the dominant narrative of U.S. suburbia vis-à-vis the postwar American novel. While the suburb may evoke a shared sense of tedium, U.S. fiction positions suburbia as "contested terrain," a battleground staging many of the key social, cultural, and political shifts of our contemporary age. Reading novels and short stories by writers like Toni Morrison, Hisaye Yamamoto, John Updike, Chang-Rae Lee and Celeste Ng, we assess the narrative construction of the suburb as a bastion of white domesticity, as well as the disruption of this narrative through struggles for racial integration. Enrollment limited to 30. (E) {L}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 20
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    A study of England's first cosmopolitan poet whose Canterbury Tales offer a chorus of medieval literary voices, while creating a new kind of poetry anticipating modern attitudes and anxieties through colorful, complex characters like the Wife of Bath.Weread these tales closely in Chaucer's Middle English, an expressive idiom, ranging from the funny, sly and ribald to the thoughtful and profound. John Dryden called Chaucer the "father of English poesy," but if so, he was a good one. Later poets laughed with him, wept with him, and then did their own thing, just as he would have wanted. Not open to first year-students. {L}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years
    MED Crosslist, WLT Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Romeo and Juliet, Richard II, Hamlet, Twelfth Night, Troilus and Cressida, Othello, Antony and Cleopatra, The Winter’s Tale. Not open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 25. {L}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 68
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    This course has two central ambitions. First, it introduces themes of magic and witchcraft in (mostly) American literature and film. We work together to figure out how the figure of the witch functions in stories, novels and movies, what witches and witchcraft mean or how they participate in the texts’ ways of making meaning. At the same time, we try to figure out how witches and witchcraft function as loci or displacements of social anxiety—about power, science, gender, class, race and politics. Since the identification of witches and the fear of witchcraft often lead to witch panics, we finally examine the historical and cultural phenomenon of the witch hunt, including both the persecution of persons literally marked as witches and the analogous persecution of persons (Communists, sexual outsiders, etc.) figuratively “hunted” as witches have been. Open to students at all levels, regardless of major.  {L}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 8
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Writing Sample RequiredReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    A writer’s workshop designed to explore the complexities and delights of creative nonfiction. Constant reading, writing and critiquing. Writing sample andpermission of the instructor are required. Enrollment limited to 12. 

    This is a journalistic writing course using photography as a guide and tool. Students will take some photographs and do a lot of writing: blog posts, profiles, and full-length magazine-style reported articles. As we grapple with such literary issues as structure, metaphor, tone, voice, and pacing, we will let photography interrogate our writing. What can such pictorial concerns as focus, composition, point of view, breadth of frame and depth of field tell us? Course requires no prior photography experience or expertise. Applicants must submit a writing sample, an original piece or pieces totalling approx. 1000 words. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 8
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Writing Sample RequiredReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Taught by the Grace Hazard Conkling Poet in Residence, this advanced poetry workshop is for students who have developed a passionate relationship with poetry and who have substantial experience in writing poems. Texts are based on the poets who are reading at Smith during the semester, and students gain expertise in reading, writing and critiquing poems. Writing sample and permission of the instructor are required. Enrollment limited to 12. {A}{L}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 12
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Writing Sample RequiredReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M 7:05 PM-10:00 PM / REMOTE

    Thiscourse will help more advanced fiction writers improve their skills in a supportive workshop context, which encourages experimentation and attention to craft.We focus on technique, close reading, and the production of new work. Studentssubmit manuscripts for discussion, receive feedback from peers, and revise their work. They keep a process journal and practice mindfulness to cultivate powers of focus and observation. We readReading Like a Writer by Francine Prose, and short fiction by authors in different genres.A writing sample and permission of the instructor are required. Enrollment limited to 12. {A}{L}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 9:20 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Interrogating theories of intellectualism, among them Antonio Gramsci’s notion of traditional and organic intellectuals, and distinctions between categories of criminal and enemy, this course traces the role of black prison writings in the development of American political and legal theory. From 18th-century black captivity narratives and gallows literature through to the work of 20th- and 21st-century thinkers like Malcolm X, Eldridge Cleaver and Angela Davis, this course asks how the incarcerated black intellectual has informed and challenged ideas about nationalism, community and self-formation from the early republic to the present {L}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    AFR Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    Topics course. 

    She was one of the hardest-working and highest paid professional writers of her generation; she was the product of a cushioned life at the upper end of New York Society. Edith Wharton (1862-1937) examined the privileged world into which she was born with an anthropological skepticism, a sardonic dissection of unforgiving social laws and mores, and yet also provided a backwards glance at a vanishing world. A reading of her major work in social and historical context: The House of Mirth, The Custom of the Country, Ethan Frome, Summer, The Age of Innocence and others. {L}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 8
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Writing Sample RequiredReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Topics course. Same as AMS 351. A writing sample and permission of the instructor are required. Enrollment limited to 12. 

    This is a workshop class where students will learn the art of journalism and compose stories that take on questions of gender, feminism, sexuality and power, while simultaneously exploring how the media represents gender and learning the history of women in journalism. No profession has been as important to feminists in challenging oppression than journalism--even as journalism has been historically resistant to a feminist vision. Students will master the fundaments of great reporting and writing—interviewing, structure, voice, style, and ethics—while crafting their own magazine-style stories about people grappling with real-life situations. {A}{L}{S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    AMS Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 7:05 PM-9:35 PM / REMOTE

    Discussion of poetry, short stories, short novels, essays and drama with particular emphasis on the ways in which one might teach them. Consideration of the uses of writing and the leading of discussion classes. For upper-level undergraduates and graduate students who have an interest in teaching. Enrollment limited to 15. {L}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to graduates,juniors and seniors
    EDC Crosslist
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  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 14
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This 1-credit lecture series introduces students to theory and practice in fields related to the environment, sustainability and climate change. Students gain insight into how their liberal arts education and skills in critical thinking and analysis apply to a variety of environmental issues and sustainability contexts. Speakers, including distinguished alumnae, are drawn from the five colleges, the Pioneer Valley and beyond. Graded S/U only. This course can be repeated for credit. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 60
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 57
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    We have entered a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, characterized by the accelerating impact of human activities on the Earth’s ecosystems. All over the globe, humans have transformed the environment and have sometimes created catastrophic dynamics within social-ecological systems. Scientists have studied these phenomena for decades, alerting both the general public and policy-makers of the consequences of our actions. However, despite convincing evidence of environmental degradation, humans continue to radically transform their environment. This course explores this puzzle and asks how we can remodel our social-ecological systems to build a more sustainable and resilient future. {H}{N}{S}
    Linked Course: Yes
    LSS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: DiscussSection Enrollment: 19
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 1:40 PM-2:55 PM

    We have entered a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, characterized by the accelerating impact of human activities on the Earth’s ecosystems. All over the globe, humans have transformed the environment and have sometimes created catastrophic dynamics within social-ecological systems. Scientists have studied these phenomena for decades, alerting both the general public and policy-makers of the consequences of our actions. However, despite convincing evidence of environmental degradation, humans continue to radically transform their environment. This course explores this puzzle and asks how we can remodel our social-ecological systems to build a more sustainable and resilient future. {H}{N}{S}
    Linked Course: Yes
    LSS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: DiscussSection Enrollment: 22
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM

    We have entered a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, characterized by the accelerating impact of human activities on the Earth’s ecosystems. All over the globe, humans have transformed the environment and have sometimes created catastrophic dynamics within social-ecological systems. Scientists have studied these phenomena for decades, alerting both the general public and policy-makers of the consequences of our actions. However, despite convincing evidence of environmental degradation, humans continue to radically transform their environment. This course explores this puzzle and asks how we can remodel our social-ecological systems to build a more sustainable and resilient future. {H}{N}{S}
    Linked Course: Yes
    LSS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: DiscussSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    We have entered a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, characterized by the accelerating impact of human activities on the Earth’s ecosystems. All over the globe, humans have transformed the environment and have sometimes created catastrophic dynamics within social-ecological systems. Scientists have studied these phenomena for decades, alerting both the general public and policy-makers of the consequences of our actions. However, despite convincing evidence of environmental degradation, humans continue to radically transform their environment. This course explores this puzzle and asks how we can remodel our social-ecological systems to build a more sustainable and resilient future. {H}{N}{S}
    Linked Course: Yes
    LSS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 12
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    While focusing on topical environmental issues, students learn how to gather, analyze and present data using methods from the natural and social sciences. Data are drawn from multiple sources, including laboratory experiments, fieldwork, databases, archival sources, surveys and interviews. Emphasis is on quantitative analysis. Environmental topics vary in scale from the local to the global. Note: 202 must be taken concurrently. Prerequisite: 101. Enrollment limited to 18. {N}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: ENV 202
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  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 12
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    In this laboratory complement to 201, students use a variety of methods to gather and analyze different types of environmental data (quantitative, qualitative, spatial). Enrollment limited to 18. {N}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: ENV 201
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 8
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:10 AM / REMOTE

    Same as ANT 224. Anthropology seeks to understand human life in all its complexity, but what constitutes “the human” is far from straightforward. This course examines the changing ways that “Anthropos” is being understood in an era of rapid global climate change and our planet’s sixth mass extinction event, both driven by human activities. We review perspectives on the relationship between humans and their environment from various cultural perspectives, considering how they engage notions of race, class, and gender, and what they imply for nature conservation. Topics include modernity, pets, cyborgs, kinship, symbiosis, extinction, species invasions, settler colonialism, and the Anthropocene concept. Enrollment limited to 30. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    ANT Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 17
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    This course focuses on the interpretation and communication of environmental issues and solutions from multi- and interdisciplinary perspectives. Using contemporary environmental topics as a foundation, this course emphasizes careful assessment of both message and audience to design effective communication strategies for complex topics. Students develop the ability to read, interpret, and critique environmental research from a variety of disciplines; to consider the needs and motivation of their audience; to develop evidence-based arguments tailored to a particular audience; and to articulate those arguments clearly and concisely. Prerequisite: one semester of statistics. ENV 101 and ENV 201/202 are strongly recommended. Enrollment limited to 18. {N}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    LSS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE , Remote Instruction Th 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This course is designed to develop a student’s abilities as an environmental problemsolver through practice. The problems come in two forms: a campus or local problem related to environmental sustainability or resilience, and the problem of what to do with one’s life. To address each, students engage in a semester-long group project that addresses a real-world environmental issue or question (projects vary from year to year) and a more individualized examination of the student’s own values, career aspirations and skills. Student work is assessed via progress reports, exercises, class participation, an oral presentation and a final written report. Prerequisites: 101, a statistics course, 201/202 and 311 (311 may be taken concurrently). Enrollment limited to 16. {N}{S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    LSS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 10
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    A beginning survey course of the disciplines that address physical activity and sport. The course takes into account the general effects of physical activity and how one studies and analyzes these experiences. Course content includes an examination of behavioral, sociocultural, and biophysical experiences and professional possibilities. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 26
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    The physical and psychological components of stress, identification of personal stress response patterns and techniques for daily stress management. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 40
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 20
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    The influence of behavior on health and well-being. Students examine the way in which factors such as nutrition and dietary habits, stress perception and response, and physical activity interact with the physiological processes of health, disease and aging. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    In this course, students will employ mechanical principles to describe and quantify human motion in static and dynamic situations. Students will be introduced to the biomechanical and neural elements that dictate movement and develop skills to analyze functional human movement activities in exercise and daily-living contexts. This course would be of interest to students with an interest in athletics, physical or occupational therapy, orthopedics and biomechanics. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 26
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    An exploration of sporting images as projected through the media. Primary emphasis is on print and electronic journalism, including written narratives, photography, television, film and digital images. The course examines the (re)presentation and (re)production of the athletic or healthy body as the standard for fitness. The topic includes issues on embodiment, cultural symbolism, political and moral ideologies and commercialization. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 6
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    A course designed to plan and implement exercise-training programs for adults. Students learn about applied anatomy, exercise physiology, motivational tools, behavior change, applied biomechanics, and measuring and evaluating fitness variables. During this highly experiential course, students learn to design and operate individualized programs. Students who successfully complete this course are prepared to complete the American College of Sports Medicine’s Certified Personal Trainer certification. Previous experience with weight training recommended. Prerequisites: 100 or 175 is recommended. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 12
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    This course introduces selected topics in ethics and philosophy of sport as they relate to coaching and the broader conception of sport in our culture. Drawing on case studies and contemporary sources, the course examines beliefs about the value of competitive sport, its relationship to higher education and its implication for coaches. Students will develop and articulate their own coaching philosophy, and discuss related topics. 
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to ESS majors AND Limited to graduates
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    This course provides an in-depth exploration of the recruiting process across all three divisions of the NCAA. We explore the entire recruiting process including identifying prospects, understanding your product, creating a brand, networking with allies, developing a recruiting strategy, recruiting through social media, understanding NCAA recruiting rules, generating strong communication with recruits and parents, attracting recruits from diverse backgrounds, implementing creative on campus visits, managing a recruiting budget and exploring recruiting software programs. This course is designed to help each student craft the beginning stages of their recruiting philosophy and to create an overall understanding of the process. First half of term course. 
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to ESS majors AND Limited to graduates
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 3Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: PracticumSection Enrollment: 11
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction / REMOTE

    Assisting in the coaching of an intercollegiate team. Weekly conferences on team management, coach responsibilities and coaching aids. 
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to ESS majors AND Limited to graduates
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: PracticumSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction / REMOTE

    Independent coaching and the study of advanced coaching tactics and strategy in a specific sport. Prerequisite: 505D. This is a full-year course. 
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to ESS majors AND Limited to graduates
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 12
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    This course is about a detailed study of the structure and the function of the human musculoskeletal systems (e.g. joints, bones and muscles). In addition, a few motor control and biomechanical principles that apply to musculoskeletal movement (e.g action potentials, force modulation, line of pull, moment arm, and relate a muscles’ line of pull to generating a torque) will be introduced. Students will learn the skeletal system and skeletal muscles involved in athletic movements and how joints and ligaments promote and limit these movements. 
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to graduates
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 22
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    This course emphasizes the application of exercise physiology to sport. Students study bioenergetics, exercise fuels, training, environmental concerns and overtraining. A major emphasis is the development of an annual training plan for athletes. {N}
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 22
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction F 9:20 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    This course emphasizes the application of exercise physiology to sport. Students study bioenergetics, exercise fuels, training, environmental concerns and overtraining. A major emphasis is the development of an annual training plan for athletes. {N}
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 24
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    Theory and practice of sports medicine with emphasis on injury prevention, protection and rehabilitation. Prerequisite: 210 or the equivalent. Enrollment is limited. {N}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to graduates
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  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: PerformSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 7:45 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    Sectioned course. 

    During this period of remote learning, staying active is especially important for individual health. This course is an introduction to the principles and methods of training to improve and maintain fitness. After completing a survey of their personal fitness goals, living environment and fitness level, each student will design and follow their individualized conditioning program. Students will also be encouraged to discuss their experiences in order to promote a supportive community.. Enrollment limited to 20. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: PerformSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    Sectioned course. 

    During this period of remote learning, staying active is especially important for individual health. This course is an introduction to the principles and methods of training to improve and maintain fitness. After completing a survey of their personal fitness goals, living environment and fitness level, each student will design and follow their individualized conditioning program. Students will also be encouraged to discuss their experiences in order to promote a supportive community. Enrollment limited to 20. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: PerformSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Sectioned course. 

    During this period of remote learning, staying active is especially important for individual health. This course is an introduction to the principles and methods of training to improve and maintain fitness. After completing a survey of their personal fitness goals, living environment and fitness level, each student will design and follow their individualized conditioning program. Students will also be encouraged to discuss their experiences in order to promote a supportive community. Enrollment limited to 20. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: PerformSection Enrollment: 4
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 8:10 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    Sectioned course. 

    This course provides an introduction to various methods of resistance training. The focus of this class is functional strength training. Students learn specific training methods. This is an ideal course for students interested in sport, applied sports medicine and rehabilitation. Enrollment limited to 20. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: PerformSection Enrollment: 3
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 8:10 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    Sectioned course. 

    This course provides an introduction to various methods of resistance training. The focus of this class is functional strength training. Students learn specific training methods. This is an ideal course for students interested in sport, applied sports medicine and rehabilitation. Enrollment limited to 20. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: PerformSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 3:15 PM-4:05 PM / REMOTE

    Sectioned course. 

    A course designed to teach the mat exercises of Joseph Pilates. These exercises increase core strength, increase joint mobility and stability, and increase muscle tone and flexibility. By the end of this course students are able to develop and maintain their own Pilates matwork program. Enrollment limited to 20. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: PerformSection Enrollment: 14
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 4:50 PM-5:40 PM / REMOTE

    Sectioned course. 

    A course designed to teach the mat exercises of Joseph Pilates. These exercises increase core strength, increase joint mobility and stability, and increase muscle tone and flexibility. By the end of this course students are able to develop and maintain their own Pilates matwork program. Enrollment limited to 20. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: PerformSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 8:10 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    Sectioned course. 

    This running-based fitness class is for runners of all levels—from beginners excited to improve to individuals who are ready to step up their training. Each class includes a running workout and running workshop. Students are introduced to different types of workouts and the rationale behind them (such as intervals, fartleks, tempos, and plyometrics), and students learn how to adjust these workouts to meet their individual fitness needs. Workshop topics include form and technique, goal setting, stretching, strengthening, using heart rate monitors, injury prevention, nutrition, workout periodization and many others. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 26
    Course Type: PerformSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    Sectioned course. 

    This class introduces students to Iyengar method, focusing on balancing and aligning body and mind while developing strength, flexibility, endurance and optimal structural alignment. The method also develops self-awareness, intelligent evaluation, confidence, and inward reflection. Students will be introduced to a range of postures (asana) and breathing practices (pranayama) that will address their own individual needs in addition to learning special sequences relieving symptoms of stress, fatigue and physical pain. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 26
    Course Type: PerformSection Enrollment: 21
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 9:20 AM-10:10 AM / REMOTE

    Sectioned course. 

    An introduction to yoga through basic postures, breath techniques, meditation and alignment. Designed to help students reduce stress, improve strength and flexibility, and cultivate the mind/body connection. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 26
    Course Type: PerformSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W F 9:20 AM-10:10 AM / REMOTE

    Sectioned course. 

    An introduction to yoga that is adaptive to the individual, gentle and slowly dynamic with a breath-centered approach. Students will be empowered, giving tools to reduce stress and improve strength, flexibility and alignment. Injuries are accommodated. Students learn to embody experiences of focus, acceptance, courage and letting go. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 26
    Course Type: PerformSection Enrollment: 21
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W F 8:10 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    Sectioned course. 

    An introduction to yoga that is adaptive to the individual, gentle and slowly dynamic with a breath-centered approach. Students will be empowered, giving tools to reduce stress and improve strength, flexibility and alignment. Injuries are accommodated. Students learn to embody experiences of focus, acceptance, courage and letting go. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 120
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 73
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This course introduces students to FMS through units that pair four scholarly approaches with four influential media forms: the Aesthetics of Film, the History of Television, the Ideologies of Video Games, and the Technologies of Internet Media. Through these units, we will ask: what human desires animate our relationship with media? For what purposes have people invented and evolved these technologies? How do makers use them, and what are audiences seeking in them? These questions will help us see the fundamental forces that unite film, television, video games, and Internet media alongside the elements that distinguish them from each other. Students must register for both the lecture and film screening section.  {A}
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 120
    Course Type: FilmSection Enrollment: 73
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction / REMOTE

    This course introduces students to FMS through units that pair four scholarly approaches with four influential media forms: the Aesthetics of Film, the History of Television, the Ideologies of Video Games, and the Technologies of Internet Media. Through these units, we will ask: what human desires animate our relationship with media? For what purposes have people invented and evolved these technologies? How do makers use them, and what are audiences seeking in them? These questions will help us see the fundamental forces that unite film, television, video games, and Internet media alongside the elements that distinguish them from each other. Students must register for both the lecture and film screening section.  {A}
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    By providing viewers from different parts of the world easier access, new online streaming services also familiarize global audiences with quality programming. Emerging local streaming services mimic this model and aim to produce such shows to attract viewers to their platforms by applying the same standards to their originals. A close look at these new online streaming models reveals the complicated relationship between online sharing, piracy and online streaming. While moving between theory and case studies, this class explores this complicated relationship. (E) {A}
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: FilmSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction / REMOTE

    By providing viewers from different parts of the world easier access, new online streaming services also familiarize global audiences with quality programming. Emerging local streaming services mimic this model and aim to produce such shows to attract viewers to their platforms by applying the same standards to their originals. A close look at these new online streaming models reveals the complicated relationship between online sharing, piracy and online streaming. While moving between theory and case studies, this class explores this complicated relationship. (E) {A}
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 39
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    A survey of women in American films from the silent period to the present, examining: 1) how women are represented on film, and how those images relate to actual contemporaneous American society, culture, and politics; 2) how theoretical formulations, expectations, and realities of female spectatorship relate to genre, the star and studio systems (and other production and distribution modes), dominant and alternative codes of narration, and developments in digital and new media modes; and 3) how women as stars, writers, producers, and directors shape and respond to, work within and against, dominant considerations of how women look (in every sense). {A}
    Linked Course: Yes
    SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: FilmSection Enrollment: 39
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction / REMOTE

    A survey of women in American films from the silent period to the present, examining: 1) how women are represented on film, and how those images relate to actual contemporaneous American society, culture, and politics; 2) how theoretical formulations, expectations, and realities of female spectatorship relate to genre, the star and studio systems (and other production and distribution modes), dominant and alternative codes of narration, and developments in digital and new media modes; and 3) how women as stars, writers, producers, and directors shape and respond to, work within and against, dominant considerations of how women look (in every sense). {A}
    Linked Course: Yes
    SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 10
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Special Application RequiredReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction F 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This course will provide a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in making short videos, including: development of a viable story idea or concept, aesthetics and mechanics of shooting video, the role of sound and successful audio recording, and the conceptual and technical underpinnings of digital editing. You will make several short pieces through the semester, working towards a longer final piece. Along with projects and screenings, there will be reading assignments and writing exercises. Prerequisite: FMS 150 or its equivalent (can be taken concurrently). Application and permission of instructor required. Enrollment limited to 12. {A}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): FLS 150 OR FMS 150
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: StudioSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This course provides an overview of the fundamentals of screenwriting. Combining lectures and script analyses, students focus on character development, story structure, conflict, and dialogue featured in academy award-winning screenplays. Students begin with three creative story ideas, developing one concept into a full-length screenplay of their own. Through in-class read-throughs and rewrites, students are required to complete ~30 pages of a full-length screenplay with a detailed outline of the entire story. Graded only. Prerequisites: FMS 150 or ARS 162 with FMS 150 strongly encouraged. Enrollment limited to 12. {A}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): FMS 150 OR ARS 162
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 8
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    The notion of quality is neither objective nor global. The much disputed definition of quality programming is further complicated by the increase in transnational flows of formats and programs as well as the globalization of online streaming models associated with quality programming. This course will explore the elusive definition of the Anglo-American quality programming in light of the following questions: Is it possible to talk about an ongoing globalization of that definition? What is the role of digital technologies in this transformation? What does this transformation mean for the pre-existing hierarchies of power in global TV market? Prerequisite: FMS 150, professor permission only. Priority given to FMS majors and minors. Enrollment limit of 12. (E) {A}
    Linked Course: YesRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: FilmSection Enrollment: 8
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction / REMOTE

    The notion of quality is neither objective nor global. The much disputed definition of quality programming is further complicated by the increase in transnational flows of formats and programs as well as the globalization of online streaming models associated with quality programming. This course will explore the elusive definition of the Anglo-American quality programming in light of the following questions: Is it possible to talk about an ongoing globalization of that definition? What is the role of digital technologies in this transformation? What does this transformation mean for the pre-existing hierarchies of power in global TV market? Prerequisite: FMS 150, professor permission only. Priority given to FMS majors and minors. Enrollment limit of 12. (E) {A}
    Linked Course: YesRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    This course explores interdisciplinary approaches to the search for life in the Universe by using the Earth as a natural laboratory. We will address fundamental questions surrounding the formation of our solar system and the first appearance of life, the definition of life and how we can search for it elsewhere, and the biases we introduce by using Earth as a model system. The goal of this class is to present a multidisciplinary view of exobiology by integrating geology, chemistry, biology, astronomy, and physics. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students.   WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 7:05 PM-8:20 PM / REMOTE

    This first-year seminar offers a multidisciplinary study of three major revolutionary processes in Latin America’s past century. Through the examination of the Mexican Revolution (1910), the Cuban Revolution (1959), and Sendero Luminoso’s insurrection (1980), this seminar explores regional trajectories of failed modernizations, social unrest, state transformations, and post-revolutionary reconfigurations. Weekly meetings are centered on the discussion of bibliography and the analysis of primary sources, including documents, fiction writings, visual arts, films, music, and other materials. As a writing intensive class, students will deliver a series of research reports and one final paper on the topic of their choice. Enrollment limited to 16 first years.  WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    LAS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    Investigates the development of Black diasporic dance in the United States. Through the work of artists such as Beyoncé, Misty Copeland, Arthur Mitchell, Alvin Ailey, Pearl Primus and others, we will explore the multiple and evolving definitions of “Black” dance, Black dance prominence in popular culture and performance, dance and social activism and the historical foundations of Black diasporic dance and aesthetics. We will consider the widespread influence of Black diasporic dance and examine questions of authenticity, appropriation and fusion. Through readings, discussions, visual media and movement experiences, we will practice observing, discussing and writing about dance. Enrollment limited to 16 first years. (E) {A}{H} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 14
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    In Faulkner’s Flags in the Dust the son of a Confederate cavalry officer listens to one of his father’s old troopers describe a memorable raid, and at the end asks what it was all about. Comes the answer: Damned if I know. This course interrogates the spectacularly different replies that question has drawn over the years. We will examine the rhetoric with which the Civil War has been defined in both the documents of the time and in later works of memory. We will read fiction, poetry, speeches, diaries, letters, memoirs and war-reporting; look at period photographs, later monuments and such films as Glory. Works by Stowe, Bierce, Chesnutt, Douglass, Grant, Shaara and others; readings in such historians as Foote, Foner and Faust. This course counts toward the English major. Enrollment limited to 16 first-years. {A} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    ENG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 12:30 PM-1:20 PM / REMOTE

    The United States is one of the most religiously diverse nations on earth. This course investigates that diversity, in the past and in the present, and explores traditions imported to America, recent traditions born in America, and/or traditions indigenous to the Americas. By doing so, this course engages how religious traditions shape and are shaped by other forms of difference (race, class, gender, age, sexuality, etc.). As part of this study, students engage in original ethnographic research to document the religious diversity of the greater Springfield and Pioneer Valley region. Enrollment limited to 16. {H}{S} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    REL Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    Human cultures have persistently imagined the ideal existence as life in a green and flowering garden. Along with plants, gardens have hosted ethical dilemmas, seductions, dramatic increases in knowledge and the prospect of healing for the self and the environment. Meeting in the Plant House on Paradise Pond and ranging from the Book of Genesis to the filmAvatar,this seminar explores the changing meanings of gardens both literary and real, including botanic gardens, secret gardens, Islamic gardens and the Smith campus as academic garden. Includes an independent research project on the history, plantings and meanings of a campus or local garden. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students. {L} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    ENG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Around 3,000 BCE pastoral peoples living in southern Russia domesticated wild horses and invented wheeled vehicles, innovations that allowed them to move vast distances–from China in the east to Ireland in the west. They also developed cultural institutions that enabled them to introduce their language to other communities, a lost tongue that has been partially reconstructed from its surviving daughter languages, including those of India and Iran, Europe and America. We will explore what is known or surmised about this ancient people and reasons for their remarkable success using several kinds of evidence–linguistic, literary, archaeological, ecological and genomic. Enrollment limited to 16. (E) {H}{L} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    ENG Crosslist, WLT Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    This course explores what Toni Morrison in Beloved calls “the living activity of the dead”: their ambitions, their desires, their effects. Often returning as figures of memory or history, ghosts raise troubling questions as to what it is they, or we, have to learn. We shall survey a variety of phantasmagorical representations in poems, short stories, novels, films, spiritualist and scientific treatises and spirit photography. This course counts towards the English major. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students.  WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    ENG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    This course explores how literary writers from various times and places have addressed the topic of girls leaving home. What are the risks and benefits for young (usually single) women who leave a place of origin, temporarily or permanently, with or without families, to make new lives? What do they flee or seek? How do gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, nationality, class complicate their stories? How is “home” understood or redefined in these narratives? Readings include Shakespeare’s "As You Like It", Austen’s "Northanger Abbey", and immigrant American narratives "Bread Givers", "The Woman Warrior" and Americanah". Enrollment limited to 16 first years. {L} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    ENG Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    While the #TimesUp and #MeToo movements have recently brought the problems of sexism, misogyny and the lack of representation to the forefront, the U.S. television industry has long struggled with providing space to women on and behind the screen. Despite the attempts to conne them in the roles ascribed by patriarchal society, women have challenged norms and changed television at the same time. This course explores the history of American television to understand how “unruly women” transformed television by challenging hierarchies of power. Students will be responsible for screening content on a weekly basis. Enrollment limited to 16 first years. (E) {A} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    FMS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 8:10 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    Landscape studies is the interdisciplinary consideration of how we view, define and use the land, whether it be our backyard, a moonscape or a national park. How does land become a landscape? How does space become a place? Scientists study and manipulate landscapes as do politicians, builders, hunters, children, artists and writers, among others. In this course, we examine how writers, in particular, participate in placemaking, and how the landscape influences and inhabits literary texts. The course includes some landscape history and theory, visits by people who study landscape from nonliterary angles, and the discovery of how landscape works in texts in transforming and surprising ways. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students.  WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    This course examines the many ways in which writing has been used to gain, maintain and overturn power throughout Chinese history, from the prognosticating power of oracle bone script to the activist potential of social media. We examine writing as a tactic of agency, a force for social change, and an instrument of state power; analyze the changing role of literature; and consider the physical forms of writing and the millennia-long history of contemporary issues like censorship and writing reform. Finally, students work to make their own writing as powerful as possible. No knowledge of Chinese required. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students. {L} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    EAL Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 14
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This First Year Seminar combines historical, theoretical, and material-cultural sources about housing in/justice in the United States, including the recent public popularity of tiny homes. We critically consider scholarly and popular cultural sources engaging the present, past, and (potential) future roles of small homes in America, with a special public writing focus on housing justice in western MA. We attend to cultural-historical trends in home size and location as a way to better understand race, class, disability, settler-colonialism, gender, age, sexuality, “the urban,” nature, sustainability, nation, health, debt, culture, and other analytics key to interdisciplinary college-level scholarship. Enrollment limited to 16 first years. (E) {H}{S} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 19
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Syria today is at the center of turmoil that is remaking the Middle East and challenging global security. Civil war, violent extremism, sectarian polarization and the globalization of terrorism have devastated the country, leading to mass population displacement and the most severe humanitarian crisis since WWII. By exploring the historical origins and the current trajectory of Syria’s revolution in 2011 and its collapse into violent conflict, the seminar provides critical insight into the forces that are defining the future of Syria and the Middle East. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students. {S} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    GOV Crosslist, MES Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    Some have defined history as “what the present needs to know about the past.” What do we need to know about the past today? In this course, students will work together to develop several historical questions to help us understand the present in the United States. Over the semester, we will attempt to answer these questions with readings and other materials that students will create along with the instructor. The course will contain a substantial public writing element. Enrollment limited to 16 first years. (E) {H} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 14
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / SEELYE 110

    This course explores popular protest in medieval Europe during the 14th century and examines how and why pandemic transformed these movements. Before 1350 protest movements typically coalesced around the idea that elites failed to fulfill their social function. In the wake of the Black Death the nature of these protests changed. Increasingly, they called for broad, systemic change and a wider reorganization of society. The course will pay particular attention to the Ciompi Revolt in Florence in 1378 and the 1381 uprising in England, which some historians have identified as the first proletariat revolt and the beginning of class consciousness. Enrollment limited to 16 first years. {H} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    HST Crosslist, MED Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 19
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    This seminar explores the diversity of reproduction in mammals from genetics to environmental adaptations, but all from the perspective of female mammals. How does the female perspective change the way we think about reproduction? For instance, conception vs. fertilization; embryo rejection vs. miscarriage. We cover basic concepts as well as the biases and assumptions present in the study of mammalian reproduction. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students.  WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 7:45 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    This course closely examines political, cultural, intellectual, and spiritual mobilizations for Black Lives on local, global and hemispheric levels. We will engage an array of materials ranging from literature, history, oral histories, folklore, dance, music, popular culture, social media, ethnography, and film/documentaries. By centering the political and intellectual labor of Black women and LGBTQ folks at the forefront of the movements for Black Lives, we unapologetically excavate how #BlackLivesMatterEverywhere has a long and rich genealogy in the African diaspora. Lastly, students will be immersed in Black queer feminist theorizations on diaspora, political movements, and the multiplicities of Blackness. Enrollment limited to 16 first years. {H}{S} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    AFR Crosslist, LAS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    The term “existentialism” refers to a nexus of twentieth-century philosophical and literary explorations focused on themes including human freedom, responsibility, temporality, ambiguity, and mortality. Existentialists Simone de Beauvoir, Albert Camus, Martin Heidegger, and Jean-Paul Sartre oppose a longstanding philosophical view that human beings flourish by understanding themselves and the cosmos in rational terms. In addition to exploring assigned readings in depth, the seminar addresses broader questions: “Are there insights involving existentialist themes that literary works are in a distinctive position to convey?” “Is there an existentialist ethics?” and “Do existentialists’ realizations about living well continue to have resonance today?”. Enrollment limited to 16. {H} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    PHI Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 17
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    This seminar introduces students to the trailblazing women who have changed the American social and political landscape through reform, mobilization, cultural interventions and outright rebellion. We use a variety of texts: No Turning Back by Estelle Freedman, primary sources from the archives and the SCMA, films, a walking tour and local events. The intention of this seminar is threefold: (1) to provide an overview of feminist ideas and action throughout American history, (2) to introduce students to primary documents and research methods, and (3) to encourage reflection and discussion on current gender issues. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students.  {H}{S} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This course focuses on plays by Shakespeare, and what people have made for the screen from his plays. We will read five of Shakespeare’s plays. After reading and discussing each play, we will watch multiple screen works created from that play. We investigate the choices made by directors, adapters, actors, designers, and other artists involved. What matters to them about the source play? What doesn’t? Do they approach Shakespeare with reverence? Do they admit to their source? How do politics, ideology, period, national or international film and television traditions, genre, and individual artistry change, uphold, or alchemize the original material?Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students.  WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This seminar examines the various forms of black “politics,” broadly conceived, that emerged and developed in the wake of the modern civil rights movement to the present time. Major topics of concern include: black nationalism and electoral politics, black feminism, resistance to mass incarceration, the war on drugs, black urban poverty, the rise of the black middle class, reparations, the Obama presidency, Black Lives Matter and other contemporary social movements. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students. (E) {H} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    AFR Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 17
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Examining Italian cinema from neorealism to today, this course investigates how major directors have negotiated two apparently independent postwar traditions: the aesthetic of realism (which purports to show Italian society and landscape without embellishments) and that search for beauty and style which has historically characterized Italian civilization and become its trademark in today’s global culture (Made in Italy). We study the Italian pinups of postwar cinema, the Latin lover figure, representations of Fascism, the Bel Paese myth, portraits of the lower classes and the immigrants. Directors include Amelio, Antonioni, Bertolucci, De Santis, De Sica, Germi, Moretti, Ozpetek, Pasolini, Sorrentino and Visconti. Conducted in English. Films with English subtitles. This course counts toward the film and media studies and Italian studies majors. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students. {A}{L} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    FMS Crosslist, ITL Crosslist, WLT Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 14
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    This is a course that crosses the boundaries of genre as it moves from literature of pandemics to nonfiction prose about pandemics and, finally, to a section that involves COVID19—and a visit from a biologist who teaches Infectious disease. A final paper may be nonfiction narrative prose about experiences during the COVID19 pandemic. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students. {L} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    ENG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    A cancer diagnosis immerses patients in specialized jargon, complex treatments, and contentious discourses. Pink Ribbons. Red Devil. “Fu*k Cancer.” FOLFOX. The “good” cancer. “losing the battle.” In this first year seminar, we will interrogate cancer discourses, including common representations and refutations made by cancer patients and cancer experts. We will approach our topic by centering cancer patients, especially those who experience marginalization. Sources include essays, films, websites, brochures, letters, memoirs, art, fiction, journalism, plants, scientific data, and peer reviewed scholarship, and we will learn to strengthen our reading, writing, speaking, and research skills. Enrollment limited to 16 first-years. (E) {H}{S} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    HSC Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 17
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Why do people collect things and what do they collect? Members of this seminar explore these questions by focusing on local museums and exhibitions. From a behind-the-scenes look at the Smith College Museum of Art to an examination of hidden gems like the botanical sciences herbarium collection or that cabinet of curiosities which is Mount Holyoke’s Skinner Museum, we research the histories of these collections and analyze the rationale of varying systems for ordering objects. By learning the critical skills of visual analysis and by grappling with the interpretations of art historians, anthropologists and psychologists, we attempt to come to an understanding of how knowledge is constructed in the context of display and how visual juxtapositions can generate meaning. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students.  WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    ART Crosslist, MUX Crosslist
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  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W Th F 8:10 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    This elementary French course is designed to give students with no previous experience in French the opportunity to acquire the fundamentals of the French language and Francophone culture. It emphasizes communicative proficiency, the development of oral and listening skills, self-expression and cultural insights. Classroom activities incorporate authentic French material and are focused on acquiring competency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students must complete both 101 and 103 to fulfill the Latin honors distribution requirement for a foreign language. Enrollment limited to 25. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W Th F 12:30 PM-1:20 PM / REMOTE

    This elementary French course is designed to give students with no previous experience in French the opportunity to acquire the fundamentals of the French language and Francophone culture. It emphasizes communicative proficiency, the development of oral and listening skills, self-expression and cultural insights. Classroom activities incorporate authentic French material and are focused on acquiring competency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students must complete both 101 and 103 to fulfill the Latin honors distribution requirement for a foreign language. Enrollment limited to 25. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W Th F 8:10 AM-9:00 AM

    This elementary French course is designed to give students with no previous experience in French the opportunity to acquire the fundamentals of the French language and Francophone culture. It emphasizes communicative proficiency, the development of oral and listening skills, self-expression and cultural insights. Classroom activities incorporate authentic French material and are focused on acquiring competency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students must complete both 101 and 103 to fulfill the Latin honors distribution requirement for a foreign language. Enrollment limited to 25. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 10
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    An intermediate language course designed for students with two or three years of high school French. Its main objective is to develop cultural awareness and the ability to speak and write in French through exposure to a variety of media (literary texts, newspaper articles, ads, clips, films, videos). Students completing the course normally enter 220. Enrollment limited to 18. {F}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 8
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    An intermediate language course designed for students with two or three years of high school French. Its main objective is to develop cultural awareness and the ability to speak and write in French through exposure to a variety of media (literary texts, newspaper articles, ads, clips, films, videos). Students completing the course normally enter 220. Enrollment limited to 18. {F}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 8
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 8:10 AM-9:00 AM / REMOTE

    Review of communicative skills through writing and class discussion. Materials include two movies, a comic book and two novels. Prerequisite: three or four years of high school French; 103 or 120, or permission of the instructor. Students completing the course normally enter 230. Enrollment limited to 18. {F}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 11
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:10 AM / REMOTE

    Review of communicative skills through writing and class discussion. Materials include two movies, a comic book and two novels. Prerequisite: three or four years of high school French; 103 or 120, or permission of the instructor. Students completing the course normally enter 230. Enrollment limited to 18. {F}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 12:30 PM-1:20 PM / REMOTE

    Review of communicative skills through writing and class discussion. Materials include two movies, a comic book and two novels. Prerequisite: three or four years of high school French; 103 or 120, or permission of the instructor. Students completing the course normally enter 230. Enrollment limited to 18. {F}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 18
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:10 AM / REMOTE

    Topics course. A gateway to more advanced courses. These colloquia develop skills in expository writing and critical thinking in French. Materials include novels, films, essays and cultural documents. Students may receive credit for only one section of 230. Enrollment limited to 18. Basis for the major. Prerequisite: 220 or permission of the instructor. 

    In this course, students study fiction, memoir, slam poetry and hip-hop authored by residents of France’s multi-ethnic suburbs and housing projects, also known as the "banlieues" and "cités". We examine the question of whether "banlieue" authors can escape various pressures: to become native informants; to write realistic rather than fantastical novels; to leave the “ghetto”; to denounce the sometimes difficult traditions, religions, neighborhoods and family members that have challenged but also molded them. Often seen as spaces of regression and decay, the "banlieues" nevertheless produce vibrant cultural expressions that beg the question: Is the "banlieue" a mere suburb of French cultural life, or more like one of its centers? {F}{L}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 17
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    An introduction to the main cultural and literary currents that shaped Medieval France, a period whose values and concept of “literature” were dramatically different from our own. We focus on the rise of courtliness and the invention of romantic love, the legend of King Arthur and the transmission of Celtic themes, adultery and madness, magic and the chivalric quest, and the ribald humour of the fabliaux. Readings include The Romance of the Rose by Guillaume de Lorris, Tristan and Yseut, Marie de France’s Lanval, Chrétien de Troyes’ Yvain, troubadour and trouvère lyric, and selected fabliaux. Prerequisite: 230. {F}{L}
    Linked Course: No
    MED Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 11
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W F 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    What was it like to live in Paris under the German occupation? What were the moral dilemmas and the political risks that Parisians faced as they struggled to survive? And how are we, today, to judge this historical period and those who lived through it? Students experience this difficult period through a global simulation in which each creates a character with a specific identity and past—a secret collaborator, a Jewish immigrant, a resistance fighter, a closeted homosexual, an avant-garde artist, a reporter, the widow of a soldier who fought under Maréchal Pétain in WWI—and representing the diversity of the Parisian population at the time. Each student writes her character’s “memoirs” reacting to historical as well as personal events from her unique perspective. Readings range from historical documents, speeches, and testimonials to drama, fiction. Weekly films. In French. Prerequisite: 230. Enrollment limited to 16. {F}{H}{L} WI
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 35
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 5
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M 4:50 PM-5:40 PM / REMOTE

    This course functions as a French discussion course offered in conjunction with SWG 288. Students attend all sessions of SWG 288 and meet one additional hour per week to discuss the assigned texts, which they will read in the original French. Papers and assignments must also be written in French. Prerequisites: One course at or above FRN 250. French heritage speakers should contact the instructor. Co-registration with SWG 288 required. Enrollment limited to 35. {F}{H}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    Coreq: SWG 288
    SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 0
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Same as ITL/SPN/POR 299. The course explores the issues in world language instruction and research that are essential to the teaching of Romance languages. Special focus will be on understanding local, national and international multilingual communities as well as theories, methods, bilingualism, and heritage language studies. Topics include the history of Romance languages, how to teach grammar/vocabulary, the role of instructors, and feedback techniques. The critical framing provided will help students look at schools as cultural sites, centers of immigration and globalization. Class observations and scholarly readings help students understand the importance of research in the shaping of the pedagogical practice of world languages. Prerequisite: At least 4 semesters (or placement to equivalent level) of a Romance language taught at Smith (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish or French). Enrollment limit of 25. {F}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    EDC Crosslist, ITL Crosslist, LNG Crosslist, SPP Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 12
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    Topics course. 

    In this seminar, we look at films that make a deliberate and often caricatural use of stereotypes in order to make a statement, whether it is to provoke, examine, question, or simply illustrate some aspects of French culture or national consciousness. The stereotypes we consider include cinematic genres (comedies), as well as themes or topics (tradition versus modernity, ‘Frenchness’, racial and class differences). In doing so, we pay particular attention to the way these stereotypes are staged, what their modes of inquiry are, and what conversations, if any, they promote. Films by Renoir, Tati, Buñuel, Jeunet, Ozon, and Sciamma among others. Weekly or bi-weekly film viewings. Readings in film criticism and relevant fields. In French. {A}{F}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    FMS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 21
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    An exploration of the concepts that provide a unifying explanation for the causes of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions and the formation of mountains, continents and oceans. A discussion of the origin of life on earth, the patterns of evolution and extinction in plants and animals, and the rise of humans. Students planning to major in geosciences should also take GEO 102 concurrently. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    ENV Crosslist, LSS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 17
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 5
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / BURTON 110

    The Connecticut Valley region is rich with geologic features that can be reached by a short van ride from Smith. This is a field-based course that explores geology through weekly trips and associated assignments during which we examine evidence for volcanoes, dinosaurs, glaciers, rifting continents and Himalayan-size mountains in Western Massachusetts. Students who have taken FYS 103 Geology in the Field are not eligible to take GEO 102. This class, when taken in conjunction with any other 100-level course, can serve as a pathway to the Geoscience major. Enrollment limited to 17, with preference to students who are enrolled concurrently in GEO 101 or who have already taken a Geoscience course. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    ENV Crosslist, LSS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 2Max Enrollment: 17
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 5
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: Yes
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    The Connecticut Valley region is rich with geologic features that can be reached by a short van ride from Smith. This is a field-based course that explores geology through weekly trips and associated assignments during which we examine evidence for volcanoes, dinosaurs, glaciers, rifting continents and Himalayan-size mountains in Western Massachusetts. Students who have taken FYS 103 Geology in the Field are not eligible to take GEO 102. This class, when taken in conjunction with any other 100-level course, can serve as a pathway to the Geoscience major. Enrollment limited to 17, with preference to students who are enrolled concurrently in GEO 101 or who have already taken a Geoscience course. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    ENV Crosslist, LSS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 26
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    This course seeks to answer the following questions: What do we know about past climate and how do we know it? What causes climate to change? What have been the results of relatively recent climate change on human populations? What is happening today? What is likely to happen in the future? What choices do we have? {N}
    Linked Course: No
    ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    A project-oriented study of minerals and the information they contain about planetary processes. The theory and application to mineralogic problems of crystallography, crystal chemistry, crystal optics, x-ray diffraction, quantitative x-ray spectroscopy and other spectroscopic techniques. The course normally includes a weekend field trip to see minerals in the field. Prerequisite: 101 and 102, or 108, or FYS 103, or 102 with any other GEO 100-level course. 102 can be taken concurrently. Recommended: CHM 111 or equivalent. {N}
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    A project-oriented study of minerals and the information they contain about planetary processes. The theory and application to mineralogic problems of crystallography, crystal chemistry, crystal optics, x-ray diffraction, quantitative x-ray spectroscopy and other spectroscopic techniques. The course normally includes a weekend field trip to see minerals in the field. Prerequisite: 101 and 102, or 108, or FYS 103, or 102 with any other GEO 100-level course. 102 can be taken concurrently. Recommended: CHM 111 or equivalent. {N}
    Linked Course: Yes
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    A project-oriented study of the processes and products of sediment formation, transport, deposition and lithification. Modern sediments and depositional environments of the Massachusetts coast are examined and compared with ancient sedimentary rocks of the Connecticut River Valley and eastern New York. Field and laboratory analyses focus on the description and classification of sedimentary rocks, and on the interpretation of their origin. The results provide unique insights into the geologic history of eastern North America. Two weekend field trips. Prerequisite: 101 and 102, or 108, or FYS 103, or 102 with any other GEO 100-level course. 102 can be taken concurrently. {N}
    Linked Course: Yes
    ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    A project-oriented study of the processes and products of sediment formation, transport, deposition and lithification. Modern sediments and depositional environments of the Massachusetts coast are examined and compared with ancient sedimentary rocks of the Connecticut River Valley and eastern New York. Field and laboratory analyses focus on the description and classification of sedimentary rocks, and on the interpretation of their origin. The results provide unique insights into the geologic history of eastern North America. Two weekend field trips. Prerequisite: 101 and 102, or 108, or FYS 103, or 102 with any other GEO 100-level course. 102 can be taken concurrently. {N}
    Linked Course: Yes
    ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 8
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    An introduction to spoken and written German, and to the culture and history of German-speaking peoples and countries. Emphasis on grammar and practical vocabulary for use in conversational practice, written exercises, and listening and reading comprehension. By the end of the year, students are able to read short, edited literary and journalistic texts as a basis for classroom discussion and to compose short written assignments. Yearlong courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 5Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 10
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    An introduction to spoken and written German, and to the culture and history of German-speaking peoples and countries. Emphasis on grammar and practical vocabulary for use in conversational practice, written exercises, and listening and reading comprehension. By the end of the year, students are able to read short, edited literary and journalistic texts as a basis for classroom discussion and to compose short written assignments. Yearlong courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 9
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    An exploration of contemporary German culture through literary and journalistic texts, with regular practice in written and oral expression. A review of basic grammatical concepts and the study of new ones, with emphasis on vocabulary building. Prerequisite: 110Y, permission of the instructor, or by placement. {F}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 7
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    An exploration of contemporary German culture through literary and journalistic texts, with regular practice in written and oral expression. A review of basic grammatical concepts and the study of new ones, with emphasis on vocabulary building. Prerequisite: 110Y, permission of the instructor, or by placement. {F}
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W F 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    Topics course. 

    An introduction to the study of German literature and film, designed to develop skills in oral expression and the fundamentals of literary and film analysis. In this course we will closely read works both entertaining and startling that deal with the mysteries of the human mind and with journeys experienced or imagined. Works by the Brothers Grimm, Hoffmann, Kafka, Freud and others will provide the basis for discussions. Prerequisite: GER 250, GER 260 or by placement. (E) {F}
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 6
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    A study of language, culture and politics in the German-language media; supplemental materials reflecting the interests and academic disciplines of students in the seminar. Practice of written and spoken German through compositions, linguistic exercises and oral reports. Conducted in German. Prerequisite: GER 300 or permission of the instructor. {F}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
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  • Credits: 1Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 22
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 3:15 PM-5:15 PM / REMOTE

    This eight-week lecture series provides an overview of the financial system and the role of financial institutions in the global economy; domestic and international regulation; domestic and international banking. Faculty and guest lecturers reflect on contemporary developments and challenges in their fields. First half of semester course. 
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 30
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    A study of the leading ideas of the Western political tradition, focusing on such topics as justice, power, legitimacy, revolution, freedom, equality and forms of government—democracy especially. Open to all students. Entering students considering a major in government are encouraged to take the course in their first year, either in the fall or the spring semester. {S}
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 23
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    A study of the leading ideas of the Western political tradition, focusing on such topics as justice, power, legitimacy, revolution, freedom, equality and forms of government—democracy especially. Open to all students. Entering students considering a major in government are encouraged to take the course in their first year, either in the fall or the spring semester. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 30
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 22
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    A study of the leading ideas of the Western political tradition, focusing on such topics as justice, power, legitimacy, revolution, freedom, equality and forms of government—democracy especially. Open to all students. Entering students considering a major in government are encouraged to take the course in their first year, either in the fall or the spring semester. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 35
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    An examination and analysis of electoral politics in the United States. Voting and elections are viewed in the context of democracy. Topics include electoral participation, presidential selection, campaigns, electoral behavior, public opinion, parties and Congressional elections. {S}
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 48
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    An examination and analysis of electoral politics in the United States. Voting and elections are viewed in the context of democracy. Topics include electoral participation, presidential selection, campaigns, electoral behavior, public opinion, parties and Congressional elections. {S}
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 31
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    This course introduces students to comparative political analysis and provides a foundation to better understand major political, economic and social forces in a diverse set of countries. We first focus on key methods and concepts such as state and nation, asking where states come from and how are nations built. The course then addresses questions including: Why are some countries democratic and others authoritarian? How do states promote or stymie economic development? What role do civil society and social groups play in political and economic transition? The course combines theoretical and conceptual analysis with cases drawn from around the world. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    GSD Crosslist, LAS Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 16
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    A comparative analysis of Latin American political systems. Emphasis on the politics of development, the problems of leadership, legitimacy and regime continuity. A wide range of countries and political issues is covered. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    LAS Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 29
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    This course explores the practical meaning of the term “development” and its impact on a range of global topics from the problems of poverty and income inequality to the spread of democracy, environmental degradation, urbanization and gender empowerment. We examine existing theories of economic development and consider how state governments, international donors and NGOs interact to craft development policy. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    AFS Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 50
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 25
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    Why and how do we hold elections? In this class, we study the rules that structure how we select leaders to represent us and the subsequent political behavior in response to those rules. Our examination of elections worldwide involves a global overview of modern elections, including those held in authoritarian regimes. By the end of the course, each student is an expert on an election of their choice. We have two questions motivating our journey in this course. First, do elections matter? Second, how should we hold elections?  {S}
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 40
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 21
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This course begins with an examination of the broad theoretical paradigms in international political economy (IPE), including the liberal, economic nationalist, structuralist and Marxist persepctives. The course analyzes critical debates in the post-World War II period, including the role of the Bretton Woods institutions (World Bank group and IMF), international trade and development, the debt question, poverty and global inequality and the broad question of “globalization.” Prerequisite: 241 or permission of the instructor. First-year students may enroll only if they have completed 241. Enrollment limited to 40. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    ENV Crosslist, GSD Crosslist, RES Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 20
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This course examines refugees—i.e., people displaced within their country, to another country or, perhaps, somewhere “in between.” Refugee politics prompt a consideration of the cause of refugee movements; persecution, flight, asylum and resettlement dynamics; the international response to humanitarian crises; and the “position” of refugees in the international system. In addition to international relations theory, the seminar focuses on historical studies, international law, comparative politics, refugee policy studies and anthropological approaches to displacement and “foreignness.” Although special attention is devoted to the Middle East, other cases of refugee politics are examined. Open to majors in government; others by permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    AFS Crosslist, GSD Crosslist, MES Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 23
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    A study of Machiavellian power-politics and of efforts by social contract and utilitarian liberals to render that politics safe and humane. Topics considered include political behavior, republican liberty, empire and war; the state of nature, natural law/natural right, sovereignty and peace; limitations on power, the general will, and liberalism’s relation to moral theory, religion and economics. Readings from Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Hume, Smith and others; also novels and plays. {S}
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 13
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 1:40 PM-2:55 PM / REMOTE

    A departmental version of the historical role-playing First-Year Seminar by the same name, featuring games on the American Revolution and the Constitutional Convention. Course satisfies the department’s political theory requirement and is open to all levels of students. {S}
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 23
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 3:15 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This class is a cross-sectional look at the Obama presidency, including his path to election, major domestic, national, and foreign policy debates, and the conflicts of those eight years. Enrollment limit of 20. (E) {S}
    Linked Course: No
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 12
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor Permission ReqReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction F 9:20 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    Topics course. 

    This seminar explores the status of the family in American political life and its role as a mediating structure between the individual and the state. Emphasis is placed on the role of the courts in articulating the rights of the family and its members. Suggested preparation: GOV 202 or WST 225. {S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
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