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A Culture of Care

Read Smith’s UPDATED plans as of August 5, 2020,
for an entirely remote fall 2020 semester.

Course Search

You may search for courses meeting the criteria offered below. If a search results in too many courses, add criteria or select a more narrow category. If you searched only by department and term, cross-listed courses will be displayed at the bottom of the list.

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    If you searched only by department and term, cross-listed courses will be displayed at the bottom of the list.

    3 cross listed courses found for the selected term.


  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 28
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:55 AM-12:10 PM / REMOTE

    What can anthropologists teach us about religion as a social phenomenon? This course traces significant anthropological approaches to the study of religion, asking what these approaches contribute to our understanding of religion in the contemporary world. Topics include religious experience and rationality; myth, ritual and magic; rites of passage; function and meaning; power and alienation; religion and politics. Readings are drawn from important texts in the history of anthropology and from contemporary ethnographies of religion. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    BUS Crosslist, REL Crosslist, SAS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 10
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 9:20 AM-10:35 AM / REMOTE

    Topics course. 

    This seminar applies and extends microeconomic theory to analyze selected topics related to the India’s economic development. Throughout the course an emphasis is placed on empirically testing economic hypotheses using data from India. In particular, the following topics are explored, with reference to India’s growth and development: education, health, demographics, caste and gender, institutions, credit, insurance, infrastructure, water and climate change. Topics and assignments may be changed in response to the class’s particular interests. Prerequisites: ECO 220 and 250. Recommended: ECO 211 or 213. {S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    SAS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 15
    Instructional Method: Remote onlyWaitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor PermissionReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 1:40 PM-4:30 PM / REMOTE

    This 300-level seminar provides an in-depth engagement with global migration. It covers such areas as theories of migration, the significance of global political economy and state policies across the world in shaping migration patterns and immigrant identities. Questions about imperialism, post-colonial conditions, nation-building/national borders, citizenship, and the gendered racialization of immigration intersect as critical contexts for our discussions. Prerequisite: SOC 101 and permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. {S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    GSD Crosslist, SAS Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

The data in the course catalog are refreshed daily. Information concerning current and future course offerings is posted as it becomes available and is subject to change.

Smith College reserves the right to make changes to all announcements in the online Smith College Catalog Database, including changes in its course offerings, instructors, requirements for the majors and minors, and degree requirements. Course information contained herein is compiled and updated at regularly scheduled intervals by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty from data submitted by departments and programs. All data listed are as officially and formally approved by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty, the Committee on Academic Priorities and the faculty-at-large.