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A Culture of Care

Read Smith’s UPDATED plans as of August 5, 2020,
for an entirely remote fall 2020 semester.

Course Search

You may search for courses meeting the criteria offered below. If a search results in too many courses, add criteria or select a more narrow category. If you searched only by department and term, cross-listed courses will be displayed at the bottom of the list.

    COURSE CATALOG SEARCH RESULTS

    9 courses found for the selected term.
    Click on a course title for more information.
    Click on a department code to view complete departmental listings.
    If you searched only by department and term, cross-listed courses will be displayed at the bottom of the list.


  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 23
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:20 PM-2:35 PM / SEELYE 306

    An introduction to the interdisciplinary field of the study of women and gender through a critical examination of feminist histories, issues and practices. Focus on the U.S. with some attention to the global context. Primarily for first- and second-year students, the course includes lecture and discussion, and students are assigned to sections. Enrollment limited to 25. {H}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 25
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 32
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 10:50 AM-12:05 PM / SEELYE 110

    An introduction to the interdisciplinary field of the study of women and gender through a critical examination of feminist histories, issues and practices. Focus on the U.S. with some attention to the global context. Primarily for first- and second-year students, the course includes lecture and discussion, and students are assigned to sections. Enrollment limited to 25. {H}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    ENV Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 48
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 10:50 AM-12:05 PM / SEELYE 201

    This course explores the impact of gender on law and policy in the United States historically and today, focusing in the areas of constitutional equality, employment, education, reproduction, the family, violence against women, and immigration. We study constitutional and statutory law as well as public policy. Some of the topics we will cover are sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination, pregnancy/caregiver discrimination, pay equity, sexual harassment, school athletics, marriage, sterilization, contraception and abortion, reproductive technologies, sexual assault, intimate partner violence, and gender-based asylum. We will study feminist efforts to reform the law and examine how inequalities based on gender, race, class and sexuality shape the law. We also discuss and debate contemporary policy and future directions. {H}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    PPL Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 9
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction F 1:10 PM-4:00 PM / SEELYE 302

    This course is an introduction to queer feminist theory. We will consider varied articulations of both feminism and queerness and ways the relationship between them has been narrated and debated. Questions explored include: what might it mean to “queer” feminism? What might it mean to understand queerness through a feminist lens? How might we understand the place of the figure of the lesbian in imagining queer feminism? What sorts of ethical questions might queer feminist perspectives center? Concepts explored include: the centrality of race to concepts ofgenderand sexuality, relationships among feminist, queer, and trans studies, and sexual ethics. Prerequisite: SWG 150. 
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 26
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W F 2:45 PM-4:00 PM / SEELYE 110

    We begin this course by working alongside Gardening the Community, a youth-based and anti-racist food and land movement in Springfield, MA.We center our studies on both regional and transnational women’s movements across the globe to develop our understanding about current economic trends in globalization processes. Through the insights of transnational feminist analysis, we map the history of land and food to imagine a more equitable present and future. Students will develop a community-based research project that spans issues of climate change, environmentalism, critical race analysis and feminism, write papers and written reflections about their work. Prerequisite: SWG 150. {H}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    ENV Crosslist, SAS Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 21
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:20 PM-2:35 PM / HATFLD 106

    Dragon ladies, lotus blossoms, geisha girls: The U.S. cultural imaginary is saturated with myths regarding Asian sexuality andgender. This interdisciplinary course intervenes into this dominant imaginary by exploring feminist and queer frameworks derived from Asian American contexts: immigration, labor, militarism, so-called “terrorism,” beauty, family, and movement-building. Through a mix of scholarly, creative, activist, literary, and media texts, we will challenge preconceived notions of Asian Americans as “model minorities,” repressed, politically regressive, or hyper-sexual, as well as explore the diversity of Asian Americangenderand sexuality offered within literature, film, performance, and culture. Prerequisite: SWG 150. {A}{L}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): SWG 150
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 50
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 43
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 2:45 PM-4:00 PM / SEELYE 201

    This course will analyze the history, prevalence, and current manifestations of the white supremacist movement by examining ideological components, tactics and strategies, and its relationship to mainstream politics. We will also research and discuss the relationship between white supremacy and white privilege, and explore how to build a human rights movement to counter the white supremacist movement in the U.S. Students will develop analytical writing and research skills, while engaging in multiple cultural perspectives. The overall goal is to develop the capacity to understand the range of possible responses to white supremacy, both its legal and extralegal forms. Enrollment limited to 50. (E) {H}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 9
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:50 AM-12:05 PM / WRIGHT 238

    What is learned by reading Queer Ecologies alongside Octavia Butler’s Lilith’s Brood? What does Over the Hedge have to do with environmental racism (Hamilton)? In short, these texts ask us to consider what it means to have a racialized and sexualized identity shaped by relationships with environments. We will ask: How is nature gendered and sexualized? Why? How are analytics of power mobilized around, or in opposition to, nature? We will investigate the discursive and practical connections made between marginalized peoples and nature, and chart the knowledge gained by queering our conceptions of nature and the natural. Enrollment limited to 18. (E) {H}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    HSC Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 10
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor PermissionReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 1:20 PM-4:00 PM / HATFLD 201

    This course is an advanced seminar in the growing field of queer American history. Over the course of the semester, we will explore the histories of same-sex desire, practice, and identity, as well as gender transgressions, from the late 19th century to the present. Using a wide range of sources, including archival documents, films, work by historians, and oral histories, we will investigate how and why people with same-sex desire and non-normative gender expressions formed communities, struggled against bigotry, and organized movements for social and political change. This course will pay close attention to the intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality and the ways that difference has shaped queer history. Not open to first-years and sophomores. Prerequisite: SWG 150 and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. {H}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    HST Crosslist
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  • 34 cross listed courses found for the selected term.


  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 25
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 2:45 PM-4:00 PM / SEELYE 109

    An introduction to some of the major perspectives, themes, and issues in the field of Afro-American studies. Our focus is on the economic, social and political aspects of cultural production, and how these inform what it means to read, write about, view and listen to Black culture. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    LAS Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 19
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:25 AM-10:40 AM / SEELYE 306

    Topics course. 

    Why has the construction of archives that center on the experiences of people of African descent been so critical to black political, cultural, and social life? What do black archives look like and what do they offer us? How do they expand the way we consider archives in general? This course seeks to address these questions by examining the conception and development of black archives, primarily, although not exclusively, as they arose in the United States across the twentieth century. Enrollment limit of 20. (E)  {H}
    Linked Course: No
    HST Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 28
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 10:50 AM-12:05 PM / SEELYE 302

    How does gender matter in a black context? That is the question we will ask and attempt to answer through an examination of works by such authors as Harriet Jacobs, Frances Harper, Nella Larsen, Zora Hurston, Toni Morrison, Ntozake Shange and Alice Walker. {L}
    Linked Course: No
    ENG Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 4
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor PermissionReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:20 PM-4:00 PM / MCCONN 104

    Same as ENG 323. This seminar focuses on Toni Morrison’s literary production. In reading her novels, essays, lectures and interviews, we pay particular attention to three things: her interest in the epic anxieties of American identities; her interest in form, language, and theory; and her study of love. {L}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    ENG Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 18
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 9:25 AM-10:40 AM / SEELYE 211

    This course serves as an introductory exploration of the field of disability studies. It asks: how do we define disability? Who is disabled? And what resources do we need to properly study disability? Together, students investigate: trends in disability activism, histories of medicine and science, conceptions of “normal” embodiment, the utility of terms like “crip” or "disabled” and the representation of disability in culture. Enrollment limit of 20.  {H}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 31
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:20 PM-2:35 PM / SEELYE 206

    This course uses anthropological approaches and theories to understand reproduction as a social, cultural and biological process. Drawing on cross-cultural studies of pregnancy and childbirth, new reproductive technologies, infertility and family planning, the course examines how society and culture shape biological experiences of reproduction. We also explore how anthropological studies and theories of reproduction intersect with larger questions about nature and culture, kinship and citizenship among others. {S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years
    SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 3
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor PermissionReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 9:25 AM-12:05 PM / SAGE 16

    Topics course. 

    Making a place of one’s own entails occupying and consuming what the place consists of. Human inhabitation of the planet can be seen as simultaneously productive and destructive, of both the inhabited space and its inhabitants. Drawing on concepts commonly considered “economic”; i.e. production, consumption, exchange, and property the following questions will be explored in this course: i) Does anthropological research confirm the universality of these concepts in human communities across history and geography as assumed by political and economic philosophers? ii) In what ways are the experiences, and hence understandings of, production, consumption, exchange, and property being transformed by the processes termed “neoliberalism”? How are these changes shaping the ways in which older and newer dispossessed groups may or may not inhabit the world? Readings for the course will include philosophical and anthropological texts. {S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 0
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 0
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No

    A study of the major writers and diverse literary traditions of modern Africa with emphasis on the historical, political and cultural contexts of the emergence of writing, reception and consumption. We pay particular attention to several questions: in what contexts did modern African literature emerge? Is the term “African literature” a useful category? How do African writers challenge Western representations of Africa? How do they articulate the crisis of independence and postcoloniality? How do women writers reshape our understanding of gender and the politics of resistance? Writers include Chinua Achebe, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Nadine Gordimer, Njabulo Ndebele and Ama Ata Aidoo. We also watch and critique films such as Blood Diamond,District 9, Tsotsi and The Constant Gardener. {L}
    Linked Course: No
    AFR Crosslist, AFS Crosslist, ENG Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 10
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 2:45 PM-4:00 PM / HATFLD 205

    A survey of Japanese literature from the late 19th century to the present. Over the last century and a half, Japan has undergone tremendous change: rapid industrialization, imperial and colonial expansion, occupation following its defeat in the Pacific War, and emergence as a global economic power. The literature of modern Japan reflects the complex aesthetic, cultural and political effects of such changes. Through our discussions of these texts, we also address theoretical questions about such concepts as identity, gender, race, sexuality, nation, class, colonialism, modernism and translation. All readings are in English translation. {L}
    Linked Course: No
    EAS Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 15
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 11
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:25 AM-10:40 AM / BASS 211

    In sections limited to 15 students each, this course primarily provides systematic instruction and practice in reading and writing academic prose, with emphasis on argumentation. The course also provides instruction and practice in conducting research and in public speaking. Particular sections of this course are designed to support nonnative speakers and bilinguals, who are strongly encouraged to consider those sections. Priority is given to incoming students in the fall-semester sections. Course may be repeated for credit with another instructor.  WI
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 19
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:25 AM-10:40 AM / HILLYR 109

    An exploration of the worlds of the Victorian novel, from the city to the country, from the vast reaches of empire to the minute intricacies of the drawing room. Attention to a variety of critical perspectives, with emphasis on issues of narrative form, authorial voice,and the representation of race, class, gender and disability. Novelists will include Brontë,Collins, Dickens, Eliot and Kipling. {L}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 9
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor PermissionReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:20 PM-4:00 PM / MCCONN 104

    Same as AFR 360. This seminar focuses on Toni Morrison’s literary production. In reading her novels, essays, lectures and interviews, we pay particular attention to three things: her interest in the epic anxieties of American identities; her interest in form, language and theory; and her study of love. {L}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    AFR Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 9
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Writing Sample RequiredReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:20 PM-4:00 PM / WRIGHT 002

    Topics course. Same as AMS 351. A writing sample and permission of the instructor are required. Enrollment limited to 12. 

    Women have historically exerted their voice and power through writing, even as the professional writing trades of journalism and publishing have historically been unwelcoming of their presence. This class examines reporting and writing by and about women, and engages students in the practice of writing about gender, feminism, and women's lives. This is a workshop class where students produce their own research and reported magazine-style writing, while simultaneously inspecting how the media represents women's issues and learning the history of women writers in American journalism. As we examine these works, we grapple with questions of interviewing, structure, ethics, fair representation and more. This critical approach informs the course's workshop component, in which students compose and revise their own stories, receiving feedback from peers as well as the instructor. {A}{L}{S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    AMS Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 23
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:25 AM-10:40 AM / MCCONN B15

    Associated with female viewership, melodramas and soap operas are seen as low-quality content in the U.S. market. Melodramas and soaps originating from different parts of the world bear a similar mark of “non-quality.” This coupling of geographical origin and genre hierarchies to emphasize the difference of “the West” from “the rest” is also relevant for the ways in which peripheral content is categorized as “soap operas” and “telenovelas.” By exploring melodramatic films and TV shows, this course surveys the roots of melodrama as a genre and analyzes the power hierarchies around it with reference to gender and race.  {A}
    Linked Course: Yes
    SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 17
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:10 PM-2:35 PM / WRIGHT 238

    Could a Jane Austen heroine ever marry a servant? What notions about class, decorum or identity dictate what seem to be choices of the heart? How are individual desires shaped or produced by social, historical and cultural forces, by dominant assumptions about race, class, gender or sexuality? How do dominant love stories both reflect these assumptions, and actively create or legislate the boundaries of what may be desired? How may nondominant (queer or interracial) love stories contest those boundaries, creating alternative narratives and possibilities? This course explores how notions of love, romance, marriage or sexual desire are structured by specific cultural and historical formations. We closely analyze literature and film from a range of locations: British, American and postcolonial. Required texts: Jane Austen’s Persuasion, Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Americanah, Shyam Selvadurai’s Funny Boy. We also read some theoretical essays to provide concep {L} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    CLT Crosslist, ENG Crosslist, SWG Crosslist, WLT Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 16
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 8:00 AM-9:15 AM / SEELYE 304

    This seminar introduces students to the trailblazing women who have changed the American social and political landscape through reform, mobilization, cultural interventions and outright rebellion. We use a variety of texts: No Turning Back by Estelle Freedman, primary sources from the archives and the SCMA, films, a walking tour and local events. The intention of this seminar is threefold: (1) to provide an overview of feminist ideas and action throughout American history, (2) to introduce students to primary documents and research methods, and (3) to encourage reflection and discussion on current gender issues. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students.  {H}{S} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 15
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:50 AM-12:05 PM / SEELYE 102

    In the United States and abroad, in the past and today, the nature and scope of women's education are deeply connected to religious, economic, and social norms and beliefs. Why and how we educate women are interdisciplinary questions that draw in fascinating ways on issues of national identity and culture. In this seminar, we will explore the history and sociology of this subject, beginning in our own country, at the very start of America's public school system, and ending with a global perspective, considering the challenges of educating women in countries where female literacy is still deeply contested. Students will do in depth research in the Sophia Smith collection and college archives. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students.  WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    EDC Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 15
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 2:45 PM-4:00 PM / SEELYE 204

    A cancer diagnosis immerses patients in specialized jargon, complex treatments, and contentious discourses. Pink Ribbons. Red Devil. “Fu*k Cancer.” FOLFOX. The “good” cancer. “losing the battle.” In this first year seminar, we will interrogate cancer discourses, including common representations and refutations made by cancer patients and cancer experts. We will approach our topic by centering cancer patients, especially those who experience marginalization. Sources include essays, films, websites, brochures, letters, memoirs, art, fiction, journalism, plants, scientific data, and peer reviewed scholarship, and we will learn to strengthen our reading, writing, speaking, and research skills. Enrollment limited to 16 first-years. (E) {H}{S} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    HSC Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: FY SemSection Enrollment: 11
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 10:50 AM-12:05 PM / SAGE 15

    How can we reimagine, reconstruct, understand a historical personage? How do we perceive and get to “know” such a figure, and through this knowledge, the historical moment and context in which the person lived? We examine Marie Antoinette from a variety of perspectives: archival sources, documents and letters; biographies, portraits—official and unofficial—caricatures, pornographic pamphlets, fictional works such as plays, novels and films in which she figures. The course incorporates a role-playing unit reenacting her trial, during which every member of the class plays the role of one of the important participants. Some film screenings. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students. {H}{L} WI
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to first-years
    FRN Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 17
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:50 AM-12:05 PM / HATFLD 105

    Topics course. A gateway to more advanced courses. These colloquia develop skills in expository writing and critical thinking in French. Materials include novels, films, essays and cultural documents. Students may receive credit for only one section of 230. Enrollment limited to 18. Basis for the major. Prerequisite: 220, or permission of the instructor. 

    In this course, students study fiction, memoir, slam poetry and hip-hop authored by residents of France’s multi-ethnic suburbs and housing projects, also known as the banlieues and cités. We examine the question of whether banlieue authors can escape various pressures: to become native informants; to write realistic rather than fantastical novels; to leave the “ghetto”; to denounce the sometimes difficult traditions, religions, neighborhoods and family members that have challenged but also molded them. Often seen as spaces of regression and decay, the banlieues nevertheless produce vibrant cultural expressions that beg the question: Is the banlieue a mere suburb of French cultural life, or more like one of its centers? {F}{L}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 12
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 2:45 PM-4:00 PM / HATFLD 202

    Topics course. 

    Pre-marital sex, adultery, divorce, birth control, cross-dressing, women’s education, women’s right to political representation—these controversial gender issues were at the core of debates over women’s changing legal, social, and cultural status and of their role in the family in 18th-century France. We will examine women’s changing role as represented in the fiction and philosophical texts of the French Enlightenment. Readings from l’Abbé Prévost, Françoise de Graffigny, Diderot, Rousseau, Isabelle de Charrière, Laclos, Olympe de Gouges, the Chevalier d'Éon, the Encyclopédie, and some legal documents and treatises. {F}{L}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 40
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 33
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 2:45 PM-4:00 PM / SEELYE 106

    A survey of European women’s experiences and constructions of gender from the French Revolution through World War I, focusing on Western Europe. Gendered relationships to work, family, politics, society, religion and the body, as well as shifting conceptions of femininity and masculinity, as revealed in novels, films, treatises, letters, paintings, plays and various secondary sources. {H}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 16
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:20 PM-2:35 PM / HATFLD 205

    Topics course. 

    This course will use gender as an analytical lens to understand key themes and periods of Latin American history, from the pre-Columbian era to present-day neoliberalism. Drawing from a variety of methodological approaches, the course will illuminate how gender has shaped social relationships, institutions, identities, and discourses in the region. It will prioritize the role of women and how their individual and collective actions have impacted Latin America. Special attention will be paid to the racial and class differences among women, and their social movement participation. Enrollment limit of 18. (E)  {H}
    Linked Course: No
    LAS Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 49
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 1:20 PM-2:35 PM / MCCONN 103

    How can psychological science help us understand how gender operates in our society? How can our understanding of the psychological research help us address structural inequalities related to gender? This course represents an introduction to what we know about the role gender plays in the everyday lives of people. In this course we will review the psychological research on how structural inequities play out in gender roles and affect the lives of boys and girls and men and women. Throughout the course we will attend to the intersection of race, class, sexual orientation, and other group memberships with gender. {N}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 10
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 9:25 AM-10:40 AM / SEELYE 107

    An exploration of Jewish women’s changing social roles, religious stances and cultural expressions in a variety of historical settings from ancient to modern times. How did Jewish women negotiate religious tradition, gender and cultural norms to fashion lives for themselves as individuals and as family and community members in diverse societies? Readings from a wide range of historical, religious, theoretical and literary works in order to address examples drawn from Biblical and rabbinic Judaism, medieval Islamic and Christian lands, modern Europe, America and the Middle East. Students' final projects involve archival work in the Sophia Smith Collection of Women's History. {H}{S}
    Linked Course: No
    JUD Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 35
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 26
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 10:50 AM-12:05 PM / BASS 210

    The sociology and history of a multiracial and ethnically stratified society. Comparative examinations of several U.S. racialized and ethnic groups. Prerequisite: SOC 101. Enrollment limited to 35. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 35
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 29
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 9:25 AM-10:40 AM / BASS 203

    An examination of the ways in which the social system creates, maintains and reproduces gender dichotomies with specific attention to the significance of gender in interaction, culture and a number of institutional contexts, including work, politics, families and sexuality. Prerequisite: SOC 101. Enrollment limited to 35. {S}
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): SOC 101
    SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 35
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 11
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W F 1:20 PM-2:35 PM / SEELYE 109

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts and theories in global political economy. It covers the history of economic restructuring, global division of labor, development, North-South state relations, and modes of resistance from a transnational and feminist perspective. Issues central to migration, borders and security, health, and the environment are central to the course. Prerequisite: SOC 101. Enrollment limited to 35. 
    Linked Course: No
    Enforced Prereq(s): SOC 101
    SAS Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 12
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 13
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor PermissionReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction Th 1:20 PM-4:00 PM / SEELYE 202

    This 300-level seminar provides an in-depth engagement with global migration. It covers such areas as theories of migration, the significance of global political economy and state policies across the world in shaping migration patterns and immigrant identities. Questions about imperialism, post-colonial conditions, nation-building/national borders, citizenship, and the gendered racialization of immigration intersect as critical contexts for our discussions. Prerequisite: SOC 101 and permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. {S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Not open to first-years and sophomores
    GSD Crosslist, SAS Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 20
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 23
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 2:45 PM-4:00 PM / HATFLD 206

    Topics course. May be repeated with a different topic. Normally offered both fall and spring semesters. 

    This course examines the medieval understanding of sex and the woman’s body within an urban context. We read medieval texts on love, medicine and women’s sexuality by Iberian and North African scholars. We investigate the ways in which medieval Iberian medical traditions have viewed women’s bodies and defined their health and illness. We also address women’s role as practitioners of medicine, and how such a role was affected by the gradual emergence of “modern” medical institutions such as the hospital and the medical profession. Prerequisite: SPN 220 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 19. {F}{H}{L}
    Linked Course: No
    MES Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 16
    Course Type: SeminarSection Enrollment: 10
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Approval: Instructor PermissionReserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction M W 1:20 PM-2:35 PM / BASS 002

    Research on intergroup relationships and an exploration of theoretical and statistical models used to study mixed interpersonal interactions. Example research projects include examining the consequences of sexual objectification for both women and men, empathetic accuracy in interracial interactions, and gender inequality in household labor. A variety of skills including, but not limited to, literature review, research design, data collection, measurement evaluation, advanced data analysis, and scientific writing will be developed. Prerequisites: PSY 201, SDS 201, SDS 220 or equivalent and PSY 202. {M}{N}{S}
    Linked Course: NoRestriction(s): Limited to juniors and seniors
    PSY Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: ColloqSection Enrollment: 13
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T 1:20 PM-4:00 PM / THEATR 114

    To act, to perform is to speculate with your body. Theatre is a transformative experience that takes performer and audience on an extensive journey in the playground of the imagination beyond the mundane world. Theatre asks us to be other than ourselves. We can for a time inhabit someone else’s skin, be shaped by another gender or ethnicity, become part of a past epoch or an alternative time and space similar to our own time but that has yet to come. As we enter this “imagined” world we investigate the normative principles of our current world. This course investigates the counterfactual, speculative, subjunctive impulse in overtly speculative drama and film with a particular focus on race and gender. We examine an international range of plays by such authors as Caryl Churchill, Tess Onwueme, Dael Orlandersmith, Derek Walcott, Bertolt Brecht, Lorraine Hansberry, Craig Lucas and Doug Wright, as well as films such as The Curious Case of Benjamin Button; Pan’s Labyrinth; Children of Men;  {A}{L}
    Linked Course: Yes
    AFR Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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  • Credits: 0Max Enrollment: 18
    Course Type: LabSection Enrollment: 13
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction W 7:00 PM-9:30 PM / THEATR 207A

    To act, to perform is to speculate with your body. Theatre is a transformative experience that takes performer and audience on an extensive journey in the playground of the imagination beyond the mundane world. Theatre asks us to be other than ourselves. We can for a time inhabit someone else’s skin, be shaped by another gender or ethnicity, become part of a past epoch or an alternative time and space similar to our own time but that has yet to come. As we enter this “imagined” world we investigate the normative principles of our current world. This course investigates the counterfactual, speculative, subjunctive impulse in overtly speculative drama and film with a particular focus on race and gender. We examine an international range of plays by such authors as Caryl Churchill, Tess Onwueme, Dael Orlandersmith, Derek Walcott, Bertolt Brecht, Lorraine Hansberry, Craig Lucas and Doug Wright, as well as films such as The Curious Case of Benjamin Button; Pan’s Labyrinth; Children of Men;  {A}{L}
    Linked Course: Yes
    AFR Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
    View Textbook Information

  • Credits: 4Max Enrollment: 999
    Course Type: LectureSection Enrollment: 5
    Waitlist Count: 0
    Reserved Seats: No
    Time/Location: Remote Instruction T Th 10:50 AM-12:05 PM / SEELYE 312

    A study of the major writers and diverse literary traditions of modern Africa with emphasis on the historical, political and cultural contexts of the emergence of writing, reception and consumption. We pay particular attention to several questions: in what contexts did modern African literature emerge? Is the term “African literature” a useful category? How do African writers challenge Western representations of Africa? How do they articulate the crisis of independence and postcoloniality? How do women writers reshape our understanding of gender and the politics of resistance? Writers include Chinua Achebe, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Nadine Gordimer, Njabulo Ndebele and Ama Ata Aidoo. We also watch and critique films such as Blood Diamond,District 9, Tsotsi and The Constant Gardener. {L}
    Linked Course: No
    AFR Crosslist, AFS Crosslist, ENG Crosslist, SWG Crosslist
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The data in the course catalog are refreshed daily. Information concerning current and future course offerings is posted as it becomes available and is subject to change.

Smith College reserves the right to make changes to all announcements in the online Smith College Catalog Database, including changes in its course offerings, instructors, requirements for the majors and minors, and degree requirements. Course information contained herein is compiled and updated at regularly scheduled intervals by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty from data submitted by departments and programs. All data listed are as officially and formally approved by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty, the Committee on Academic Priorities and the faculty-at-large.