Visiting Poets

Camille Dungy

Camille Dungy
The title poem of Camille Dungy’s Trophic Cascade (Wesleyan Poetry Series, 2017) dares its reader to resist a connection between incremental—yet vast—changes to Yellowstone’s ecosystem following a reintroduction of gray wolves and Dungy’s thoughts on motherhood: “Don’t / you tell me this is not the same as my story. All this / life born from one hungry animal, this whole / new landscape.” The author of four collections of poetry and a book of essays, Dungy has also written extensively about the invisibility of African-American authors in the historically white-dominated field of nature writing; in 2009, she edited the anthology Black Nature: Four Centuries of African American Nature Poetry (University of Georgia Press, 2009), asserting that without the perspective of writers of color, nature writing becomes less a conversation than a monologue. Camille Dungy has received fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, Cave Canem, and Yaddo, and recently won a Guggenheim Fellowship. She lives in Colorado and is a professor in the English Department at Colorado State University.

Poetry Center Reading

Fall 2019