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Wellness Education
 

STRESS: Deep Breathing

It may sound silly that simply breathing is a way to manage stress, but the physiology of stress is such that by changing the way you breathe, you actually change your body chemistry. Shallow breaths high in your chest can trigger your physiological stress repsonse, while breathing low in your abdomen triggers your relaxation response.

The key to deep breathing is to breathe deeply from the abdomen, getting as much fresh air as possible in your lungs. When you take deep breaths from the abdomen, rather than shallow breaths from your upper chest, you inhale more oxygen. The more oxygen you get, the less tense, short of breath, and anxious you feel. So the next time you feel stressed, take a minute to slow down and breathe deeply:

  • Sit comfortably with your back straight. Put one hand on your chest and the other on your stomach.
  • Breathe in through your nose. The hand on your stomach should rise. The hand on your chest should move very little.
  • Exhale through your mouth, pushing out as much air as you can while contracting your abdominal muscles. The hand on your stomach should move in as you exhale, but your other hand should move very little.
  • Continue to breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth. Try to inhale enough so that your lower abdomen rises and falls. Count slowly as you exhale.

If you have a hard time breathing from your abdomen while sitting up, try lying on the floor.  Put a small book on your stomach, and try to breathe so that the book rises as you inhale and falls as you exhale.

 

Managing Stress

Daily Strategies

Meditation Practice

Acupressure

Deep Breathing

Progressive Muscle Relaxation

Self-Massage

Resources

 

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