Behind The Scenes

The multimedia, interactive nature of a computer program is different from written text. It opens exciting opportunities for developing teaching and learning materials. It also necessitates new kinds of collaborations. The author has found these collaborations with the technology itself, and with the many talented computer programmers who worked on the program to be critical to the quality, strength and success of Thinking With A Line (TWAL).

Visit Smith College http://www.smith.edu/ and the many on-campus sites that played a roll in creating the Thinking With A Line CD-ROM.

• Educational Technology, EDC 333, offered through the Department of Education and Child Study http://www.smith.edu/educ/ was the catalyst for the program. Through this course, the author began to see the potential that multi-media programming holds for making the teaching/learning process come alive.

• Smith College students from the Department of Education and Child Study http://www.smith.edu/educ/ videotaped children and teachers in action and developed several lessons for this program during their practicum experiences in The Teaching of Visual Arts EDC 305.

• Research, explorations with children and video taping took place at: The Center for Early Childhood Education (CECE) http://www.smith.edu/sccs/earlychild/childhoodcenter.html and at The Smith College Campus School (SCCS) http://www.smith.edu/sccs/

• All of the programming for Thinking With A Line, editing of video and audio recordings, and creation of this website took place at The Center for Foreign Languages and Cultures (CFLAC) at Smith College. http://www.smith.edu/cflac/support/faculty.html Most of the work was done by student interns.

• Several fine arts images in the program are from the Smith College Museum of Art http://www.smith.edu/artmuseum