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Course Offerings

The school reserves the right to withdraw or modify courses as necessary. Courses are offered over a five-week term; those listed with two course numbers (e.g., 101/102) use a 10-week syllabus.

Textbook information is in progress and should be completed by April 2014. Note that textbook information is general, not specific, for multi-section courses; students are advised to obtain specific textbook information via BannerWeb when it becomes available in the spring.

Updated 3/7/2014

Courses

101/102 Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families
(Practice; 6 credits)

This course will address the fundamental purposes, functions, and methods of social work practice with individuals and families. Links to social work practice with groups, agencies and communities are made in this course, as well as linkages to select policy and research issues. This course will focus on developing practice knowledge, values and skills applicable to practice with individuals and families which are also applicable to practice at all levels of scale (micro-, mezzo-, and macro-). These include: relationship building, data collection, strengths assessment, problem formulation, intermediate and final goal setting, contracting, work with collaterals, resource development, a range of interventions, and practice monitoring and evaluation. Attention will also be given to the stages of intervention, the use of self in helping relationships, modifications in approaches based on racial and cultural variation, experience of social oppression, selection of most relevant interventions and modalities, as well as policy-and agency-based considerations affecting practice, including time-limits, outreach, supervision and case advocacy. Case materials reflecting individual and family practice in a range of service settings and a range of populations at risk are presented. The course will address psychosocial assessment from psychodynamic, family, and social-contextual theoretical perspectives and provide an introduction to the specialization of the School: clinical social work. Issues of social and economic justice are also integrated with individual and family practice. Ten week required course first summer. Three quarter-hours each term.

130 Theories of Individual Development
(HBSE; 2 credits)

This course will introduce students to the psychodynamic theories that best explicate individual psychological development over the life cycle from a biopsychosocial perspective. These theories, taught from an historical perspective, include drive theory, ego psychology, object relations and attachment theory, self psychology, and psychosocial life cycle theories. Differences in male and female development will be discussed. Particular attention is given to sources of development of individual strength and resilience. Students will begin to learn to critique and compare theories for their applications to and usefulness for social work practice, as they reflect particular sets of values and intersect with ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual orientation, religion, age, disability, and other forms of diversity. The course will bridge theoretical constructs to contemporary practice settings. The course will integrate psychodynamic theories with brief therapy treatment approaches. Required course first summer. Two quarter-hours.

131 Problems in Biopsychosocial Functioning
(HBSE; 2 credits)

This course will draw upon the individual personality theories taught in 130, Theories of Individual Development, to provide a context in which to understand problems in biopsychosocial functioning. The course will provide students with an opportunity to explore how the relationships between biological, psychological, and environmental factors can lead to the development of individual problems in functioning. Students will learn some of the tools with which to make descriptive developmental assessments in examining psychosis, personality disorders, depressive disorders, and anxiety disorders, as well as how ethnicity, race, social class, gender, sexual orientation, age, religion, and other social variables intersect with assessment and practice issues. Required course first summer. Two quarter-hours.

132 Family Theory for Clinical Social Work Practice
(HBSE; 2 credits)

Theories framing the foundation for social work practice with families are explored and critiqued as they assist in understanding (1) the relationship between the family and its environment, (2) intergenerational family culture, structure, and process; (3) family life cycle processes; (4) internal family organization and process and (5) individual family meanings and narratives. Attention will be given to those theories that have dominated the early family therapy movement as well as newer epistemological positions and concepts deriving from more current feminist and social constructionist critiques. Implications for clinical practice are addressed. Cross-cutting the exploration of family theory are issues of culture, ethnicity, race, gender, socioeconomic status, religion, sexual orientation, age, disability as well as varying family forms. Topics related to gay and lesbian families, divorce, remarriage and single parenting will also be explored. The interface between family theories and the promotion of social justice concerns is addressed. Required course first summer. Two quarter-hours.

133 Sociocultural Concepts
(HBSE; 2 credits)

This course will introduce students to the sociocultural concepts that define the context of human experience. While exploring the broad thematic areas of culture, social structures, inter-group relationships and identity, concepts of ethnicity, race, class, gender, sexual orientation, religion, age, and disability will be explored so as to understand how these variables impact individual lives. Implications for practice will be explored. Special attention will be given to the uses and misuses of power in constructing social identities and meanings as well as personal and group experiences, and to the ways that social identity and position affect access to services and resources. Required course first summer. Two quarter-hours.

160/161 Introduction to Social Welfare Policy
(Policy; 4 credits)

This is the foundation course, representing two of three policy courses required of M.S.W. students. The course is designed as an introduction to the field of social welfare in the United States and the development of the social work profession. The course provides a framework for the analysis of social welfare policy and then uses that framework to explore selected social policy areas. Part of the framework involves an examination of the history both of social welfare in the United States and of the social work profession. Finally, the course offers an opportunity to view social work in an international context. Attention will also be paid to ways in which social workers can advocate for needed policy changes. Required course first summer. Two quarter-hours each term.

190 Group Theory and Practice
(HBSE/Practice; 2 credits)

This course introduces students to the history of social group work and focuses on applying the values, skills, and knowledge of the social work profession to a variety of groups. Theoretical and practical principles of group work are introduced to enhance understanding and use of group as a complex system of roles and interrelationships. Students learn how to construct task and treatment groups and how to mobilize the resources of existing groups. Primary focus is given to those dynamics which are common to all groups, and students will begin to explore how issues of difference (gender, race, sexual orientation, age, culture, class, ability, religion) affect group processes. Required course first summer. Two quarter-hours.

191 Agency and Community Practice
(HBSE/Policy/Practice; 2 credits)

This course will introduce students to the macro-component for community-based practice. It will introduce students to selected concepts from organizational theory that help them understand and bring about change in human service organizations. It will also introduce students to the processes of community development, organizing, planning, empowerment, and change -- to bring about change at the community level. It will provide conceptual frameworks that support ways that clinical social workers can change organizations and communities. Finally, it will prepare students for and provide knowledge, skills and tools to engage in practice aimed at promoting social and economic justice. Reqired course taken in the second term of the first summer. Two quarter-hours.

301/302 Clinical Social Work Practice
(Practice; 4 credits)

This course builds upon the academic and clinical foundations of the introductory practice course and the first year field placement and develops more intensively and precisely the biopsychosocial framework for assessment and intervention. Students will learn to assess clients' functioning using a psychodynamic developmental model, descriptive diagnosis and social theories which explore the fit between person and environment. The course will focus primarily on clinical interventions with individual adult and adolescent clients. Students will examine the practice implications of different theoretical frameworks with particular attention to the usefulness of these theoretical and practice models with populations at risk. In addition, critical aspects of the therapeutic relationship which promote growth and change, the application of social work values and evaluation of practice are areas of focus. Ten week required course second summer. Two quarter-hours each term.

330 Child Development from Infancy to Adolescence in its Social Context
(HBSE; 2 credits)

This foundation course will examine the bio-psycho-social development of children and adolescents as a basis for understanding: (a) cognitive and affective developments allowing the child to construct individual and social life at increasingly complex levels of differentiation and affiliation, (b) the use of those developmental levels as paradigms for healthy functioning, (c) a range of childhood experiences which may enhance or deter well-being and development, and (d) the utility of normal child development as a heuristic for understanding developmentally based theories of bio-psycho-social difficulties. The course illustrates compares, and contrasts fallibilistic realist and constructivist approaches to knowledge development. Values and ethical issues related to these approaches are identified and related to practice illustrations. Particular attention will be paid to issues of self-regulation, internal representation, affect, cognition, relatedness, and separation. The tasks of infancy, early childhood, latency, and early adolescence are examined in the contexts of family and peer relationships and values and in relation to influences of gender, race, ethnicity, social class, sexual orientation, religion, age, disability, and other cultural forces on the developing child. Issues of strengths, resilience, vulnerability, and dysfunction in the developing child are addressed. All of these themes are illustrated through practice application involving children and adults. A critical stance is encouraged in which various ideas and theories are examined in relation to the values they imply, the sociocultural contexts in which they develop, and their application to participants’ other courses (such as practice and racism). Required course second summer for students with no prior child development course. Two quarter-hours.

331 Comparative Psychodynamic Theories for Clinical Social Work Practice
(HBSE; 2 credits)

This course will introduce and compare psychodynamic principles within their social and historical contexts. We will present and compare the theoretical approaches of drive, ego, object relations, and self psychology as they help us to theoretically understand the developmental origins of psychopathology. We will also compare these theories for their utility in social work practice. Attention will be paid to the application of these theories with oppressed and vulnerable clients, and to the impact of trauma on development. The complexities of race, class, gender, and culture will be woven into our discussions about psychodynamic theories and practice. Finally, we will use these theories to understand a range of social identity as they emerge in practice as well as in everyday life. Required course second summer. Two quarter-hours.

333 Developmental Deviations in Childhood and Adolescence
This course is not currently offered
(HBSE; 2 credits)

This course examines deviations in childhood and adolescence from a biopsychosocial developmental perspective. A range of psychodynamic, cognitive, and other relevant theories will be studied as they shed light on the development of child and adolescent disorders. Specific clinical entities such as pervasive developmental delays, physiological disorders, and personality, cognitive, affective, and behavior disorders are considered in terms of their etiologies and features and in relation to the practice challenges they raise. Theories are critically examined in terms of the sociocultural contexts in which they develop and the cultural values and beliefs they express. Particular attention is given to the influences of gender, race, ethnicity, and other forms of diversity on the development of deviations, as well as to the impact on children and families of various kinds of oppression and deprivation. The ways in which abuse and neglect can shape development are also examined. Required course second summer for students with prior child development courses. This course is offered to students who successfully waive out of 330 by the deadline; 333 does not run if it is under-enrolled. Two quarter-hours.

334 Racism in the United States: Implications for Social Work Practice
(HBSE; 2 credits)

This course will examine the historical and contemporary functioning of racism in the United States for their implications for social work practice. This course is founded on the person-in-environment framework, the foundational eco-systemic social work perspective that views individuals and their multiple environments as a dynamic, interactive system, in which each component affects and is affected by the other. From this perspective, an individual’s views and experiences of race and racism cannot be understood without consideration of the ways in which ideas and practices of race and racism operate within the multiple systems that constitute that individual’s environment. The course will thus examine the ways in which racism operates at the macro (structural), meso (institutional), and the micro (individual) levels within our society, with an emphasis on examinations of the multiple ways in which those systems influence, shape, and define one another. Recognizing that one’s social location influences the system of lens through which we engage clinical social work practice, students choose one of three course sections available: Dominant Culture Perspectives; Perspectives from Clinicians of Color; and Multiple Perspectives. The overarching goal of the course is to aid students in becoming effective social work practitioners attentive to the dynamics of race and racism in the clinical setting. Because main instrument of clinical practice is the clinician’s use-of-self, the course aims to encourage students to engage in critical self-reflection that is anchored in an informed analysis of the larger institutional and social structures in which they live and practice. The course will utilize a wide range of pedagogical methods, including lectures, discussions, experiential learning, and clinical case analyses. The course materials and assignment are designed to guide students in developing an on-going practice of assessment, analysis, reflection, and evaluation that informs their engagement with the individuals, institutions, and systems they will encounter in their second year field placement, as well as in student’s efforts to formulate an appropriate and effective anti-racism field assignment. The study of the complex history and contemporary functioning of race and racism in the United States and their implications for social work practice cannot be accomplished in any single course. This foundational course aims, therefore, to begin the conversations, examinations, and reflections that can aid students in developing a life-long engagement in the process of learning to become social work practitioners whose work is grounded in the principles of social justice.

380/381 Social Work Research Methods (Introductory)
(Research; 4 credits)

The two-term required course will introduce students to qualitative and quantitative research methods pertinent to social work. Principles of research methodology will be emphasized. This course constitutes foundation content in the research sequence. The emphasis in the first term will be on flexible and fixed research designs, ethics, evidence-based practice, sampling and data collection methods. Emphasis in the second term will be on the presentation, analysis and interpretation of data with learning experiences using the electronic classroom. The importance of knowledge development for the profession is emphasized throughout. In addition to a research methods text, recent studies drawn from social work literature will be read and discussed. Course objectives will be met through activities in classroom, the electronic classroom and through individual written assignments in which students apply research knowledge and skills in an area of social work which interests them. The goals of this course are: (1) to develop critical thinking and knowledge of the basic principles of the scientific method; (2) to learn a range of research methods relevant to clinical social work and practice evaluation; including evidence-based practice; (3) to read research reports critically; (4) to learn the basic processes and skills necessary to the conduct of professionally relevant research and evaluation; (5) to articulate ethical issues in research and understand methods to apply them and (6) to learn a range of skills to incorporate the impact of human diversity in all aspects of research. The course prepares students for the application of research knowledge and skills in the required Research Project (Thesis). Required course second summer for students with little prior research background. Two quarter-hours each term.

382/383 Social Work Research Methods (Intermediate)
(Research; 4 credits)

The two-term required course will introduce students to qualitative and quantitative research methods pertinent to social work. Principles of research methodology will be emphasized. This course constitutes foundation content in the research sequence. The emphasis in the first term will be on flexible and fixed research designs, ethics, evidence-based practice, sampling and data collection methods. Emphasis in the second term will be on the presentation, analysis and interpretation of data with learning experiences using the electronic classroom. The importance of knowledge development for the profession is emphasized throughout. In addition to a research methods text, recent studies drawn from social work literature will be read and discussed. In the intermediate section, some prior knowledge of research methods is assumed. Emphasis will be on review, consolidation and application of knowledge as well as on developing a clinical social work perspective on research. Course objectives will be met through activities in classroom, the electronic classroom and through individual written assignments in which students apply research knowledge and skills in an area of social work which interests them. The goals of this course are: (1) to develop critical thinking and knowledge of the basic principles of the scientific method; (2) to learn a range of research methods relevant to clinical social work and practice evaluation; including evidence-based practice; (3) to read research reports critically; (4) to learn the basic processes and skills necessary to the conduct of professionally relevant research and evaluation; (5) to articulate ethical issues in research and understand methods to apply them and (6) to learn a range of skills to incorporate the impact of human diversity in all aspects of research. The course prepares students for the application of research knowledge and skills in the required Research Project (Thesis). Two quarter-hours each term. Placement sections are based on the prior background and experience students bring to the program.

384/385 Social Work Research Methods (Advanced)
(Research; 4 credits)

The two-term required course will reintroduce students to qualitative and quantitative research methods pertinent to social work. Principles of research methodology will be emphasized. This course constitutes foundation content in the research sequence. The emphasis in the first term will be on diverse research designs, ethics, evidence-based practice, sampling and data collection methods with some data analysis techniques. Emphasis in the second term will be on the presentation, analysis and interpretation of data with learning experiences using the electronic classroom. The importance of knowledge development for the profession is emphasized throughout. In addition to a research methods text, recent studies drawn from social work literature will be read and discussed. Course objectives will be met through activities in classroom, the electronic classroom and through individual written assignments in which students apply research knowledge and skills in an area of social work which interests them. At the advanced level, strong prior knowledge of research methods is assumed. Emphasis will be on review, consolidation and application of knowledge as well as on developing a social work perspective on research. This course will build on the students’ prior experience and offers the opportunity for self- directed work and application of advanced statistics. The goals of this course are: (1) to further critical thinking and knowledge of the basic principles of the scientific method; (2) to learn a range of research methods relevant to clinical social work and practice evaluation; including evidence-based practice; (3) to read research reports critically; (4) to learn the basic processes and skills necessary to the conduct of professionally relevant research and evaluation; (5) to articulate ethical issues in research and understand methods to apply them and (6) to learn a range of skills to incorporate the impact of human diversity in all aspects of research. The course prepares students for the application of research knowledge and skills in the required Research Project (Thesis). Required course second summer for students with extensive prior research study and experience, taken instead of 380/381 or 382/383. Two quarter-hours each term. Placement sections are based on the prior background and experience students bring to the program.

Electives

306 Couple Therapy
(Practice; M)

Through didactic presentations and discussion, analysis of videotaped interviews, and experiential exercise, students will be introduced to the fundamental theories and practices of work with couples. Practice from systemic and psychoanalytic perspectives will be emphasized. The course will focus on three levels: (1) the set of expectations and promises of "models of intimacy", brought to the relationship from each partner's family of origin; (2) the problematic sequences in current interaction; and (3) the larger systemic context of significant others that serves to maintain the problem. The theoretical framework for understanding couples will draw on object relations, intergenerational, cognitive-behavioral, trauma and social constructionist perspectives. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

307 Family Therapy: Narrative Approaches to Social Work
(Practice; M)

This five week course is designed as a beginning process of integrating family therapy theories and concepts into practice. This course will present a brief overview of the family therapy field and approaches. The format will include lecture, group discussion, formal case presentations, role playing, and video presentations. Student participation is key. Vital contextual factors, such as, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, race, sexual identity, immigration and citizenship status will be discussed separately and within the practical application of the different approaches presented. This course offers opportunities for students to fortify their understanding and skill in narrative therapy and to apply specific maps of narrative practice to their own lives as social workers. Students will explore the ways stories shape lives and to experiment with practices that can open space for new stories to emerge. Amidst the various approaches to collaborative family therapy, we will focus on the work of Michael White and David Epston, and developments of their re-authoring conversations approach in Australia, New Zealand, and North America. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

308 Clinical Practice with Families: Dialogic, Feminist, and Narrative Approaches
(Practice; M; 10-week elective)

In the past decade, the field of family therapy has witnessed the emergence of new frameworks for practice based on reflection and narrative, instead of strategy and intervention. This course will examine these models, beginning with their significant debts to feminism and postmodernism. These intellectual movements challenged traditional cybernetic and systems models and provided the seeds for new forms of therapy. We will focus on Andersen's reflecting team, the Finnish dialogic-systems model, the collaborative language-based approach of the Griffiths, the narrative therapies invented by White and Epston, and the Gender and Violence Project at the Ackerman Institute. Within this overview, we will look specifically at gender, class, ethnicity, and sexual orientation as such lenses shape our descriptions of families and practice of therapy. Social justice issues and multiculturalism will be important themes. Specific clinical approaches to violence and abuse and child-focused problems will be explored. Ten-week long elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours each term.

309 Group Therapy: Theory and Practice
(Practice; M)

The purpose of this course is to develop a working theoretical base for group psychotherapy, drawing from the Interpersonal, Psychodynamic, and Group-As-Whole perspectives. The emphasis will be on long-term group psychotherapy principles, which can serve as the basis for understanding phenomena that occur in all types of groups. To a limited extent, we will consider the applicability of these theories to short-term groups. Particular attention will be paid to: group dynamics, member selection and preparation, group formation, group development, and leadership techniques. We will also examine the role and impact of projective processes in group psychotherapy and consider the influence of diversity on group dynamics. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

310 Women's Reproductive Issues in Health and Mental Health
(Practice; A)

Mental health depends on a complex interaction between genetic and psychosocial factors. In women, an added layer of complexity arises from changes in reproductive functioning (menstrual cycle, pregnancy, miscarriage, infertility, postpartum, perimenopause). Not only are women who present with psychiatric symptoms during reproductive periods more sensitive to hormonal changes, but these reproductive periods can also cause psychological stress. For instance, role transitions precipitated by pregnancy and menopause can challenge a woman’s relationships and sense of identity. Likewise, the physical and sexual changes occurring during reproductive periods can trigger issues pertaining to body image or sexual abuse. In this course, case material will be used to illustrate the kinds of mental health issues related to reproductive functioning that present in women in psychotherapy. We will use a biopsychosocial approach to understand how and why reproductive functioning contributes to the development of these mental health issues. Based on this understanding, we will discuss specific techniques that can be used in psychotherapy sessions to help women facing these challenges. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

311 The Role of Religion and Spirituality in Clinical Social Work
(Practice; Free)

The goal of this course is to acquaint the student with predominant theories regarding religion and spirituality for the "person-in-the-situation." Particular attention will be given to the function of spirituality and religion in bridging internal and external adaptations throughout the life cycle. Theoretical orientations will include psychodynamic, philosophical and sociocultural. The implications of these theories will be examined in terms of their impact on clinical practice. Students are encouraged to bring case material. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

312 Social Work Practice with Older Adults
(Policy/Practice; O/A)

The anticipated surge in the size and cultural diversity of the U.S. population of older adults has generated intensive examination by the mental health and social service professions about our preparedness for responding to these changes. This course will focus on the application of a range of theories and models of practice to support clinical work with older adults, including: narrative gerontology, psychodynamic developmental theories, and cognitive behavioral theory. We will also include some attention to existentialist, Jungian and mindfulness practices. We will address significant issues in the social and cultural contexts of aging, including: the dynamics of ageism in different cultural contexts, the effects of historical and generational events on different cohorts, and the social dynamics of potential intergenerational collaboration and conflict. The evolution of such contested issues as: the distribution of economic resources, use of computer technology, increased attention to community-building efforts, and greater demand for integrative and preventive health care will have profound effects on the well-being of our older adult population. In this course, we will look at specific examples from student cases, films, autobiographies, and expert informants to consider how clinical models and appreciation of the sociocultural context can be integrated to respond to the mental health needs of this dramatically increasing population. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

313 An Introduction to Cognitive Behavioral Practice
(Practice; Free)

This elective course will focus on cognitive behavioral practice as related to evidence based practice. The material covered will include an introduction to and critical analysis of the family of theories which fit into the cognitive behavioral rubric including social learning theory, behavioral theories and cognitive theories of inter- and intrapersonal functioning. Theories will be examined from their genesis to their clinical applications with a goal of assessment of each for fit with particular client problems, therapeutic relationships, situations and contexts based upon empirical research. Theories will also be assessed for racist, sexist, ageist and other oppressive and unjust assumptions and uses. The seminar process will be focused upon the learning of cognitive behavioral methods including cognitive restructuring, contracting, Socratic questioning, thought stopping, motivational interviewing and behavioral reward systems. Use of self and relationship as well as models of integration across theories and methods will also be emphasized throughout the seminar. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

314 Dialogic and Narrative Theory and Practice
(A/M)

Over the past fifteen years, the field of family therapy has witnessed the emergence of new frameworks for practice based on reflection and narrative, instead of strategy and intervention. This course will examine these models, beginning with their significant debts to feminism and postmodernism. These intellectual movements challenged traditional cybernetic and systems models and provided the seeds for new forms of therapy. We will focus on Andersen's reflecting team, the Finnish dialogic-systems model, the narrative therapies invented by White and Epston, and the Gender and Violence Project at the Ackerman Institute. Within this overview, we will look specifically at gender, class, ethnicity, and sexual orientation as such lenses shape our descriptions of families and practice of therapy. Social justice issues and multiculturalism will be important themes. Specific clinical approaches to violence and abuse and child-focused problems will be explored. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

315 Working with Separating and Divorcing Families: Co-parenting Contexts and Interventions
(Practice; A/M)

This course examines separation and divorce among parents with minor children as common life transitions that pose serious challenges to family adaptation as well as opportunities for growth. The course will focus on separation and family reorganization, emphasizing the individual, relational and societal factors that contribute to co-parenting harmonies and disharmonies that support or undermine child adjustment. Students will examine diverse family structures; risk and resilience frameworks for understanding family adjustment; the role of parental conflict; clinical skills utilized in psycho-legal interventions; and the roles social workers play in current family law practice. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

316 Community-based Practice with Children and Families
(Practice; O)

In this course we will be exploring the skills and issues involved in working with children and families in a community based clinic, agency or practice. We will be using a framework grounded in the biopsychosocialspiritual model of social work to enter into a dialogue about community based interventions that will help you address a multitude of issues across many domains. Issues related to assessment, treatment planning and in-the-room interventions, coping with untreated or chronic individual and family trauma(s), vicarious traumatization, agency protocols, policies, and pressures, case management, transference/counter-transference issues, and working with clients’ spiritual beliefs and practices, among others, will be covered. Expect an interactive class that will utilize case study, experiential exercises and learning concrete skills to effectively work with children and their families in a community based setting. Two quarter-hours.

317 Group Treatment for Children and Young Adolescents
(Practice; M)

This course will address theme-centered psycho-educational groups, as well as time-limited and long-term activity-interview, and play therapy groups. The therapist's role in different models of group treatment will be considered, with particular emphasis on group structure, composition, modes of communication, limit-setting, transference, countertransference, creating a therapeutic group culture, and stages of group development. Students will be encouraged to share their experiences in working with child and adolescent groups and to participate in role playing designed to address problematic group process issues. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

318 Managing Ethnicities: A Socio Legal History of Immigration to the U.S.
(Policy/Practice; O/A/S)

Because immigration has been a central discriminating mechanism through which this selective peopling of the nation has been accomplished, the history of immigration and immigrants is a site par excellence for the examination of the mechanisms through which the contemporary issues of diversity, “difference,” and marginalization of populations were and continue to be accomplished. This seminar will undertake this examination through the review of the socio-legal history of immigration. The course will review major U.S. legislation concerning immigrants and immigration, refugees and asylum, and citizenship and naturalization. The legal codes will be analyzed through the lens of theory, in particular poststructuralist theories of discourse and identity, as a means through which to examine the profession’s current practices with newcomers and the broader issues of diversity and difference within which they are framed. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

320 Collective Trauma: The Impact of Intercommunal Violence on Individuals, Communities, and Cultures
(HBSE/Practice; Free)

This course is designed to introduce students to information, concepts, and controversies critical to understanding the impact of massive violence on individuals and groups of people. Throughout the course understanding the impact of such violence will be coupled with the question of what people, and cultures, need to recover. Widespread violence threatens the constituent elements of individual and community life, especially when the violence is between communitities and targets civilians, as in Rwanda or Bosnia. Each individual caught in such violence has to begin a new life which in some way incorporates the destruction and violation which have occurred, and communities also have to reestablish, or even create, conditions for resuming viable community life. During the course we will consider what enables recovery as we look at mass violence in a number of ways. We will consider the changing nature of warfare, and detail the impact of intercommunal violence (including specific ways women and children are affected). We will consider the role of group identity in the generation of mass violence, and the ways in which violence and the terror it generates affect the subsequent group identities of conflictants (for example, the impact of the 1994 genocide on ethnic identity in Rwanda; the impact of September 11 on the national identities of US citizens). We will look at ongoing impact, through issues such as intergenerational transmission, and group memory of horror. We will look in detail at the controversies surrounding the use by the humanitarian field of concepts such as trauma and PTSD to delineate the effects of mass violence, and consider other frameworks. We will look in depth at some of the ways people and communities get caught in cycles of revenge and violence, and then look at the stages which individuals and communities go through in moving toward peaceful coexistence. We will consider (particularly at the start of the course and again at the end) the impact of working with the issue of mass violence (confronting the brutal facts, working with those involved, etc) upon ourselves as students, workers, and human beings. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

322 Beyond Combat: Clinical Social Work Theory and Practice Models
(HBSE/Practice; A)

This elective course draws from research data that explore the effects of deployment and combat stress on the physical and mental health of active duty U.S. service members and their families. Therapy modalities grounded in a synthesis of trauma, attachment, object relations, family and cognitive-behavioral theories include a range of approaches (i.e. individual, couple/family, group and clinical case management). Attention to issues of diversity, ethics and use of “professional self” will be included throughout all clinical case discussions. Clinical issues involve intimate partner violence, intergenerational transmission of legacies of combat trauma, military sexual assault and complex responses of PTSD, other anxiety disorders, depression/suicidality and substance abuse. Managing secondary trauma and the role of transference/countertransference phenomena are central in all discussions. Priority is given to students who have worked with or who anticipate working with soldiers, Marines and their families. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

323 Aging in America: Social Work Practice with Older Adults within the Context of Family and Society
This course is not currently offered
(Policy/Practice; A)

This course will address both clinical practice and social policy issues related to older adults in America. We will analyze and develop policy structures for addressing the clinical issues associated with aging as individuals, families and communities experience it across gender, race and class. Policy here will mean the mechanisms of action to address particular problems associated with growing older in American ranging from clinical issues such as depression and dementia to broader problems of social stability associated with retirement. We will focus on the clinical concerns facing older adult, their families and caregivers, and the policies and the development of programs that enhance or constrain the attainment and preservation of their well being. Two quarter-hours.

324 Social Work Treatment with Adolescents in Culture and Context
(Practice; M)

This course will provide a basic theoretical framework for understanding the complex phenomenon of adolescence within developmental, relational and cultural perspectives. While attachment, contemporary relational, developmental, and family systems theories will be the main underpinnings of the course, additional relevant perspectives will be introduced. Students will examine clinical settings in which adolescents are typically encountered along with treatment modalities considered effective with this population. Special attention will be paid to issues of race and class, along with the interplay between trends in teen culture and society. The relational world of teens will be explored in depth in order to enhance students’ understanding of the challenges and possibilities in adolescent treatment relationships. Finally, students will be introduced to aspects of the psychotherapeutic treatment relationship unique to this population. Overall, this course aims to expand students’ frame of reference for understanding adolescence in the social environment, including the subcultures in which it is embedded, and the systems with which it interfaces. Students will consider how to intervene creatively and effectively in these contexts. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

325 Social Work in American Health Care
(Practice; A)

Unlike most industrialized western democracies, the American Healthcare System has evolved in the absence of a guaranteed right of citizens (and certainly non-citizens) to access care. While the next few years may bring transformation, the complexity of today's system can seem daunting to patients and their families. Non-native cultures may find the gap between patient expectations and treatment delivery even more profound. The professional social worker, via counseling, educating, advocating, and facilitating can help inject humanity into what otherwise might seem a fragmented and impersonal system. This course will examine the structure and processes of healthcare organizations, financing medicine, and the importance of measuring healthcare outcomes. Special attention will be paid to effective practice techniques with other cultures. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours

326 Social Work and the Schools: Making the Marriage Work
(Practice; Free)

The primary goal of this course is to examine, assess, and develop skills in the implementation of social work policy and practice in the public education setting. Whether a clinician is employed in the school setting, or in a child welfare agency, the school experience is an integral part of every client’s identity and exerts a significant influence on one’s functional capacity. For some, the school experience itself is traumatizing; for others, it is a welcome refuge from trauma in the environment. Understanding the impact of the school setting enhances the social worker’s effectiveness whether working in schools or in clinical social work settings. Practice issues to be explored and discussed include: * Working with “teams” * Examining school-based problem areas * Working with individuals, groups, and families * Working with special needs population with the framework of legal mandates * Consultation, crisis intervention, and coordination of services * School/family/community collaboration Through a variety of methods, this course will help you examine a range of policy and practice issues related to the delivery of social work services in the school setting. School social work professional standards, program development and licensure receive attention as well. An ecological and risk and resiliency framework for practice will be emphasized throughout the course. Furthermore, students will examine the role of school social workers in light of their own educational experience as well as participate in role plays of situations which typically arise at the elementary, middle, and high school level. Two quarter-hours

327 Clinical Social Work with Children
(Practice; Free)

Comprehensive treatment of children evolves from a comprehensive diagnostic and developmental assessment, which in turn gives purpose and direction to therapeutic methods, goals, and planning. Such an assessment should be based on the influence of structural, dynamic, community, and genetic factors on a child’s presentation, as well as the child’s, and his or her family’s, strengths and resources. In addition, clinical social work with children inevitably involves work with multiple systems, which may include schools, child protective services, and courts. It is important for us as social workers to understand how our clients perceive and work with, or against, these systems, and how such systems work with, or against our clients. This course deals with the treatment of children based on an understanding of psychoanalytic and systemic theories, as well as theories of how culture, in all of its vicissitudes, shapes and informs the experiences of children in their lives and in therapy. The course will also introduce students to the different phases of treatment with children, the symbolic communication of children as expressed through play, and the impact of trauma and early attachment failures on a child’s developing brain and personality. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

328 Clinical Approaches to Addiction: How to Motivate, Reduce Harm and (Eventually) Sober Up Your Clients
This course is not currently offered
(Practice; M)

Working with clients with addiction problems can be an endless source of uncertainty and frustration-but also of exhilaration, insight and hope. Addicted persons are often confronting multiple, complex problems, from the denial of the addiction itself, to legacies of early trauma and abuse, to histories of broken relationships with parents, spouses, and children. Making matters more confusing, the treatment field is too often splintered into different approaches, each with its own competing claims. This course presents an integrative approach that builds a much-needed bridge between family therapy, psychodynamic treatment, narrative and postmodern approaches, trauma theory and addictions counseling. Innovative, flexible ways to help clients form new understandings of what has happened in their lives, explore their relationships to drugs and alcohol, and develop new stories to guide and nourish their recovery are demonstrated. Topics covered include: The role of AA and Al-Anon in providing meaning and support, treating addicted survivors of trauma and abuse, applications to adolescent and child therapy, problems that surface in family interventions and consultation, dealing with overlapping substance abuse and eating disorders, working with “non-tissue based addictions (e.g, gambling, sex, the internet, etc.), and issues facing care givers who are themselves in recovery. Special attention is given to race, gender, class, sexual orientation and other issues of culture and power that surface in the treatment of diverse individuals. Elective course in second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

329 Work with Youth and Families: Evidence-Based Multitheoretical Approaches
This course is not currently offered
(Practice; Free)

This course is designed to prepare direct practice clinicians for work with children and families, using models derived from varying theoretical perspectives (e.g., psychodynamic/relationship-based, cognitive-behavioral, narrative, bodywork and mindfulness modalities) -- all of which have solid evidence bases for their effectiveness. The course will involve students in lecture/powerpoint or video overviews of each model, and active in-class exercises where the instructor will present actual cases for assessment, case formulation, treatment planning, development and practice of appropriate interventions, and posttreatment evaluation. Although trauma as one presenting problem will be covered, the most typical presenting problems encountered by clinicians at each age level -- and examples of methods currently considered among the most effective for treating them--will also be included. Elective course in second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

335 Crisis Intervention
(HBSE/Practice; Free)

This elective introduces various clinical social work approaches to crisis intervention that are grounded in a range of theoretical models within social context, i.e., crisis, attachment, object relations; ego psychology; cognitive-behavioral; and multi-systemic. Critical events include: large scale domestic and global crisis; para-suicidal and suicidal behavior; acute psychiatric symptomatology; effects of witnessing homicide and other violence on children/adolescents; effects of witnessing and engaging in combat; domestic violence; catastrophic illness or accident; and violence in the workplace. Students will learn to differentiate between disaster management and crisis intervention. Rapid biopsychosocial assessments will be completed to guide the development of a case-specific treatment plans. Focus is placed on the identified client in the context of his/her family support network. The intersection of social work values and ethics along with diversity and sociocultural themes are considered throughout the course. Clinical case material and videotapes will be used to facilitate classroom dialogue. Elective course in second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

337 Neurobiology and Clinical Social Work
(HBSE; Free)

The purpose of this course is to synthesize contemporary literature that demonstrates the increasing relevance of neurobiology findings on clinical practice, with a range of vulnerable populations. Using aspects of child development theory, contemporary attachment theory, trauma theory, cognitive neuroscience, and clinical theory, the course focuses on the adaptive functions of positive early relationships for the achievement of key developmental capacities. A central hypothesis of the course is there is no such thing as a “single brain” and that one’s social brain is fundamentally shaped in interaction with other people. The healing benefits of a therapeutic relationship are explicitly demonstrated. We will explore the central role of affect regulation and mentalization processes in the development of mental health. We also will explore the outcomes of disrupted attachment and trauma on brain development; in so doing, we will explore clinical implications and treatment strategies for a range of biopsychosocial disorders. Classroom methods will include lecture, small group discussion, videotapes and case presentations. Elective course in second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

338 The Role of Emotion in Therapeutic Action
This course is not currently offered
(HBSE; Free)

The purpose of this course is to integrate findings from current research in affective neuroscience, attachment theory, emotion theory, child development theory, trauma studies, and somatic focusing to explore how experiencing and processing emotion in the therapeutic dyad promotes healing and growth. A core principal of this course is founded in current neuroscience research that demonstrates the brain’s capacity to change across the life cycle – that is, the brain’s plasticity. We will explore how the therapeutic relationship becomes the matrix from which these internal neural and physiological resources, hard wired in the mind and body, can be accessed and dyadically regulated to potentiate change and transformation. The fundamental role of the attuned other in the ongoing rhythm of dyadic coordination, spontaneous rupture and repair will be made explicit through videotaped vignettes of actual therapy sessions. We will discuss and delineate the differences between healing affect and pathogenic affect. We will explore the theoretical concepts of Fosha, Siegel, & Solomon (The Healing Power of Emotion, 2009), among others, that inform the specifics of clinical stance, technique and intervention. Classroom methods will include lecture, small group discussion, videotapes and case presentation. Elective course in second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

339 Bearing Witness: Making Sense of Trauma and Traumatic Stress Responses
(HBSE; Free)

The objective of this course is to develop in students a fluency of knowledge around trauma theory which will enable them to apply themselves effectively in clinical contexts. Building on the premise that theory is an essential tool in assessment, diagnosis and intervention, a significant proportion of the course will be dedicated to building a foundation of knowledge around the seminal writings on trauma, both historical and contemporary. A core objective of the course is to identify trauma as being central to multiple areas of psychic functioning, and to link it to other bodies of knowledge such as attachment and personality theory as well as to psychoanalytic neurobiology. The course will apply theory to practice in looking through a biopsychosocial lens at the assessment and diagnosis of traumatized individuals. The notion of therapist as witness to an unfolding narrative will provide the fabric to exploring the range of interventions available. These models of intervention will be interrogated, they will be located in the relevant body of theory, and their mechanisms of action will be explored. Finally, the course will visit the concept of trauma as a crisis of meaning, and at the potential for transformation, forgiveness and healing once trauma has been re-membered, repeated and worked through. Teaching methods will include lecture, small group discussions, class presentations and media input. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

340 Psychodynamic and Cognitive Theory and Practice
(HBSE; Free)

This course will examine the key concepts in psychodynamic and cognitive theories and how they apply in practice. Students will learn to compare and contrast different interventions based on theoretical choices and to examine the stages of practice according to each theory. Two quarter-hours - Kumaria.

360 Mental Health Policy and Services
(Policy; F/S)

This course explores the social context in which emotional problems are defined and treated. Contrasting paradigms will be examined including the contribution made by each in understanding the etiology of mental health problems and the functions of treatment. Attention will be given to the special situation of women and people of color and current dilemmas in mental health policy. Current national and state laws, funding arrangements, and judicial decisions that impact on mental health programs as they affect the role of social workers in the delivery of services will be explored as well. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

361 Families and Social Policies
(Policy; F/S)

This course examines the context of public policy as it affects diverse families and influences family composition, structure, family functions and the role families play in contemporary society. Throughout this five-week course, students examine the changes in the nature of the family as a result of industrialization and other economic trends, current debates about the proper role of government intervention in family life, the differential impacts of various social policies on a diversity of families, historical and current trends in the development of family policy and comparative analyses of American and international policies. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

362 Health Policy and Services
(Policy; F/S)

In this course, we examine the U.S. health care system, its sociopolitical origins and evolution, and its complex service delivery system and financing. The topics we discuss include: (1) factors in disease causation; (2) the structure and processes of health care organizations; (3) approaches to financing medical care; (4) healhcare outcomes, including disparities. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

363 Child Welfare Policy and Services
(Policy; F/S)

This course focuses on major social and demographic changes in the family and the economy that affect the development of and impact on the construction of national and state policies designed to protect and provide for the care of children. Particular emphasis will be placed on understanding the current trends and policy issues emerging in foster care, adoption, and child abuse and neglect services. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

364 LGBTQ Identity and Social Policy
(Policy; O/S)

This course examines the intersection of social policy and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender ("LGBT") identities in a variety of contexts of importance to clinical social workers. We will study policies of general applicability that have a particular impact on LGBT individuals and families as well as those that are LGBT-specific in design. The course will focus on a range of laws, policies, and practices including those that impact family formation, child custody, youth (including in and out-of-home care), health care, incarceration, immigration, military, hate speech and bias laws, and nondiscrimination in the context of employment and public education. Students will consider the role of such policies in their own clinical experiences. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

368 Law and Social Work
This course is not currently offered
(Policy; S)

This course is designed to focus on those instances when legal mandates or concerns interact with and affect the practice of social work. It will begin with an overview of the sources of legal authority, the judicial system, and the legal standards applicable to particular proceedings. The course will then examine the legal implications of the social worker-client relationship. Specific emphasis will be placed on an examination of the statutes and judicial decisions that govern the confidentiality implicit in a social worker-client relationship and which permit or place an obligation on social workers to breach client confidentiality. Other topics include social workers as expert witnesses, risk management, and anti-discrimination laws. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

371 Family Law
(Policy; F/S)

This course will focus on the intersection between the law and families; how the legal system influences families both directly and indirectly. Legal cases will be reviewed and analyzed both from a legal and clinical social work perspective. Students will be challenged to broaden their notions of how laws, policies and legislation impact families. Discussion will be focused on specific assigned civil and criminal law cases that demonstrate defensive social work practice, civil rights, and social advocacy. Students will be introduced to the legal world and how social workers can best advocate for their clients when dealing with lawyers. This class includes role play activities, for students who accept that option, which simulate how social workers interface with the court system. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

372 International Perspectives on Social Problems and Social Policy
(Policy; F/S)

The purpose of this course is to expose students to some of the social, economic, and political factors that inform social policies and programs in development and transitional (i.e. conflict-affected) settings around the world, and to explore some of the key international social problems that have particular relevance to the field of social work. The course is accordingly organized in two parts: the first part broadly examines globalization and its effect on social welfare and human need, the fields of comparative social welfare and social development, and the linkages between human rights and social work. The second part of the course takes a closer look at selected social problems and the responses that have been developed at the international, regional, and local levels to address them. During the second part of the course and particularly in the final class, students will be encouraged to consider some of the challenges that arise when integrating western psychosocial programming and expectations with non-western cultural norms. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

373 Lobbying and Grant Writing
(Policy/Practice; S)

This course is intended to provide students with tools for advocating for their clients, their agencies and the profession. In an environment characterized by scarce resources, it is critical to identify means to increase our capacity to influence the decisions that affect us and to develop the means to pursue program initiatives. In this course, students will learn: (a) lobbying and other approaches to influencing the policy process; and (b) principles of effective proposal writing. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

374 Social Policy Challenges to Clinical Social Work and What to do about Them
This course is not currently offered
(Policy; S)

The purpose of this course is to understand and recognize the impact of social welfare policies on clinical social work practice. Students will learn how to analyze the ways in which social welfare policy is formulated and shaped and to learn the skills needed to influence policies and how they are implemented. The course will include identification and analysis of issues, policies, and programs that particularly have an impact on vulnerable client systems, who clinical social workers are likely to be working with. It is also designed to expand practice knowledge of micro, mezzo and macro interventions with vulnerable client populations for clinical social workers so that direct practice also involves policy advocacy. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

375 Social Justice and the Law: Public Policy and the Laws of the U.S.
(Policy; O/S)

In order to be an effective social change agent, one must understand the values and historical determinants of our current social/public policies and institutions. One should be able to critique and contribute to the reform of current public policy on the basis of an understanding of consistent and recurrent patterns of oppression of poor people, and discrimination against and exclusion of women, people of color, and other minority group members. This course examines the historical, philosophical, economic, and value determinants of civil rights laws in the United States and is intended to help students develop the analytical skills and knowledge base about the civil rights laws necessary for implementing direct practice activities and ethical approaches to social justice issues with clients. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

376 International Human Rights and Social Work Practice (Policy
This course is not currently offered
(Policy; O/S)

It is evident that over time states, religions, super powers, colonial regimes, dictatorial rules and economic and societal injustice have violated the Human Rights of many. It was not that long ago that United Nations asserted that “Human Rights are inherent to all human beings” and with this recognition the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was passed in 1948. However, the world has and continues to violate Human Rights of many. Ironically, nations particularly the powerful ones both promote and also violate human rights. Poverty is increasing and food shortages are rampant. Education and health care are denied to many and women and children bear the brunt of HIV/AIDS. Wars are waged, prisoners tortured, held without trails and death penalty is widely used. Intra and Inter-state conflicts render many as Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) or as refugees and asylum seekers and those who end up in the West are despised. In addition, there is a widespread social injustice against women who are forced to prostitute, children who are used as child soldiers and LGBT community and low caste people are detested. Religious intoleration is rife in the world. This increases the challenges of ensuring the rights of those marginalized. This course will critically examine the past and current practices of Human Rights in the world. We will review several International Conventions, UDHR, the role of United Nations and the contemporary challenges in the promotion of Human Rights. The course will develop a frame work comprised of social justice and cultural lenses to examine and deepen our understanding of the practices of Human Rights in the world. The course plans to strengthen the knowledge base on International Human Rights and provides opportunities to build strategies, skills and will enable Social Work practitioners to promote Human Rights in these demanding times. Elective course second and third summer. Two quarter-hours.

377 Aging Policy
(Policy; F/O/S)

In this course, we examine the social, economic and political frameworks guiding current social welfare policies that affect the rights and interests of older adults. These include policies related to economic security, health, long term care, employment, and civil rights in the field of aging. A primary focus of the course is to examine the linkages between public policies and practice as they relate to the concerns facing older adults and their families. The formulation of specific policies, the implementation of particular programs, and the development of appropriate community resources that enhance or constrain the attainment or preservation of well being will be explored in some detail. The Older Americans Act, Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid will be examined as they relate to the identified needs of present and future groups of an aging population. Through the analyses of case studies and the discussion of legislative, political and economic developments, the course will serve to define the role of the social worker within existing parameters of the policy-making process and assist practitioners in informing and empowering older people and their families. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

390 Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Identities: Developmental and Treatment Considerations
(HBSE/Practice; O)

This course is designed to help students integrate their understanding of developmental issues in the context of lesbian, gay, and bisexual identities and to examine differential diagnostic and treatment issues with this population. Psychodynamic theory and current social/psychological approaches will provide a framework for examination. Normative developmental tasks for lesbians and gay men will be addressed within a context of adolescent and adult development and from a person-environment perspective. Elective course in second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

392 DBT Theory and Practice
(HBSE/Practice; Free)

This course provides an introduction to dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). The empirical basis of the treatment will be presented, and students will develop knowledge and skills in the following areas: the biosocial theory of borderline personality disorder; dialectical theory; individual DBT and its use of validation, contingency management, diary cards, and behavioral analyses; group DBT and the four DBT skills modules (core mindfulness, emotion regulation, distress tolerance, and interpersonal effectiveness); and the roles of telephone coaching and the DBT consultation team. Instruction modalities will include lecture, class discussion and exercises, and video-recorded sessions. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

397 Race and Ethnicity in Psychodynamic Clinical Practice
(HBSE/Practice; O)

This advanced elective addresses: (a) how socialization of race and ethnicity may influence client’s subjective presenting concerns, transference, defenses and resistance, as well as the therapist’s own subjective countertransference, defenses, and resistance in the clinical encounter and therapeutic relationship, and (b) the therapist’s unique multicultural challenges in mobilizing a working alliance with her or his given client. Contemporary relational psychodynamic concepts are examined as they apply or fail to apply effectively with racially and culturally marginalized client populations. Assessment, subjective and intersubjective transference/counter-transference, defense & resistance, and the use of self in the promotion of a working alliance are emphasized. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter hours.

398 Palliative and End of Life Care for Children and Families
This course is not currently offered
(Practice; Free)

503 Senior Clinical Seminar: Populations at Risk
This course is not currently offered
(Practice; O; 3rd Summer)

The senior clinical seminars will offer students an opportunity to pursue theory and practice in depth, from different theoretical perspectives. Each seminar will focus on a particular aspect of theory and will use students' agency case material to examine central treatment premises, refine practice skills, explore therapeutic issues that have been problematic and consider the social and environmental contexts that influence clinical practice. Different sections will focus on such topics as: a) The Use of Self Psychology in Social Work Practice; b) Winnicott's Theories Applied to Social Work Practice; and c) Advanced Clinical Social Work Practice with Children. During any given academic session, several different seminars will be offered with the aim of addressing those issues and client populations that seem most relevant as students complete their professional education. Elective course third summer. Two quarter-hours.

504 Advanced Treatment of Children
This course is not currently offered
(Practice; Free)

This course will examine clinical practice issues with children, youth, and families in the context of school and community-based practice settings, based on "systems of care" principles. Both psychodynamic and narrative models will be addressed. Practice models which have a strong research base for effectiveness, such as Henggeler's Multisystemic Therapy and the Second Step Violence Prevention Curriculum will also be included. The course will include examination of both instructor's and students' cases, and help to prepare graduating seniors to provide services for both prevention and intervention with seriously troubled children and youth in public settings. Prerequisite 304 or equivalent documented experience. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

506 Brief Dynamic Psychotherapy
(Practice; Free)

This course will focus on theory and practice of brief dynamic psychotherapy (BDP) with adult individuals. It is based on psychodynamic and developmental theories of personality organization, as well as on theories about the impact of time and time limits on the process of therapy. Topics to be covered include the evolution of brief therapy, the work of major contributors to the field, and consideration of treatment issues such as selection criteria, use of a dynamic focus, and use of transference and confrontation. Other topics include short-term work with more disturbed clients, and cross-cultural issues in brief treatment. Prior course work and clinical experience in longer-term therapy, specifically knowledge about the differential use of self in the treatment relationship and skills in psychosocial assessment, provide the foundation from which we examine the technical shifts that occur when treatment is time-limited. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

514 Knowing, Not Knowing, and Muddling Through
(Practice; Free; 3rd Sum)

This course will focus on the complexity of clinical practice and becoming a clinical social worker. Knowing, not knowing, and muddling through will each be valued as essential and normative stages and experiences as we encounter the inevitable and confusing therapeutic impasses, intense emotions, and unconscious behaviors inherent to the understanding of others, ourselves, and the clinical relationship. The assumption will be held that clinical social workers experience both positive and negative reactions toward their clients, and these inevitable reactions must be consciously and curiously examined in order to facilitate ethical, compassionate, and empathic clinical care. Class members will be encouraged to value “not knowing” and the “beginner’s mind” as much as they value “knowing” and being an “expert.” An eclectic assortment of theoretical and clinical practices, including but not limited to contemplative, intersubjective, and psychoanalytic models, will influence the teaching of this course. However, class members will be encouraged to conceptualize clinical material within whatever theoretical framework seems most useful to them. Class time will include lecture, discussion, and clinical presentations. Elective course third summer. Two quarter hours.

520 Boundaries, Boundary Violations, and Management of Intense Affect
This course is not currently offered
(Practice; Free)

This course will discuss the psychotherapy relationship examining issues that arise around boundary maintenance, boundary violations, and a psychodynamic relational understanding and management of sexual and loving feelings in therapists and clients. The concept of boundaries will be examined from both intrapsychic and interpersonal perspectives. Commonly occurring boundary violations will be discussed including the damage done to clients and the treatment relationship. Sessions will focus on understanding 1) sexual feelings from psychodynamic, intrapsychic, and interpersonal perspectives; 2) the concept of boundaries including use and misuse in clinical practice; and 3) the ethical, psychological, and legal sequelae of professional misconduct. The theoretical framework for understanding sexual and loving feelings will draw upon psychodynamic, developmental and relational perspectives and focus on the use of these feelings to deepen and advance the therapeutic process. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

533-01 Senior Integrative Seminar: Dismantling Institutional Racism: The Challenge for Social Workers
(HBSE/Policy/Practice/Research; 3rd Sum/O/S)

This course will serve as a Senior Integrative Seminar and will combine aspects of policy, HBSE, practice and research. It is designed for those students who have a strong interest in combating institutional racism and a commitment to engagement in anti-racism efforts. Students will consider the various forms and types of institutional racism and its presence in not only obvious circumstances, but also those situations where it is least expected. Students will also develop clear definitions of racism and oppression, with attention to the interactions that perpetrate their presence in our communities. The profession’s commitment to social justice and the roles that social workers have in the eradication of racism will be explored. The course uses research, theory, and student’s personal and professional experiences to analyze the manifestations of institutional racism. These efforts can help prepare students to engage in anti-racism activities as clinical practitioners, policy practitioners, teachers, scholars, activists and citizens. Elective course in third summer only; also fulfills O or S elective requirement. Two quarter-hours.

533-01 Senior Integrative Seminar: Advanced Concepts in Comparative Psychodynamic Theory
(HBSE; Free, 3rd Summer)

This course reviews and builds upon concepts covered in the first and second year theory sequence, with a special emphasis on object relations, self psychology, and contemporary relational theories. The seminar will consist of close reading of select theoretical papers, and clinical application using student case examples. Using a comparative approach, we will return to many of the major thinkers in the psychoanalytic canon, reading them in conjunction with more contemporary theoretical papers which interact with and expand upon the earlier ideas. Students will have opportunity to present and revisit their clinical work in light of a range of theoretical perspectives. This senior seminar is geared toward students who want to learn to be more facile with psychodynamic concepts and with the application of theory to clinical work. It offers students an opportunity to think through their agency-based practice, and to explore important questions about the relevance of psychodynamic theories to a range of practice contexts and at-risk populations. Elective course in third summer only.

533-02 Senior Integrative Seminar: Advanced Concepts in Comparative Psychodynamic Theory
(HBSE; Free, 3rd Summer)

This course reviews and builds upon concepts covered in the first and second year theory sequence, with a special emphasis on object relations, self psychology, and contemporary relational theories. The seminar will consist of close reading of select theoretical papers, and clinical application using student case examples. Using a comparative approach, we will return to many of the major thinkers in the psychoanalytic canon, reading them in conjunction with more contemporary theoretical papers which interact with and expand upon the earlier ideas. Students will have opportunity to present and revisit their clinical work in light of a range of theoretical perspectives. This senior seminar is geared toward students who want to learn to be more facile with psychodynamic concepts and with the application of theory to clinical work. It offers students an opportunity to think through their agency-based practice, and to explore important questions about the relevance of psychodynamic theories to a range of practice contexts and at-risk populations. Elective course in third summer only.

534 Attachment and Mastery in Contemporary Ego Psychology
(HBSE; Free)

This course examines two of the most important human motivations, attachment and mastery (self-efficacy), as central aspects of human behavior. For clinicians these motives are particularly important because they are at the heart of the therapeutic relationship and often present the most difficult problems in both short and long-term therapies. The course will maintain a dual focus on theory and on clinical applications. Clinical examples from the assigned readings and the instructor's clinical practice will illustrate how attachment and mastery are manifested in diverse populations. In the current climate of managed care there will be a special emphasis on understanding these concepts as they manifest themselves in brief therapy (including the research on brief therapy of the San Francisco Psychotherapy Research Group). Student presentations will focus on re-examining clinical dilemmas that have occurred in their own clinical work in the light of these concepts. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

535 Cross Cultural Issues in Attachment
This course is not currently offered
(HBSE; Free)

This course considers how during the first year of life babies gain relational experience with their caregivers that becomes a frame that guides them further in their lives. This frame, named as attachment style, reflects the ability of the caregiver to become a secure base to the child from which she/he can explore the world. The attachment style can facilitate or hinder the development of the individual. Once formed it is resistant to change unless challenged. How to challenge it is one of the focuses of the course. To what extent and how cultures shape the early relationships between the parent and the infant is the second issue that will be considered during the course. Addressing this question will prepare students to understand the meaning that a cultural context adds to the earliest relationships. Both focuses of the course will help students create a secure therapeutic environment for exploring with the client her/his relational styles and expectations for security. Transference and counter transference will be discussed in relation to attachment needs that are often culturally shaped. The concept of mentalization will be presented and discussed. In addition, the course will present recent findings in neurobiology that have demonstrated how long-term separation and absence of attachment relationships in infancy can affect the development of the brain. Therapeutic interventions in this area will be discussed and developed in the context of de-institutionalization of children in Eastern Europe. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

536 Culture and Development Across the Life Course: An Anthropological Perspective
This course is not currently offered
(HBSE; A)

This course will use ethnographic data and concepts from anthropology to explore similarities and differences in development as it occurs across cultures. Emphasis will be on understanding the interaction between biological/maturational species-wide aspects of development and the cultural context: the way cultural values, ideals and practices shape, and give meaning to, development. The course will use a history of ideas approach to explore the continuing debate within anthropology between relativist, universalist and cultural pluralist approaches to understanding development across cultures, and the relevance of this debate to clinical social work practice. It will also help students think creatively about using psychodynamic models of development, which describe development in European and North American culture, in their practice with clients from non–western cultures. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

537 Violence: A Systemic Approach to Assessment and Intervention
This course is not currently offered
(HBSE; Free)

Each of us is touched by violence in some way. Our lives are influenced by violence through a variety of systems from family relationships to institutional and cultural structures. A culture's response to and understanding of the nature of its people's violence have lasting consequences. As social workers, we frequently engage with individuals and communities in crisis and are confronted with interpersonal and systemic brutality. We are often on the front line in responding to violence in our work with both the perpetrators and the victims of violent acts. Our study of human relationships in the context of working toward positive change on both the micro and macro level requires an understanding of the social construction of both antisocial and prosocial behaviors. Work with violent individuals and oppressive systems truly challenges our ability as social workers to identify with the other in our attempt to reach levels of empathy necessary to be effective agents of change. We will examine the nature of violence, cruelty and aggression in the service of violence prevention as well as intervention in response to violence. In order to understand more fully avenues for fostering non-violent communities, families and individuals, we will also explore the phenomena of kindness, the relationship between restorative understanding and accountability and the process of survival and healing. Attention will be paid to the influence of diversity factors such as race, ethnicity, religion, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, age, gender, and disability. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

540 Death and Bereavement Over the Life Cycle
(HBSE; Free; 3rd Sum)

This class will address issues of Death, Loss and Bereavement as they are experienced in today's society. We will explore some of the reasons for why this is often a hidden topic not only in the larger society but in particular in social work practice. Social Workers confront loss of some kind in almost all therapeutic situations, as the issue of loss is central to all life changes. With recent demographic changes in family structure, previous family and social networks no longer support, explain and contain the experience of death and bereavement. Clinicians are now placed in the position of being the healers of the grief experience. However, most clinicians report a high level of discomfort and lack of training in dealing with either their own losses or the losses of others. This course will focus on both the experiences of dying and bereavement as viewed by dying individuals, surviving family and friends. How we cope with grief shapes our lives, it illuminates our response to change, and can determine how we form, maintain and let go of relationships. A life cycle approach will be used with the focus on the most concrete of losses, death, and then integrating that as part of a continuum of loss, e.g. the loss of youth, divorce/end of previously committed relationships, an ideal, a dream, or even a former self. The challenges of confronting AIDS, violence, unseen losses such as pregnancy related losses and addiction will be explored. We will look at the process of loss and change as well as at the social institutions that provide services to the dying and bereaved. Social work interventions will be suggested. The material in this course is drawn from original case histories, at times using video recordings. Woven throughout the course will be examples from the world of the arts, literature, drama and poetry as well as from the professional literature. The student's own experience of repeated terminations during their MSW years at Smith will also be integrated into class themes, challenging each graduating senior, in the present, with the question: Is loss, when mourned, a vehicle for growth? Elective course third summer only. Two quarter-hours.

545 Feminist Psychodynamic Theory and Practice
This course is not currently offered
(HBSE/Practice; Free)

Psychoanalytic and feminist theories have commented extensively on the nature of gender difference and its influence on our cultural, political and psychic structures. This course will provide an historical framework for analyzing feminism's ongoing dialogue with psychodynamic theory and practice. This course provides opportunities to study classic and feminist discourses and central constructs of feminist and psychodynamic thinking. Topics include: classical and contemporary trauma theory; the Oedipus complex; the role of mothering; sexuality; and the role of language. Implications for clinical social work practice with culturally diverse populations are discussed. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

549 Clinical Applications of Intersubjective Theory
(Practice; Free; 3rd Sum)

In this class, students will bring in clinical work from their second year placements, particularly their major case studies, and reformulate the cases through the lens of intersubjective theory. Theories and their clinical implications developed by Stephen Mitchell, Jessica Benjamin, Jody Davies, Philip Bromberg and Lew Aron will provide the conceptual framework for the discussions. We will pay careful attention to social factors alive in the cases, as well as transference/countertransference dynamics. We will explore notions of intersubjectivity and mutual influence to think through students' work with their clients. Class discussion will include line by line examination of the process of interaction and make extensive use of role plays to hone clinical understanding. Elective course in third summer only. Two quarter-hours.

560 Comparative Perspectives on Disability and Disability Policy
(HBSE/Policy/Practice; O/S)

This course introduces students to social work with persons with disabilities and their families. We will consider the history, social construction, cultural perspectives, and demographics of physical, emotional, sensory, and cognitive disability. Major national disability policies and programs are studied and critiqued, along with individual and collective strategies that foster empowerment and social justice. Individual experiences of people with various types of disabilities and families are explored, followed by a discussion of issues of discrimination, equal access, universal design, and social integration. After gaining a sense of the personal experiences and social status of people with disabilities, implications for social work practice are addressed. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

561 Substance Abuse Policy and Services
(Policy; F/O/S)

In this course we examine substance use and abuse in the United States and policy approaches to managing it. The course will review the scope and correlates of substance abuse in the United States, examine current state and federal policies in place to address this issue, and discuss policy alternatives. Students will read about and debate the theories that explain the cause of substance abuse, and understand policy as a product of those theories. The impact of current policy on the judicial and criminal justice systems will also be discussed. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

562 Women and Policy in a Global Context
(Policy; F/O/S)

This course focuses on the impact of multiculturalism and globalization on women’s equality and empowerment from a postmodern perspective. Students will first be introduced to an analytical framework for an analysis of key social policy areas affecting women in the U.S. and around the world. The analytical framework will then be used to explore the intersectionality of economic security, access to education, protection from gender-based violence, (reproductive) health, and participation in civic leadership as well as peace building. The exploration will include the intersection between gender and other aspects of identity, such as race, ethnicity, culture, class, age, sexual orientation, disability, religion, and immigration status. Concrete policy interventions for addressing discriminatory laws, policies and practices are discussed for each policy area. Students will also consider the role of clinical social work in ensuring that remedial policy interventions are equitable, empowering women, and sustainable. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

581 Writing for Professional Publication
This course is not currently offered
(Research; 3rd Sum)

This course offers a framework for conceptualizing, organizing, writing, and submitting for publication a paper of professional quality that reflects an area of interest to social work. Using the thesis as a basis for work, it launches students as professionals capable of contributing to and advancing the knowledge base of the profession, both in the present and future. Elective course third summer only. Two quarter-hours.

582 Evidence Based Practice in Social Work
(Research; Free)

Most students who complete the foundation and specialization courses in research come away as beginning consumers and producers of research. However, most graduating MSW students will be employed in settings that require the ability to utilize the evidence based practice (EBP) process as an integral part of developing treatment plans and implementing interventions in collaboration with the client. Thus, it is the intent of this course to equip the student with sufficient knowledge and skills of the EBP process for use in a variety of settings with diverse populations. Students will be introduced to the history of EBM/EBP and its current status as a growing movement both nationally and globally. The seven (Drisko & Grady, 2012) steps of the EBP process is the major focus of the course. Students will move through the process step by step beginning with assessment and question formulation, moving on to locating the relevant research, evaluating the research and developing a treatment plan in the context of client needs and clinician expertise. Issues and challenges having to do with race and culture, oppressed populations, and implementation/evaluation will be included and interwoven throughout the course. The format of the course includes didactic presentations, problem-based learning, group activities, case examples and guest speakers. Elective second or third summer. Two quarter hours.

590 HIV/AIDS: Practice and Policy Perspectives
(Policy/Practice; O/S)

This course will provide students with an opportunity to understand the history of the epidemic in the U.S., how patterns of incidence and prevalence are changing, and how public policy has evolved. Up-to-date information on transmission, treatments, ethical issues, and prevention strategies will be provided. Personal and professional values, transference and countertransference issues, clinical situations, and the psychosocial issues confronting people infected with and affected by HIV will be explored. Students will develop a framework for thinking about the impact of HIV on society, and will examine the implications of all of the above for clinical practice. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

591 Clinical Practice in Low-Income Communities
This course is not currently offered
(Policy/Practice; O/S)

This course will examine successful models of clinical practice that have been developed in low-income communities from the 1960s to the present. We will critically consider the usefulness of a range of psychological and social theories and models of practice to the needs of a highly stressed population, as well as the settings in which relevant models of practice are expanding. We will look at the particular rewards and pressures experienced by clinicians working on the "front lines" of social neglect and dysfunction, and at spiritual practices and conditions which sustain us in our work. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

592 Issues in the Treatment of Mental Illness: Clinical and Social Policy Perspectives
(HBSE/Policy/Practice; O/S)

This course will address some of the major policy and service delivery issues in the field of mental health that affect the lives of individuals with chronic mental illness and their families. Particular attention will be given to individuals suffering from major mental illnesses, including Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorders, Major Depressive Disorder, and Psychological Trauma. Course readings and case material will also address issues in the treatment of adults dually diagnosed with major mental illnesses and Substance Related Disorders. Advocacy efforts from clients and their families will be discussed. Students' class presentations of their own clinical work with mentally ill adults will provide opportunities for discussing treatment questions and ethical dilemmas that arise in working with these individuals and their families. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

594 Private Troubles and Public Issues: The Social Construction of Assessment
This course is not currently offered
(HBSE/Practice; A)

This course will provide a framework for analyzing the historical, social, cultural, and political contexts of some psychiatric diagnoses and schema for assessing individual and family dysfunction. It is principally concerned with establishing the usefulness to clinical practitioners of social as well as psychological explanatory theories. In this course we will study three propositions: 1. That hierarchical and oppressive social arrangements (racism, classism, and sexism among others) and problematic social values (excessive individualism) have identifiable impact on contemporary patterns of individual and family distress; 2. That the construction of human problems as principally psychological promotes therapeutic and private interventions at the expense of a balance between social and psychological solutions; and 3. That knowledge about the social construction of assessment schema has a direct impact on the effectiveness of clinical practice. The social and cultural context of psychiatric diagnoses and the impact of managed care and service delivery systems will also be explored. Elective course third summer only. Two quarter-hours.

595 Advanced Clinical Practice with Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Clients
(Policy/Practice; 3rd/O)

While attitudes toward sexual and affectual orientation have changed dramatically, our culture--and the mental health field in particular--is only beginning to wrestle with the complexities of gender and the relationship between aspects of gender and sexual orientation. Fortunately social workers now have at their disposal a significant body of theoretically and clinically sound literature on LGBTQ persons along with affirmative treatment approaches to replace earlier discredited formulations that routinely pathologized persons whose sexual and gender identities fell outside of strictly enforced binaries. The focus of this clinical practice elective will be on exploring effective, Relationally oriented, psychodynamic treatment strategies with these client populations. Contemporary treatment perspectives will be addressed largely through analysis of case material at an advanced level. This is a high participation, case-centered course in which considerable time will be devoted to case presentations and small-group exercises of various types. Particular attention will be paid to enhancing students’ attunement to a broad range of environmental, ethnocultural, social-class and life-cycle issues specific to these individuals and their families and to how these phenomena intersect with the clinician's various social identities, including sexual orientation and gender. We will explore in depth the influence of homophobia and sexism on development, clinical phenomena and treatment relationships. Emphasis will be placed on case-specific analysis of the transference/countertransference matrix and ethical/boundary issues frequently encountered in the work, as well as in the supervisory process. Elective course third summer only. Two quarter-hours.

597 Theory and Clinical Practice with Addicted Clients: Dual Diagnosis
(HBSE/Practice; Free)

Using multiple theoretical frameworks, this course will focus on the assessment and treatment of people diagnosed with substance use disorders and mental illness. Students will learn how to complete thorough biopsychosocial assessments, with special attention given to the co-occurrence of addiction and mood disorders, psychological trauma, psychotic disorders, and ADD/ADHD. A range of therapeutic interventions will be introduced and applied through case analysis, these include: psychopharmacology, psychodynamic approaches, motivational enhancement treatment and the stages of change, individual, group, and family therapy modalities, relapse prevention, and the use of mutual support programs. Discourse will include choosing priorities in treatment, the challenges of providing integrated treatment, and systemic pitfalls faced by those working in the field and those trying to access services. Understanding that those who are dually diagnosed experience greater risk factors for being part of oppressed and vulnerable populations will be incorporated within the ongoing class discussions. Classroom methods will include lecture, small group interaction, videotapes and case presentations. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

599 Clinical Social Work and Social Action: Bridging the False Dichotomy
(HBSE/Practice; A/S)

This course is designed to help students explore the connections and contradictions that exist between social work ideology, values, knowledge, policies, goals and objectives, as they are enacted in professional social work practice. Students will be asked to reflect on their clinical actions to uncover the meanings and contradictions that exist in their work with clients. Uncovering these contradictions will help students identify the areas of personal and social change that require strategies to reorient their work with their clients. The level at which social and political action takes place will be determined in part by the level at which the contradictions are found, e.g., worker, agency, profession, social policy. Fundamental to the values of this course is that the contradictions at the clinical level must be examined, understood, and engaged before social and political action at other levels can be undertaken. Theories and strategies of social and political action to deal with various levels of contradictions will be examined. Finally, attention will be paid to contradictions and issues related to race, class, gender, sexual orientation, religion and disabilities. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

5534 Advanced Studies in Race and Racism: Trends and Challenges for Social Work Theory and Practice
(HBSE/Practice; 3rd Sum/O/A)

This course builds upon and deepens themes introduced in course number 334. Racism in the United States: Implications for Social Work Practice. It continues to examine and explore the nature and impact of oppression, prejudice, discrimination, powerlessness, the relationships between race and social class, gender, and sexual orientation. Special attention will be given to theories of racial identity formation for people who identify and/or are identified as white, of color, biracial, and bicultural, as well as to the examination of white privilege, interpersonal and institutional racism, and the workings of the white power structure. Theories and strategies for change in a clinical practice that is race-sensitive and empowering, as well as one that moves from individual to institutional and community change will be explored. Students will also examine issues of cross racial hostility and coalition building between people of color and white allies. Priority will be given to studying the theoretical, literary, and practice writings of people of color. Elective course third summer. Two quarter-hours.

5535 Gender Studies
(HBSE; A)

What do we learn about the dominant discourses around gender when listening to the voices of those marginalized by those assumptions? What contributions have feminist and postmodern perspectives given to our understanding of gender? How do our personal beliefs about gender inform our clinical approaches to identity, coupling, sexuality, parenting, and alternative family forms? Utilizing an overview of current writings, this seminar will address clinical practice and public policy issues from a range of psychological, biological, cultural, and social theories about gender. Case vignettes, film, and literature will provide illustrations for in-class discussion. An experiential component will allow reflection on “gender standpoint” that we all acquire through our particular cultural and personal histories. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.

5536 Psychosocial Capacity Building in Response to Disasters
(Policy/Practice; A/M)

There is a social ecology for every disaster: a matrix of socio-historical factors interacting with geological, social, cultural and political conditions. Some disasters stem from “natural causes,” (e.g., hurricanes and earthquakes) while others are initiated by human beings, (e.g., chemical spills, bombings, shootings, armed conflict). This course will consider the social ecology of a range of disasters and ways that clinical social workers can respond. There will be an integration of disaster mental health approaches with psychosocial capacity building. The course will also focus on disaster service delivery systems, crisis intervention skills, policy issues surrounding disaster response and research on effectiveness of interventions. By the end of this course students should be able to offer basic crisis intervention services to survivors of disasters and have the beginning capacity to work with others to plan and evaluate disaster response programs. Elective course second or third summer. Two quarter-hours.