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Summer Seminar Series

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Weekend C:

Thursday, July 17, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

14-311c: The Troubled Triangle: The Developmental Neurobiology of Addiction, Attachment, and Trauma

Kurt White, M.S.W.

Addiction work is trauma work. Recent studies show that as much as 80% of co-occurring clients have histories of trauma (often multiple episodes of trauma). Rates of PTSD and other trauma-related disorders are endemic to addicted populations. Clinicians who see themselves as addiction specialists often feel uncomfortable with the trauma related presentations in substance use disorders; conversely, many skilled trauma therapists have had little training in addiction. This seminar aims to help both groups build the gap in both knowledge and the skills for working with this complex population using new knowledge on the neurobiology of attachment. We will examine the disruptions to healthy attachment patterns and how this predisposes individuals to develop addiction in mid-late teen years. Early experiences alter gene expression and brain development: exposure to an environment of disrupted attachment, persistent fear, trauma-related experiences, and exposure to substances all have significant affects on the developing brain. This new science of attachment and neurobiology can be a guide to effective treatment interventions with addicted individuals. Both theory and implications for technique will be explored.

Learning Objectives and References coming soon.

Faculty: Kurt White, M.S.W. is a clinical social worker and substance abuse counselor who works as the manager of the Birches and Starting Now Programs at the Brattleboro Retreat. He is an adjunct faculty member at Smith College School for Social Work and at Antioch University New England’s Dept. of Applied Psychology.

 

14-312c: Orientation to the Field (for Smith Field Affiliates)

Carolyn S. du Bois, M.S.W., L.I.C.S.W. &
Katelin Lewis-Kulin, M.S.W., L.C.S.W.

(Limited to Smith Field Affiliates only)
This course will provide an orientation to the Smith College School for Social Work and address the general principals of supervision with a particular focus on the development of the supervisory relationship. The course will concentrate on assessment of supervisory/student teaching/learning styles, principles of adult learning, stages of clinical learning, boundaries within the supervisory relationship, the use of educational learning tools including process recordings/role play and the role of evaluation. The central issues of diversity in the supervisory process and meeting the needs of the agency, supervisor and students will also become major areas of attention. The format will include mini lecture, video material, case vignette(s) and group discussion. Participants are encouraged to bring examples and dilemmas from their own experience. (This course is ONLY open to those supervising for Smith College School for Social Work students).

Learning Objectives and References coming soon.

Faculty: Carolyn S. du Bois, M.S.W., L.I.C.S.W. - Director of Field Work and Clinical Associate Professor, Smith College School for Social Work. Carolyn received her MSW degree from Smith College in 1976 and has over 35 years of experience as a clinician in child guidance, college mental health and private practice settings. She has taught clinical practice at Smith for 28 years and has served as the Director of Field Work for the past 16 years.

Faculty: Katelin Lewis-Kulin, M.S.W., L.C.S.W. (CA)- Associate Director of Field Work, Smith College School for Social Work. Katelin received her MSW degree from Smith College in 2000 and recently joined the Field Dept after 15 years experience as a clinician in hospital, community mental health, and private practice settings. She has supervised numerous clinical staff and Smith students and served as the Director of Training at a Smith affiliated hospital.

 

14-313c: Time-In, Not Time-Out: Strategies for Co-Regulation with Traumatized Adolescents and Families

Martha B. Straus, Ph.D.

Traumatized adolescents struggle with self-regulation. They are dysregulated across systems--neurologically, cognitively, physically, emotionally, behaviorally, socially, and spiritually. Anxious and vigilant, and unable to trust themselves or caregivers, they may experience even loving relationships as confusing and frightening. But to learn self-soothing, they must first be able to rely upon others, and discover the joy of co-regulation. They benefit from relationships with adults that provide them with the psychological (and physical) sense of containment they cannot supply themselves. In this workshop, we will discuss and practice mindful, empathic strategies to help these teens—and their parents--feel more secure, connected, present, and stable.

Learning Objectives and References coming soon.

Faculty: Martha B. Straus, Ph.D. is a professor in the Department of Clinical Psychology at Antioch University New England Graduate School in Keene, New Hampshire, and adjunct instructor in psychiatry at Dartmouth Medical School. She maintains a small private practice in Brattleboro, VT and consults to schools, social service agencies and courts. Dr. Straus is the author of numerous articles and four books including No-Talk Therapy for Children and Adolescents, and more recently, Adolescent Girls in Crisis: Intervention and Hope. Dr. Straus trains and conducts workshops internationally.

 

14-314c: Ethical dilemmas in caring for the geriatric population with mental health issues

Mary Barbato, R.N.-PC.

In this course we will review what constitutes mental illness in the elderly and how you can support geriatric clients and their families. We will discuss a range of diagnoses that may be applicable when working with the elderly. Special attention will be given to the terminology used to understand dementia and approaches for assessing whether a client is experiencing natural aging or showing signs of depression. We will also review the use of the DSM-V criteria to diagnose mental illness. In addition, this course will address ways you, as a social work provider, can help your client and client’s family. An overview of the legal issues the geriatric population faces will be presented. Advance directives, including the health care proxy, power of attorney, legal guardianship, and Molst forms will be discussed in detail. We will also discuss tools for evaluating the client’s family and support systems, as well as how to identify the support systems in the community available for your clients.  Finally, we will examine family systems, and how to “meet your client and family where they are at,” while still knowing when and how to intervene.

Learning Objectives and References coming soon.

Faculty: Mary Barbato, R.N.-PC.

Faculty Bio Coming Soon!

 

Friday, July 18, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

14-321c: Assessing the Risk: Interviewing, Understanding and Managing Suicidal and Self Injurious Clients

Kirk Woodring, M.S.W., L.I.C.S.W., C.G.P.

Although suicide rates over the past decade have gradually declined, suicide attempts, and parasuicidal behavior, continue to increase in frequency across the country. Assessing for risk requires not only understanding the intensity of ideation, the plan, and the means, but also knowledge of cultural, racial and socio-economic pressures that may potentiate risk. This workshop will provide an analysis of the clinical and social factors influencing risk, as well as tools to use for interviewing and intervening with high risk individuals.

Learning Objectives and References coming soon.

Faculty: Kirk Woodring, M.S.W., L.I.C.S.W., C.G.P. is the Senior Director of Access, Evaluation, Ambulatory and Security Services at the Brattleboro Retreat in Brattleboro, Vermont and is the author of “Assessing the Risk: Suicidal Behavior in the Hospital Environment of Care” (HCPro, 2011). Mr. Woodring is an Adjunct Associate Professor of Social Work at Smith College, where he teaches courses in group theory, group therapy and crisis intervention. His experience in risk assessment includes supervision of psychiatric crisis services in Massachusetts, and consultation for numerous state and national organizations providing following natural and human caused disasters.

 

14-322c: Infant-parent psychotherapy: Providing mental health services for parents and their children, ages birth to three.

Caroline Phillips, M. Phil., D. Clin. Psy

The first three years of life are a period of unparalleled growth in all areas of a baby’s development. A child’s earliest experiences, in particular their interactions with caregivers, influence not only their physical health, but also their social and emotional development. The quality of care they receive profoundly shapes who they will become and has the capacity to create a foundation for trust, lifelong learning, and competence. This course considers the developing relationships of infants within the family context. It discusses the factors that promote healthy emotional development and the ways in which that development can be challenged. We will discuss how providers can develop a therapeutic approach to working with parents and their infants and the role of infant-parent psychotherapy in early intervention and treatment. Theories of psychoanalysis and attachment will provide a lens through which to view and understand the ways in which the earliest experiences, including trauma, impact later development. We will discuss a range of specific clinical issues, such as regulatory disorders of infancy (sleeping, feeding, and crying); parent mental health; effects of trauma and maltreatment; and children with special needs Case material and group discussions will address conceptual and practical aspects of doing relationship-based, dyadic psychotherapy with infants and parents.

Learning Objectives and References coming soon.

Faculty: Dr. Caroline Phillips, M. Phil., D. Clin. Psy. is a clinical psychologist from the UK. Her clinical work has focused on children with neurodevelopmental disabilities and psychotherapy for parents and young children. She has completed a three-year course of study in Parent-Infant Psychotherapy at the Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research at Columbia University and recently finished a two-year post-doctoral research fellowship at the Seaver Autism Center at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. She has provided training for medical residents and other health professionals both in the US and the UK. Her professional and practice interests include parent and infant mental health, autism, and early interventions.

 

14-323c: All the Rage: Helping Adolescent Girls in Crisis

Martha B. Straus, Ph.D.

Many adolescent girls today are in a crisis of rage and despair. Some try to disappear through starvation, others carve indecipherable symbols onto their arms or run away from home, still others bully and get bullied, hide weeping in their rooms, or attempt suicide. How can therapists become more effective with this volatile population? This highly practical seminar will explore concrete strategies and methods for helping girls in crisis and examine the limitations of old standards of care such as self-harm contracts and confidentiality rules. You’ll learn what questions to ask and how to rally support for the girls from family and relationship network. You’ll also find out about a variety of practical strategies that work, including harm reduction, inviting resistance, and developing a protective circle of adults. By the time you leave, you’ll know what it takes to stay connected to these adolescents as you help them become competent and independent young women.

Learning Objectives and References coming soon.

Faculty: Martha B. Straus, Ph.D. is a professor in the Department of Clinical Psychology at Antioch University New England Graduate School in Keene, New Hampshire, and adjunct instructor in psychiatry at Dartmouth Medical School. She maintains a small private practice in Brattleboro, VT and consults to schools, social service agencies and courts. Dr. Straus is the author of numerous articles and four books including No-Talk Therapy for Children and Adolescents, and more recently, Adolescent Girls in Crisis: Intervention and Hope. Dr. Straus trains and conducts workshops internationally.

 

14-324c: Attachment Across the Life Span:
Clinical Implications

Sally D. Popper, Ph.D.

Attachment has become perhaps the dominant paradigm for understanding development clinically, but few understand it in enough depth to be able to make use of the clinical richness it offers. This presentation will provide a brief historical background on the origins of attachment theory in John Bowlby’s work, Mary Ainsworth’s seminal contributions in operationalizing a measurement of attachment in the parent-infant relationship, and Mary Main’s extension of our understanding to comprehend the operation of the attachment system in adults, as well as the importance of disorganization in attachment for later development. We will discuss work on intergenerational Attachment has become perhaps the dominant paradigm for understanding development clinically, but few understand it in enough depth to be able to make use of the clinical richness it offers. This presentation will provide a brief historical background on the origins of attachment theory in John Bowlby’s work, Mary Ainsworth’s seminal contributions in operationalizing a measurement of attachment in the parent-infant relationship, and Mary Main’s extension of our understanding to comprehend the operation of the attachment system in adults, as well as the importance of disorganization in attachment for later development. We will discuss work on intergenerational transmission of attachment, the relationship of disorganized attachment to dissociation, and the impact of interpersonal trauma on the attachment system. We will see examples of Ainsworth’s “Strange Situation” to assess early childhood attachment styles, and will read from examples of Mary Main’s Adult Attachment Interview to understand the methods it uses to assess attachment styles. The second half of the day will focus on clinical implications of attachment, with a focus on several approaches that have thoughtfully incorporated an understanding of attachment to enrich clinical focus. These will include work by David Wallin, Kristine Kinniburgh and Margaret Blaustein, Dan Hughes, Alicia Lieberman and Patricia Van Horn, and Mary Dozier. While the majority of the clinical approaches discussed will be child-focused, there will also be a focus on ways in which early attachment experiences affect adult clinical presentations.

Learning Objectives and References coming soon.

Faculty: Sally D. Popper, Ph.D. has worked as a researcher and clinician exploring the impact of attachment disruption and early trauma on the development of young children and working with their families to help them heal. As a board member of the national parent/professional organization. ATTACh, she worked to bring information from new research to the clinical practice and parenting of members. This work culminated in co-authorship of a book now in press entitled Attachment-Focused Therapy: A Professional Practice Guide. She is also author and co-author of a number of journal articles, and has presented locally and nationally on topics ranging from postpartum depression to the impact of early trauma and loss on the developing brain. She currently serves on the board of the Treehouse Foundation and is an active volunteer both at the Treehouse community and in the Treehouse inspired Reenvisioning Foster Care in America task force.

 

 

Saturday, July 19, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

14-331c: The Trauma Whisperers: What Works in Contemporary Trauma Treatment

Daniel Buccino, L.C.S.W.-C.

With the heavy psychological toll on overextended Iraq and Afghanistan veterans, clinical social workers and psychotherapists are being faced with a great demand to care for traumatized patients. While the clinical community certainly needs to ramp up its capacity to respond to the surge of veterans and their family members, there is also a need to step back and reflect soberly on the evidence about what works across different models of trauma treatment in order to provide the most effective services in the most efficient manner. This highly acclaimed and clinically relevant workshop is meant to demystify some of the competing discourses about trauma treatment and support therapists in all practice settings to be better equipped to respond to this clinical imperative.

In attending to the needs of our returning warriors, however, we must not forget the need to continue to provide trauma-informed therapy to a wide range of other clinical populations. This workshop will examine differential issues of trauma in those exposed to war, urban violence and incarceration, domestic violence, physical and sexual child abuse and neglect, terrorism, and natural disasters. In reviewing issues of PTSD, DID, medication management, psychic numbing and hypervigilance, vicarious traumatization, competing models of therapy, and resilience, we will identify the latest gentle, but steadfast and effective, strategies for working with those suffering from psychological wounds.

Learning Objectives and References coming soon.

Faculty: Daniel L. Buccino, L.C.S.W.-C., B.C.D. is the Founder and Director of the Baltimore Psychotherapy Institute and Clinical Supervisor and Student Coordinator in the Community Psychiatry Program at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore. David serves on the clinical faculties at the University of Maryland School of Social Work, the Smith College School for Social Work, and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

 

14-332c: Narrative Therapy and Children/Adolescents and their Families

Beth Prullage, L.I.C.S.W.

This course will focus on a range of ways to apply Narrative Therapy concepts and tools with children and adolescents in a range of modalities and settings. It will begin with a brief didactic overview of Narrative therapy, but a range of small group activities, clinical examples, demonstration interviews, etc. will be utilized throughout the day. It is hoped that participants will leave the workshop with a range of new tools and activities to incorporate into their work with young people and their families.

Learning Objectives and References coming soon.

Faculty: Beth Prullage, M.S.W., L.I.C.S.W. is a therapist, educator and consultant on Narrative Therapy. She is on the adjunct faculty at Smith College School for Social Work and Simmons College School for Social Work, where she teaches courses in individual and family practice, family therapy, group therapy and Narrative Therapy. She additionally consults with non-profit organizations on ways to engage in collaborative and strengths-based clinical practice.

 

14-333c: Clinical Skills Working with Gender Nonconforming Children and Transgender Youth

Arlen Istar Lev, L.C.S.W.-R., C.A.S.A.C.

This workshop is an overview of gender identity development in children and youth, focusing on assessment of gender nonconformity in children, and transgender and transsexual identity in adolescence. We will example the available treatment options for pre-pubescent and adolescent children, including the use of hormone blockers and cross-sex hormones. Gender diversity and expression is viewed as a normative process of identity development, albeit a challenging one within rigid socio-cultural environment. The focus is systemic in examining the role of family members, service providers, and educational institutions. Attention will be paid to the newly released Standards of Care developed by the World Professional Association for Transgender Health will be reviewed.

Learning Objectives and References coming soon.

Faculty: Arlene (Ari) Istar Lev, L.C.S.W.-R., C.A.S.A.C., is a social worker, family therapist, educator, and writer whose work addresses the unique therapeutic needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people. She is the Founder and Clinical Director of Choices Counseling and Consulting and The Institute for Gender, Relationships, Identity, and Sexuality (TIGRIS), a training program in Albany, New York. Arlene has been a part-time lecturer at the State University New York at Albany, School of Social Welfare for the past 23 years, and is also an adjunct at Empire College and Smith School of Social Work. Additionally, she is the Clinical Supervisor for Center Support: Counseling Services, a low-cost therapy program at the Pride Center of the Capital District. Arlene has authored numerous journal articles and essays including authoring two books: The Complete Lesbian and Gay Parenting Guide and Transgender Emergence: Therapeutic Guidelines for Working with Gender-Variant People and their Families, winner of the American Psychological Association (Division 44) Distinguished Book Award, 2006.

 

14-334c: DSM-5: What Does It Mean for Contemporary Clinical Social Work Practice and Supervision?

David Byers, M.S.W., L.I.C.S.W.

Since publication of the first edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) by the American Psychiatric Association in 1952, many clinical social workers have held it at arm’s length. This course provides a careful review of some of the major changes introduced with the fifth edition in May 2013, and situates these changes and controversies in the context of the history of DSM and contemporary clinical social work practice. The changes over time have had and will continue to have significant implications for how we use the DSM and think about diagnosis and case formulation, as well as how we teach our students and supervisees to engage with it. Topics to be discussed include models for supervision in the context of DSM-5, balancing descriptive and etiological nosology, and ongoing critical engagement concerning ethical reasoning, sociocultural biases in diagnosis, and the shifting theoretical basis for the DSM. Course participants are asked to bring a brief case example presenting a challenge in diagnosis to share and discuss with the group. This course is appropriate for clinicians and clinical supervisors at all levels.

Learning Objectives and References coming soon.

Faculty: David Byers, M.S.W., L.I.C.S.W. is a Ph.D. Candidate at Smith College School for Social Work, and a lecturer and research advisor in the MSW program. He is presently teaching courses on psychosocial development, assessment, and neurobiology. David is also the Coordinator of Clinical Training and Development at Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston, and continues to serve as a clinical supervisor and clinician. David is presently conducting research in the Palestinian West Bank about cultural and political factors in clinical case conceptualization. He is also writing and presenting at schools and agencies about the implications of DSM-5 for social work theory and practice. For his dissertation, David is examining the moral reasoning of adolescent bystanders when witnessing bullying.

 

14-335c: Listening with Purpose: New Applications in Treating Shame and Narcissism

Patricia Gianotti, Psy.D.

Effective treatment of the spectrum of narcissistic injury must include an integrated understanding of narcissistically based thoughts and behaviors, ranging from expansive self-enhancement to crushing self criticism, from devaluation of others to over-idealization and hero-worship, from standards of perfectionism to an often defiant or flagrant disregard of rules and laws. This workshop will address how these often contradictory facets of distorted self-presentation form a tightly constructed defensive organization to keep feelings of shame and inadequacy at bay.

Through lecture, cogent video-taped case demonstrations, small group discussion, and shared case material we will examine how therapeutic listening and intervention techniques can be effectively used to penetrate narcissistic defenses of vertical splitting, grandiose expansiveness, cognitive distortions, self-destructive behaviors, and revenge enactments.

Participants will be introduced to an integrated Four Quadrant Model that explains how often contradictory parts of the psyche create a complex homeostatic balance. In order to see how these parts connect to the whole, participants will learn how to attend to what is being said as well as listening for what is being kept hidden from view and thus disconnected from the potential of emerging authenticity. Special techniques such moment-to-moment tracking, part-whole analysis, and the use of language as entry-points will help clinicians deepen their listening and intervention skills as the treatment unfolds.

Learning Objectives and References coming soon.

Faculty: Patricia Gianotti, Psy.D., is a licensed psychologist, clinical supervisor, and founding member of Woodland Professional Associates, a group private practice in North Hampton, NH. Dr. Gianotti, a seasoned lecturer and facilitator, has taught at Washington University and the University of New Hampshire and has presented at various professional conferences, including Division 39 and SEPI. She has recently co-authored a book with Jack Danielian entitled Listening with Purpose: Entry Points into Shame and Narcissistic Vulnerability.