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Summer Seminar Series

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Weekend C:

Thursday, July 16, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

15-311c: Orientation to the Field (For Smith Field Affiliates)

Carolyn S. du Bois, M.S.W., L.I.C.S.W.
Katelin Lewis-Kulin, M.S.W., L.C.S.W.

(Limited to Smith Field Affiliates only)
This course will provide an orientation to the Smith College School for Social Work and address the general principals of supervision with a particular focus on the development of the supervisory relationship. The course will concentrate on assessment of supervisory/student teaching/learning styles, principles of adult learning, stages of clinical learning, boundaries within the supervisory relationship, the use of educational learning tools including process recordings/role play and the role of evaluation. The central issues of diversity in the supervisory process and meeting the needs of the agency, supervisor and students will also become major areas of attention. The format will include mini lecture, video material, case vignette(s) and group discussion. Participants are encouraged to bring examples and dilemmas from their own experience. (This course is ONLY open to those supervising for Smith College School for Social Work students

Learning Objectives coming soon!

Faculty: Carolyn S. du Bois, M.S.W., L.I.C.S.W. - Director of Field Work and Clinical Associate Professor, Smith College School for Social Work. Carolyn received her MSW degree from Smith College in 1976 and has over 35 years of experience as a clinician in child guidance, college mental health and private practice settings. She has taught clinical practice at Smith for 28 years and has served as the Director of Field Work for the past 16 years

Faculty: Katelin Lewis-Kulin M.S.W., L.C.S.W. - Associate Director of Field Work, Smith College School for Social Work. Katelin received her MSW degree from Smith College in 2000 and recently joined the Field Dept. after 15 year’s experience as a clinician in hospital, community mental health, and private practice settings.  She has supervised numerous clinical staff and Smith students and served as the Director of Training at a Smith affiliated hospital.

 

15-312c: Birthing Healthier Families: Mood and Anxiety Disorders During Pregnancy and Postpartum

Mara Acel-Green, MSW, L.I.C.S.W.

Often a period that is described as bliss by outsiders, the period during pregnancy and postpartum are frequently described as a blur for those going through it. This workshop will explore perinatal mood and anxiety disorders: emotional complications of pregnancy and the postpartum period. Emotional complications are the most common complication of pregnancy and often go unreported. In this workshop we will explore the prevalence of these complications, the challenges to accessing appropriate care, and treatment approaches, primarily CBT, to perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. The workshop format includes case presentations, resource identification, and screening tools.

Learning Objectives coming soon!

Faculty: Mara Acel-Green, L.I.C.S.W., M.S.W. has a private practice in Belmont, MA where she sees pregnant and postpartum women and their families. Mara is the past President of the Board of Directors of Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition of MA and facilitates a clinical group for perinatal social workers in Boston. In addition to her private practice, Mara offers workshops and supervision in the area of perinatal mental health. Mara trained at Smith School for Social work and obtained a certificate in CBT through Boston University. Mara's written work can be seen on the Huffington Post.

 

15-313c: What Do We Mean By “Use of Self”?: Comparative Psychodynamic Perspectives on the Clinical Utility of Therapists’ Self Experience

Stacey Novack, Psy.D.

This seminar will explore the question of how a therapist “uses one’s self” in psychotherapy from three contemporary psychodynamic perspectives: 1) contemporary Kleinian theories of projective identification, 2) self-psychological conceptions of empathy, and 3) relational ideas about the role of the subjectivity of the therapist. Participants will read key papers representing each theoretical perspective and using their own clinical examples, will explore, through in-class discussion of case material, the clinical implications of each of these perspectives.

Learning Objectives coming soon!

Faculty: Stacey Novack, Psy.D. is a Clinical Psychologist in practice in Northampton, MA. She is adjunct faculty at the Smith College School for Social Work, where she teaches a course on comparative psychodynamic theories. Dr. Novack is also a psychoanalytic candidate at the Massachusetts Institute of Psychoanalysis (MIP).

 

15-314c: Out Of Control Kids: Intervening With Temper Tantrums, Meltdowns & Rage Attacks.

Garry L. Earles, M.S.W., L.I.C.S.W.


Extreme displays of emotion are frightening enough for those caught up in such impulsive episodes, let alone for those in close proximity subjected to them. While it is one thing to try to control the disruptive behavior of children and adolescents, it is quite another to contend with severe emotional episodes that “come out of nowhere.” Questions such as "What the heck is your problem? and What was that all about? abound. Reactions like "Go to your room and calm down" or "You better start behaving" indicate the frustrations in trying to "manage" these situations. Unexpected, unpredictable, illogical and unreasonable outbursts leave us dazed, confused, frightened and wondering not only about what's going on but about what to do. As an "insider," your presenter has had to contend with these sorts of episodes since early childhood. In sharing his experiences, participants acquire empathy. Through the use of metaphor, analogy and allegory, insight is gained into what really goes on “behind the scenes” regarding emotional and behavioral dysregulation. Accordingly, participants will be exposed to new paradigms regarding impulsive actions and their ramifications. Sometimes funny, sometimes irreverent, Garry’s sense of humor will provide you the much needed comic relief while discussing this most serious topic.

Learning Objectives coming soon!

Faculty: Garry L. Earles, M.S.W., L.I.C.S.W. Garry L. Earles is a Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker, Black Belt Martial Artist and 19th C. American Historian, Garry earned his M.S.W. from the University of Connecticut SSW and his M.A. in History from Fitchburg State University. Challenged by his own co-morbid neuro-biological conditions, he specializes in child and adolescent mental health. As a seasoned and highly-rated national trainer, speaker and consultant, he brings a unique "inside-out" perspective and delightful sense of humor to his seminars.

 

Friday, July 17, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

15-321c:Attachment Across the Life Span: Clinical Implications

Sally D. Popper, Ph.D.


Attachment has become perhaps the dominant paradigm for understanding development clinically, but few understand it in enough depth to be able to make use of the clinical richness it offers. This presentation will provide a brief historical background on the origins of attachment theory in John Bowlby’s work, Mary Ainsworth’s seminal contributions in operationalizing a measurement of attachment in the parent-infant relationship, and Mary Main’s extension of our understanding to comprehend the operation of the attachment system in adults, as well as the importance of disorganization in attachment for later development. We will discuss work on intergenerational Attachment has become perhaps the dominant paradigm for understanding development clinically, but few understand it in enough depth to be able to make use of the clinical richness it offers. This presentation will provide a brief historical background on the origins of attachment theory in John Bowlby’s work, Mary Ainsworth’s seminal contributions in operationalizing a measurement of attachment in the parent-infant relationship, and Mary Main’s extension of our understanding to comprehend the operation of the attachment system in adults, as well as the importance of disorganization in attachment for later development. We will discuss work on intergenerational transmission of attachment, the relationship of disorganized attachment to dissociation, and the impact of interpersonal trauma on the attachment system. We will see examples of Ainsworth’s “Strange Situation” to assess early childhood attachment styles, and will read from examples of Mary Main’s Adult Attachment Interview to understand the methods it uses to assess attachment styles.
The second half of the day will focus on clinical implications of attachment, with a focus on several approaches that have thoughtfully incorporated an understanding of attachment to enrich clinical focus. These will include work by David Wallin, Kristine Kinniburgh and Margaret Blaustein, Dan Hughes, Alicia Lieberman and Patricia Van Horn, and Mary Dozier. While the majority of the clinical approaches discussed will be child-focused, there will also be a focus on ways in which early attachment experiences affect adult clinical presentations.

Learning Objectives coming soon!

Faculty: Sally D. Popper, Ph.D. has worked as a researcher and clinician exploring the impact of attachment disruption and early trauma on the development of young children and working with their families to help them heal. As a board member of the national parent/professional organization. ATTACh, she worked to bring information from new research to the clinical practice and parenting of members. This work culminated in co-authorship of a book now in press entitled Attachment-Focused Therapy: A Professional Practice Guide. She is also author and co-author of a number of journal articles, and has presented locally and nationally on topics ranging from postpartum depression to the impact of early trauma and loss on the developing brain. She currently serves on the board of the Treehouse Foundation and is an active volunteer both at the Treehouse community and in the Treehouse inspired Reenvisioning Foster Care in America task force.

 

15-322c: Ethical Issues in the Use of Technology, Facebook and Other Social Media in Treatment

Catherine Clancy, Ph.D., L.C.S.W.


If you received your education and training over 25 years ago, you may be having trouble embracing the fact that the professional tools of the 21st century now include such things as working with social networking, video counseling, email, and cybertherapy, and this is not an exhaustive list by any means. While these tools have revolutionized service provision, they come with their own set of ethical and risk management issues, and the laws governing practice in these areas are far behind the advent of the new technological approaches to practice.

Learning Objectives coming soon!

Faculty: Catherine Clancy, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. - Social Work Training Director, Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, Houston, TX. Private clinical, educational, and consulting practice. Clinical Instructor, Dept. of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine; Past Chair, Texas State Board of Social Worker Examiners; Field Instructor, Smith College School for Social Work.

 

15-323c: The Trauma Whisperers: What Works in Contemporary Trauma Treatment

Daniel Buccino, L.C.S.W.-C., B.C.D.

 

With the heavy psychological toll on overextended Iraq and Afghanistan veterans, clinical social workers and psychotherapists are being faced with a great demand to care for traumatized patients. While the clinical community certainly needs to ramp up its capacity to respond to the surge of veterans and their family members, there is also a need to step back and reflect soberly on the evidence about what works across different models of trauma treatment in order to provide the most effective services in the most efficient manner. This highly acclaimed and clinically relevant workshop is meant to demystify some of the competing discourses about trauma treatment and support therapists in all practice settings to be better equipped to respond to this clinical imperative.

In attending to the needs of our returning warriors, however, we must not forget the need to continue to provide trauma-informed therapy to a wide range of other clinical populations. This workshop will examine differential issues of trauma in those exposed to war, urban violence and incarceration, domestic violence, physical and sexual child abuse and neglect, terrorism, and natural disasters. In reviewing issues of PTSD, DID, medication management, psychic numbing and hypervigilance, vicarious traumatization, competing models of therapy, and resilience, we will identify the latest gentle, but steadfast and effective, strategies for working with those suffering from psychological wounds.

Learning Objectives coming soon!

Faculty: Daniel L. Buccino, L.C.S.W.-C., B.C.D. is the Founder and Director of the Baltimore Psychotherapy Institute and Clinical Supervisor and Student Coordinator in the Community Psychiatry Program at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore. David serves on the clinical faculties at the University of Maryland School of Social Work, the Smith College School for Social Work, and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

 

15-324c: Emerging Drug Use Trends and Emerging Treatments for Addictive Disorders

Kurt White, M.S.W., L.I.C.S.W., L.A.D.C., C.G.P.

It’s rough out there! Drug overdose deaths seem to be everywhere in the news, from people in small town Vermont communities to accomplished movie stars. To complicate matters, the landscape of drug use is changing: prescription drug abuse, referring to the use of prescription opioids such as Oxycontin, Percoset, etc. is being called an epidemic, and its epicenter is Northern New England. More recently, illicit opioids have given way to a resurgence in heroin, including in unexpected places and populations, fueled in part by incredibly potent supply and efficient supply chains. New designer drugs, such as the so-called “bath salts” have also emerged along with designer drugs such as synthetic cannabinoids. More familiar drugs, like cannabis, have become drastically more potent, and more young people are engaging in use, with often dangerous consequences. In this workshop, we will explore these and other troubling trends, along with effective approaches for addressing substance use disorders. Effective but often misunderstood pharmacological treatments such as Suboxone and methadone will be explored at length. Along the way, we will discuss the nature of addictive illness, new categories in DSM-5, and the new 3rd edition of the ASAM Placement Criteria.

Learning Objectives coming soon!

Faculty: Kurt White, L.I.C.S.W., L.A.D.C., C.G.P. is the Director of Ambulatory Services at the Brattleboro Retreat in Brattleboro, VT, and is a social worker and drug and alcohol counselor by trade and training. He presently currently serves as president of the Vermont Association of Addiction Treatment Professionals (VAATP), which represents addiction treatment agencies in Vermont. Kurt is adjunct assistant professor at Smith College School for Social Work, where he teaches Group Theory and Practice. He is also adjunct faculty at Antioch New England Graduate School, where teaches in the Applied Psychology program.

 

 

Saturday, July 18, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

15-331c: Beginner's Guide to Sex Therapy

Amy Basford Pequet, M.S.W., L.I.C.S.W., CGP

It is common for clients to be struggling with issues related to sex and sexuality and less common for these struggles to be named and subsequently made the focus of therapeutic work. Sex therapy provides a frame for specifically addressing issues related to sex, sexuality, sexual functioning, and their impact on self and self-in-relationships. Sex therapy, like most other forms of psychotherapy, is exclusively talk therapy. However, unlike many other forms of psychotherapy, is facilitated by a therapist who is extensively trained in human sexuality and sexual functioning. Sex therapists are trained to diagnose the psychological origins of sexual issues and work to find solutions.

This course is designed to provide a beginning understanding of what sex therapy is, what it is not, and who accesses sex therapy. An overview of therapeutic models used in sex therapy will be presented as well as what kinds of sexual functioning issues often present in sex therapy. Participants will learn how to take a detailed sexual history that spans several sessions. Rich clinical material will be used to learn and practice the PLISSIT model for identifying what kind of sex therapy work to do with an individual or couple. Clinical vignettes will also be used to learn and identify sexual styles and how they impact a couple's ability to relate sexually and intimately to each other.

Learning Objectives coming soon!

Faculty: Amy Basford-Pequet, M.S.W., L.I.C.S.W., CGP Amy, a Clinical Sex Therapy Associate with Northampton Sex Therapy Associates in Florence, MA, provides individual, couples and group therapy addressing a wide range of issues related to sex, sexual functioning, relationship structures, sexual identity and gender identity. Amy received her Masters in Social Work from the Smith College School for Social Work. Following Smith, Amy's passion for group work led her to The Psychotherapy Institute's Group Therapy Training Program, an intensive two-year advanced training program based in Berkeley, CA.  A Certified Group Psychotherapist, Amy is also Gottman Method Level I and II Couples Therapy trained and is currently working towards board certification as an AASECT Certified Sex Therapist

 

15-332c: The Trauma Whisperers II: Advanced Methods and Techniques

Daniel Buccino, L.C.S.W.-C., B.C.D.


Over the last six years, Trauma Whisperers workshops have become popular nationally. In response to repeated inquiries, this new, clinically relevant workshop is meant to build on the general strategies offered in Trauma Whisperers workshops and offer participants more advanced technical approaches for working with patients with complex trauma issues. Theoretical approaches considered will include object relations, Lacanian, narrative, and feedback-informed treatments. Through careful video review of the presenter’s and other’s work in treatment, participants will be encouraged to share their own clinical dilemmas in trauma treatment in order to create the most clinically meaningful learning experience. In offering strategies to help clinicians sustain their work with often difficult and confounding patients, we will also consider contemporary approaches to ensure treatment accountability.

Learning Objectives coming soon!

Faculty: Daniel L. Buccino, L.C.S.W.-C., B.C.D. is the Founder and Director of the Baltimore Psychotherapy Institute and Clinical Supervisor and Student Coordinator in the Community Psychiatry Program at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore. David serves on the clinical faculties at the University of Maryland School of Social Work, the Smith College School for Social Work, and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

 

15-333c: A Bilingual's Healing Journey: In Search of the Language of the Heart

Maria Elena Oliva, M.S.W, L.C.S.W.

The goal of this presentation is to highlight the crucial role that language plays in the life of the bilingual client and the impact on the therapeutic process, specifically when therapy takes place in the client’s second language. I argue that the emotional life of the bilingual individual lives in their mother tongue and why linguistic competence in the clinical provider is important. The bilingual client is often at a disadvantage when the intimacy of their culture and ability to express their affective experience cannot be accessed in their second language. Case vignettes will be used to illustrate the important role of language in treatment, how language switching serves a defensive function and how the mother tongue holds affective ties that embrace the bilingual individual. Language is in the spotlight in therapeutic work we do.

Learning Objectives coming soon!

Faculty: Maria Elena Oliva, M.S.W., L.C.S.W., is a clinical supervisor in Bridgeport, CT in a program for young adults ages 18 -25. She is currently working toward a PhD at Smith college School for Social Work. Her areas of interest are bilingual's in therapy in their second language, cultural and linguistic competence in work with Latino/a children and their families, attachment and the impact of trauma across the lifespan.

 

15-334c: Eating Disorders: Etiology and Treatment Approaches from Adolescence to Adulthood

Chelsea MacCaughelty, M.S.W.

Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder. This course will focus on the spectrum of eating disorders, specifically including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder. There will be some focus on and discussion of the change in diagnostic criteria from DSM-IV-TR to DSM-5 and the rationale for the changes. Predisposing, precipitating, and perpetuating evidence-based factors related to the development of eating disorders will be reviewed and discussed as well as how eating disorders may be viewed through a biopsychosocial lens. Potential medical complications, warning signs and symptoms, common transference and countertransference dynamics when working with clients with eating disorders, and useful concepts for understanding eating disorders will be highlighted. Lastly, a variety of treatment modalities (CBT, Mentalization-based, DBT, ACT, family systems) and their efficacy in the treatment of eating disorders will be reviewed.

Learning Objectives coming soon!

Faculty: Chelsea MacCaughelty, L.C.S.W.; Co-developer of the Eating Disorder Track (EDT) as well as Clinical Staff Social Worker at The Menninger Clinic in Houston, Texas; Doctoral Student at Smith College School of Social Work; Member of research group examining efficacy of EDT. Chelsea graduated with Bachelor and Master of Social Work degrees from The University of Georgia before completing a Post-Graduate Fellowship on the Eating Disorders Program (EDP) and Professionals in Crisis (PIC) unit at Menninger.

 

15-335c: Collaborating With Clients Within Winnicottian and Ego Psychological Frameworks: Turning Case Management Into Psychotherapy.

Jean-Paul Des Pres, L.I.C.S.W.

In our western culture, emotional and functional independence has become the hallmark of mental health. In this context, the increasing number of mental health care specializations dictates that the direct provision of support service coordination on the part of the therapist is at odds with theory and technique aimed at fostering independence.
But, is it really?
The aim of this presentation is to shed light on the philosophical and cultural origins of the split between case management and psychotherapy and to reframe our understanding of direct service procurement and coordination as a sometimes vital component of the larger therapeutic process. Toward this end, common case management activities will be examined from object relations (Winnicott) and ego psychological (Goldstien) perspectives. For clinicians familiar with Winicott’s ideas re normal development and/or supportive psychotherapy, this presentation will sharpen their understanding of the way that case management with clients and be incorporated into therapy sessions. For clinicians who may be new to these ideas, the presentation will be an interesting eye opener, and one that may increase their comfort level with an expanded notion of what it means to be a therapist.

Learning Objectives coming soon!

Faculty Bio coming soon!