Close Window

I visited Smith the fall of my senior year in high school and fell in love with the campus and the people. There’s such a positive energy about Smith. When I sat in on classes and saw how rigorous the work was and how motivated the students were, I thought, this is where I need to be.

My first year, I took a broad range of subjects. Government emerged as a central theme. I plan to be involved in politics in some way, to be a voice for change, either as an attorney or a state representative or a senator. Smith has taught me that as long as I have tenable arguments and can back them up with coherent and thoughtful statements, I can confidently speak my mind and listen to opposing points of view with an open mind.

I attended the University of South Africa in Cape Town my junior year. I don’t think I would have dared to go abroad if my friends and counselors at Smith had not encouraged me. Living in another culture has given me confidence. I took a course in South Africa called Theater in Education. Being confident onstage and knowing how to present myself are assets that I also use as a Gold Key guide at Smith.

I know I’m on the right path at Smith. I’m broadening my skill set and knowledge, so that no matter what I end up doing, I’ll be prepared.

Video

Engineering Social Justice

Donna Riley, Associate Professor of Engineering
Traditionally, engineers have been trained to be “value neutral,” focusing on solving the problem at hand without always considering the social and moral consequences of their work. Donna Riley argues that, with a shift in priorities to emphasize helping people over earning profits, engineers can strive to achieve not only efficient solutions but a more just society as well.

Part of the Scholars in Studio video series

Tags:
Video

Smiffenpoofs Celebrate 75 Years

Smith's Smiffenpoofs, the oldest collegiate women's a cappella group in the country, held celebration concert with alumnae on Saturday, Nov. 5, in which they performed selections from their vast repertoire, compiled since 1936. Don't miss the special message from crapappella at the end of the video.

Video

Minding the Achievement Gap

Sam Intrator, Professor of Education and Child Study
It’s widely accepted that higher education leads to better life outcomes, yet college remains an unfulfilled hope for many young Americans. At the same time, the U.S. is falling behind much of the developed world in measures of academic achievement. Sam Intrator considers the merits of three different approaches to narrowing the achievement gap to the benefit of individuals and society.

Part of the Scholars in Studio video series

Tags:

Scholars in Studio Launch

Image and Link
Preview Image: 
Video

Poetry Reading by Jane Hirshfield

Jane Hirshfield’s work has been called “passionate and radiant” by The New York Times. Her poetry is an extension of a life both lived and examined, and her carefully crafted poems range from elegiac to joyful, reflective to restive.

The reading took place on October 4, 2011, in Weinstein Auditorium, Wright Hall. With an introduction by Poetry Center Director Ellen Watson.

Video

Speaking Out On Quiet

Kevin Quashie, Associate Professor of Afro-American Studies
Kevin Quashie takes a closer look at the iconic image from the 1960s of American sprinters Tommie Smith and Juan Carlos raising their fists in protest on the medal podium at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City. Their display, Quashie argues, was more than an angry act of defiance; it was a quiet moment of personal revolution.
Part of the Scholars in Studio video series

 

Tags:
Video

Environmental Refugees

Greg White, Professor of Government and Faculty Director of the Global Studies Center
Among the concerns about human-caused climate change is the specter of tens of millions of so-called environmental refugees spreading north into Western Europe and North America. Greg White argues that the estimates of potential environmental refugees are both greatly exaggerated and politically motivated.

Part of the Scholars in Studio video series

Learn more about the intellectual life of Smith College

Insight
An online journal of ideas and creative thinking from Smith College
www.smith.edu/insight/

The Centers for Engagement, Learning and Leadership
Smith's four interdisciplinary centers integrate student and scholarly interests within a real-world context
www.smith.edu/acad_centers.php

The Smith Design for Learning
Smith's plan to re-imagine a liberal arts education for today's complex world
www.smith.edu/giving/design.php

Tags:
Video

Reconstructing the Mugamma

Donna Divine, Morningstar Family Professor in the field of Jewish Studies and Professor of Government
One man’s protest quickly became a movement that toppled governments in Tunisia and Egypt, led to revolution in Libya, and incited uprisings against regimes throughout the Middle East. From Tahrir Square to Tripoli, the Arab Spring has gripped the attention of the world. Will these events lead to real democratic reforms in the region, or will the familiar cycle of oppression and unrest continue? Donna Divine considers the possibilities.

Part of the Scholars in Studio video series

Learn more about the intellectual life of Smith College

Insight
An online journal of ideas and creative thinking from Smith College
www.smith.edu/insight/

The Centers for Engagement, Learning and Leadership
Smith's four interdisciplinary centers integrate student and scholarly interests within a real-world context
www.smith.edu/acad_centers.php

The Smith Design for Learning
Smith's plan to re-imagine a liberal arts education for today's complex world
www.smith.edu/giving/design.php

Tags:
Close Window

What really sold me on Smith was the Museum of Art, which is one of the best at an American liberal arts college. Many of my classes are held there and use the collection. The museums concentration is  unique in that it offers both academic and practical museum experience. And I am lucky enough to have the director and chief curator of the museum, Jessica Nicoll, as my museums concentration adviser, so what could be better?  

As part of the concentration, I work as a museum educator, giving tours to students from elementary to high school age. We are trained to use a style of questioning that helps students to interact with the museum’s pieces and build a narrative around a piece based upon their own observations. Since many schools have cut arts programs, I think it’s especially important for museums to have programs that help to develop visual literacy in children.

Next year I will be interning under the curator of painting and sculpture at the National Portrait Gallery at the Smithsonian. I will also complete a seminar that explores the history, functions and meanings of museums in society today as well as an independent research project of my choosing.