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How to Recognize Plagiarism

Examples

Word for Word | Paraphrasing

Example 5 of 5

A word-for-word example of plagiarism is one in which the writer directly quotes a passage or passages from an author's work without the use of proper quotation marks.

Read the example carefully!

Original Source Material: An important characteristic of instructional-design theories is that they are design oriented (or goal oriented). This makes them very different from what most people usually think of as theories. Theories can be thought of as dealing with cause-and-effect relationships or with flows of events in natural processes, keeping in mind that those effects or events are almost always probabilistic (i.e., the cause increases the chances of the stated effect occurring) rather than deterministic (i.e., the cause always results in the stated effect).

Source: Reigeluth, C. M. (1999). What is instructional design theory and how is it changing? In C. M. Reigeluth (ed.), Instructional-design theories and models volume II: A new paradigm of instructional theory, (pp. 1-29). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Plagiarized Version Correct Version

Whether they are probabilistic (i.e., the cause increases the chances of the stated effect occurring) or they are deterministic (i.e., the cause always results in the stated effect), we can think of theories as dealing with cause-and-effect relationships or with flows of natural processes.

References: Reigeluth, C.M. (1999). What is instructional design theory and how is it changing? In C. M. Reigeluth (Ed.), Instructional-design theories and models volume II: A new paradigm of instructional theory, (pp. 1-29). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Reigeluth (1999) states that we can think of theories "... as dealing with cause-and-effect relationships or with flows of events in natural processes," and goes on to say that they may be either "probabilistic (i.e., the cause increases the chances of the stated effect occurring) rather than deterministic (i.e., the cause always results in the stated effect)" (p. 7).

References: Reigeluth, C. M. (1999). What is instructional design theory and how is it changing? In C. M. Reigeluth (ed.), Instructional-design theories and models volume II: A new paradigm of instructional theory, (pp. 1-29). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Explanation: This example of student written work is plagiarized. The student re-organized the original material, and inserted portions of the material in different places within the new paper, but it is still word-for-word plagiarism. Although the work was cited in the references, no credit was given to the author of the text and quotation marks were not used.

Explanation: Note in this example that the passage begins with the author and year of the publication. Quotation marks are used to indicate that the several passages are word-for-word citations from the original document. The author is also listed in the references.

Examples 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5



Credits

This tutorial site was developed by the Instructional Systems Technology Department in the School of Education at Indiana University Bloomington to offer students a chance to learn to recognize plagiarism. The Smith College Information Literacy Team is grateful for permission to use this tutorial as part of its program.

  • Content Design: Elizabeth Boling and Theodore Frick
  • Instructional Development and Formative Evaluation: Meltem Albayrak-Karahan, Joseph Defazio, Noriko Matsumura
   
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