Friends Events

See the Libraries' "News & Events" page for more upcoming Library events.

Spring 2016

Patricia Palmieri ​Spinsters and Bachelors: Researching Singles in 20th Century America
Wednesday, March 23, 2016
5:00 p.m., Alumnae Gymnasium Level 1

Social historian Patricia A. Palmieri has spent years combing through ​diaries, letters, magazines, sex questionnaires and lonely hearts club records​ ​to uncover how ​society has viewed ​never-married singles and how they have interpreted their ​own ​lives. She also presents their contributions to American culture. Palmieri's research extends from the Gilded Age to present times.​​ ​

Palmieri is the author of In Adamless Eden: The Communityof Women Faculty at Wellesley College, 1875-1930 (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1995.) She holds a doctorate from the Harvard University, and has taught courses on U.S. women's and family history, American Studies, and Gender Studies at many colleges and universities.​

Amy Ellis Nutt
Photo courtesy of Eva Nies.
Trans-formations: Writing and Understanding Transgender Lives
Thursday, April 14, 2016
12 noon, Neilson Library Browsing Room​

President Kathleen McCartney will introduce ​Amy Ellis Nutt, author of the recent New York Times bestseller, Becoming Nicole: The Transformation of an American Family, about a transgender identical twin.

Nutt graduated from Smith in 1977 with a double-major in English and Philosophy. She has Masters degrees in Philosophy from M.I.T. and journalism from Columbia University. In 2011, when she was at the Newark, N.J. Star-Ledger, she won the Pulitzer Prize in feature writing for her narrative investigation, The Wreck of the Lady Mary. Two years earlier she was a finalist for the Pulitzer in feature writing for a story which became her first book of non-fiction, “Shadows Bright as Glass.” She has since co-authored the New York Times bestseller The Teenage Brain with Smith alumna Frances Jensen ’78.  In 2013 she was the recipient of a Smith Medal. Currently, she lives in Washington D.C. where she is a science writer for The Washington Post. Her beat is the brain.​

 

Past FSCL Events.