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Sharon Harper Moon Studies and Star Scratches Sharon Harper

Thursday, December 5, 2013

5:00 pm  ::  Neilson Browsing Room, Neilson Library

Space as Metaphor-Sky: A Useful Foil

In her art practice, Sharon Harper (Professor of Visual Arts, Visual and Environmental Studies at Harvard University) takes a group of cameras and experiments with them to find a way to engage a particular space that transforms it into metaphor. The work is a way to find modes of 'knowing' embedded in photographic language, and to find the ways human consciousness is connected through technology to our broader surroundings. This talk will look at her artistic practice as a way to perceive, process and generate meaning in response to particular sites.

Sharon Harper received an MFA in photography and related media from the School of Visual Art in New York. Her work explores technology and perception. It is in permanent collections at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, The Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, the Harvard Art Museums, the Portland Art Museum, Portland Oregon, the Nelson-Atkins Museum in Kansas City, Missouri, and The New York Public Library among other collections. It is represented by Galerie Stefan Roepke, Cologne and Rick Wester Fine Art, New York and Bridgette Mayer Gallery in Philadelphia. She is currently a Professor of Visual Arts, Visual and Environmental Studies at Harvard University.

Presented by the Kahn Institute yearlong project Placing Space. Free and open to the public.

 

Postmonitions of a Peripatetic Professor Book Launch, Reading & Signing

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

4:30 pm  ::  Neilson Browsing Room, Neilson Library

Postmonitions of a Peripatetic Professor

Join us as we celebrate the publication of Postmonitions of a Peripatetic Professor (Levellers Press, 2013), the memoirs of Kahn Institute Senior Fellow, octogenarian sociologist, ethnographer, writer, teacher, and world traveler Peter Rose. The book, which includes a forward by Rose's former student, novelist and playwright Andrea Hairston, the Louise Wolff Kahn 1931 Professor in the Theater Department at Smith describes his colorful academic life and some of his many extracurricular excursions. Readings from the book will be followed by a reception and book signing.

Presented by the Kahn Institute; Levellers Press; the Smith College Departments of Afro-American Studies, American Studies, and Sociology; and the Poetry Center. Free and open to the public.

 

Narratives of Dress: What Can a Garment Say?
Narratives of Dress: Student Photo Shoot

Monday, Tuesday, & Wednesday, October 21,22, and 23, 2013

11:30 am-1:30 pm & 4:30-6:00 pm :: Room 003, Garden Level, Campus Center

What do students wear? What does the attire of current students say about their lives and lifestyles? What kinds of information about modern culture and society will it convey to the historians of the future? Students in all classes are invited to participate in a "research it forward" project on those questions by having a photograph taken to show their typical daily attire. Photos will be taken in the Campus Center (Garden Level) and participation is free. Photographs taken during these sessions will be displayed as part of the Narratives of Dress symposium (see below).

The Kahn Institute is one of the sponsors of Narratives of Dress: What Can a Garment Say?, a two-day symposium on the role and importance of dress in the study of women, culture, and history.

 

Narratives of Dress: What Can a Garment Say?


Symposium—Narratives of Dress: What Can A Garment Say?

Friday, & Saturday, November 1 & 2, 2013

Friday 1:00-5:45 pm, Saturday 9:00 am-4:30 pm :: Carroll Room, Campus Center

This two-day symposium will bring together experts from the United States and Great Britain to speak about the role and importance of dress in the study of women, culture, and history. Speakers will consider the place of dress and costume in academic classrooms and museums, and will speak to the value of studying dress when researching the lives of women over time. The symposium sessions are free, but pre-registration is required. For a complete schedule or to pre-register, visit http://www.smith.edu/narrativesofdress/ .

The Kahn Institute is one of the sponsors of Narratives of Dress: What Can a Garment Say?, a two-day symposium on the role and importance of dress in the study of women, culture, and history.

 

Anne Knowles Anne Knowles

Friday, November 8, 2013

12:00 pm (Noon) ::  Carroll Room, Campus Center

Visualizing Historical Space

The many modes of mapping enable one to visualize and explore the spatial realm of experience throughout human history. This presentation will explain how geographic methods, including GIS, can provide fresh, provocative perspectives on seemingly well-worn subjects.  Examples including the battle of Gettysburg, American industry, and the Holocaust suggest how much digital mapping can reveal about human perception, blindness, movement, control, and agency.

Jointly presented by the Kahn Institute short-term project Digital Humanities and the yearlong project Placing Space. Free pizza for the first 50 attendees. Open to the public.

 

Marvin Heiferman Marvin Heiferman

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

5:00 pm  ::  Carroll Room, Campus Center

Why We Look & What We See

In a world in which images are being produced and shared in record numbers, it is important to take a step back and consider what that might mean. Because photography is used by so many people and for so many reasons, it becomes impossible to tell any single or simple story about the medium, and it would be a mistake to try. In this presentation, Marvin Heiferman suggests that it will take less traditional and more interdisciplinary approaches to photography to better understand imaging's history, impact, and possibilities. Based upon past project and current news stories, Heiferman will address photography's power and malleability, exploring how the medium is now more experiential than documentary, and examining why it is not only harder to describe, but also to control.

Curator and writer Marvin Heiferman organizes projects about photography and visual culture for institutions that include the Museum of Modern Art, Smithsonian Institution, International Center of Photography, Whitney Museum of American Art, and the New Museum.  A contributing editor to Art in America, Heiferman has also written for The New York Times, Artforum, The New York Times, Artforum, Bookforum, Mousse, ArtNews, Aperture, and BOMB.  His most recent book is Photography Changes Everything (Aperture, 2012), and new entries to Heiferman’s Twitter-based project, WHY WE LOOK (@whywelook) are posted daily.

Presented by the Kahn Institute semester-long project Regarding Images. Free and open to the public.

 

 

 

 

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