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SPRING 2010 KAHN INSTITUTE LECTURES

 
 

Randolph Hester: Geometry and Activist Ecology

Randolph HesterRandolph Hester will build on the previously introduced idea of recombinant and reciprocal geometries, using the story of efforts to save the black-faced spoonbill (Platalea minor) from extinction to demonstrate how the creation of detailed geometries can clarify and sometimes resolve conflicts over land use as “territory” from the regional to the intimate scale. He will present an overview of the habitat needs of the endangered species and competing science; the spatial requirements of dominant and conflicting land uses in this case in Taiwan and Korea; the land use geometries of alternative economies including fishing, value-added products, ecotourism and cultural tourism; the geometries of the daily life patterns of local residents; and present a means of resolution through accurate and creative synthesis of the geometries. Along the way, ecological activism at both the grassroots and international levels will unfold as genuine green and green washing.

Randolph Hester is the 2009-2010 William Allan Neilson Professor in Landscape Studies and is a Professor of Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning and Urban
Design at the University of California, Berkeley.

This Neilson Professor Lecture is part of the Neilson-Kahn Seminar and the LSS 100 course Issues in Landscape Studies.

Monday, February 15, 2010

 

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Carolyn Dinshaw: How Soon Is Now? Problems of the Present, Medieval & Modern

Carolyn DinshawA monk follows a bird beyond the cloister and upon returning discovers he’s been gone for 300 years. A king is led into a cave by a royal pygmy and emerges to find an entirely different language and ruler in his land because it’s over 200 years later. In this talk Carolyn Dinshaw, Professor of English at New York University, will examine several such Rip van Winkle stories from the Middle Ages, as well as a retelling of such a tale in modern times, to contemplate the perplexing nature of the present, the now. In the process, she will demonstrate that the everyday temporal linearity we think we experience is extraordinarily fragile, and the effects of time are queerer than we might suspect.

Carolyn Dinshaw is a Professor of English and Social & Cultural Analysis at New York University. This lecture is presented by the Kahn Institute project Telling Time: Its Meaning and Measurement.

Thursday, February 25, 2010

 

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Marcia McNally: From Flyway to Shophouse: Neighborhood Landscapes in the Glocal World

Marcia McNallyDoes the neighborhood landscape matter? Whether as a unit of analysis for action research, a site for professional practice, a common denominator in cross-cultural comparisons, or the landscape of our daily lives, the answer is a resounding, “You bet.” Marcia McNally, Associate Adjunct Professor of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning at the University of California, Berkeley, will present four frames of the same view from research sites in Taipei, Taiwan; Kyoto, Japan; and Los Angeles and Berkeley, California that underscore the importance of the neighborhood in our glocal (simultaneously global and local) lives.

 

Marcia McNally is an Associate Adjunct Professor of Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning at the University of California, Berkeley.

This lecture is part of the Neilson-Kahn Seminar and the LSS 100 course Issues in Landscape Studies.

Monday, March 1, 2010

 

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Amy Rothenberg, ND: The A Cappella Singer Who Lost Her Voice and Other Tales from Natural Medicine

Amy Rothenberg, NDAmy Rothenberg ND, a licensed naturopathic physician, teacher, and author, will share case studies and observations from her experience working with patients over the past 24 years. She will discuss the philosophical principles and practical applications of complementary medicine both in the clinic and in the training of physicians. Dr. Rothenberg will also explore and elaborate on the potential for collaboration across medical research and practice, as well as in medical education.

Dr. Amy Rothenberg, ND is a licensed naturopathic
physician, teacher & author whose practice is based in Amherst Massachusetts.

This lecture is presented by the Kahn Institute project Wellness & Disease.

Wednesday, March 3, 2010

 

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Setha Low: Rethinking Urban Parks, Social Justice and Cultural Diversity

Setha LowUrban public spaces are where race, class, gender, age, sexual preference, ethnicity, and ability differences are experienced and negotiated in a safe forum for political action, communication, and democratic practice. Those spaces offer an empirical means for thinking about cultural diversity in the creation of a more just city. In this lecture, Setha Low, Professor of Environmental Psychology, Geography, Women's Studies, and Anthropology at City University of New York, examines the difficulties in defining and studying what constitutes an equitable distribution of public space, how those issues necessitate employing a broader framework of justice to utilize the lessons learned from planning and design practice, and how to encourage the use of public spaces for democratic practices. She argues that three dimensions of justice—distributive, procedural, and interactional—are essential to address the multiple kinds of perceived injustice.

Setha Low is a Professor of Environmental Psychology, Geography, Women’s Studies, and Anthropolgy, at City University of New York. This lecture is part of the Neilson-Kahn Seminar and the LSS 100 course Issues in Landscape Studies.

Monday, March 22, 2010

 

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Sean Carroll: The Origin of the Universe and the Arrow of Time

Sean CarrollOne of the most obvious facts about the universe is that the past is different from the future.  We can remember yesterday, but not tomorrow; we can turn an egg into an omelet, but can't turn an omelet into an egg.  That's the arrow of time, which is consistent throughout the observable universe.  The arrow can be explained by assuming that the very early universe was extremely orderly, and disorder has been increasing ever since. But why did the universe start out so orderly? Sean Carroll will talk about the nature of time, the origin of entropy, and how
what happened before the Big Bang may be responsible for the arrow of time we observe today.

Sean Carroll is a Senior Research Associate in Physics at the California Institute of Technology. This lecture is presented by the Kahn Institute project Telling Time: Its Meaning and Measurement.

Thursday, April 1, 2010

 

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Randolph Hester: Sex, Lies, and Real Estate

Randolph Hester Many planners believe that sustainable American cities must be somewhat denser, and that exurban development must be controlled to allow space for ecosystems to function to provide food, water, clean air and other resources within the bioregion. Yet density and limited extent are seldom successfully addressed in city making. In this lecture, Randolph Hester explains why through an exploration of the creation of a Big Wild Greenbelt around Los Angeles, a case where extent is being limited. He will describe the primary conflicts that arose during this effort, the techniques that worked and did not work as it progressed, and the lessons learned from it..

 

Randolph Hester is the 2009-2010 William Allan Neilson Professor in Landscape Studies and is a Professor of Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning and Urban
Design at the University of California, Berkeley. This Neilson Professor Lecture is part of the Neilson-Kahn Seminar and the LSS 100 course Issues in Landscape Studies..

Monday, April 5, 2010

 

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Gregory Miller: The Behavioral and Biological Residue of Childhood Adversity

Gregory MillerChildren who are exposed to social and economic adversity in the early years of life show increased susceptibility to the chronic diseases of aging when they reach their 50s and 60s. These findings raise a difficult mechanistic question: How does early adversity “get under the skin” in a manner that is sufficiently persistent to affect vulnerability to diseases that arise many decades later? In this lecture Gregory Miller will discuss findings from his ongoing research, which suggest that early adversity is programmed into cells of the immune system at the level of the genome, resulting in a pro-inflammatory phenotype that probably contributes to the chronic diseases of aging. He will also discuss newer findings that identify the family context as a powerful moderator of these effects, explaining how conditions such as high levels of maternal warmth in early life can offset the pro-inflammatory residue of childhood adversity.

Gregory Miller is an Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. This lecture is presented by the Kahn Institute project Wellness & Disease.

Tuesday, April 6, 2010

 

 
 
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Frances Moore Lappé: Liberation Ecology: Shedding Disempowering Ideas to Create the World We Want

Frances Moore LappePolar ice is melting even faster than scientists had predicted only a few years ago, and each year we’re losing forest that covers an area as big as Greece. In only a few years, the number of hungry people worldwide has grown by a fifth, which means that hunger now harms more than a billion of us. In this lecture, Frances Moore Lappé explains how we can make a planet-wide turn toward life if we break free of a mental map—a set of reigning but misleading ideas—that disempower us, taking us down, down, down and reinforcing feelings of despair. She will discuss why nothing is more important than examining these disempowering ideas and replacing them with evidence-based ways of seeing that energize us to engage.

Frances Moore Lappé is a social change and democracy activist and author, and she is the co-founder of the Small Planet Institute.

This lecture is part of the Neilson-Kahn Seminar and the LSS 100 course Issues in Landscape Studies.

Monday, April 19, 2010

 

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Geneviève Rail: Confessions of the Flesh: Obesity, Medicalization, and (Bio)Pedagogies of Impending Epidemics

Genevieve RailThe recent construction of an "obesity epidemic" has been fueled by epidemiologically-based studies recuperated by the media and suggesting the rapid acceleration of obesity rates in the Western world. Studies linking obesity to ill-health have exploded with recipes on how to wage "war" on obesity and dispose of "domestic terrorists." Professor Rail discusses the medicalization of fatness and the recuperation of the rhetorical and biopedagogical strategy of "impending epidemic." She shows how obesity scientists have established an "obesity discourse" within which obese and "at-risk" bodies are constructed as lazy and expensive bodies that should be submitted to disciplinary technologies, expert investigation and regulation. She examines the politics of evidence in obesity science and explores the connections between obesity discourses and the ways in which health and the body are discursively constructed by young Canadian women, and also comments on the biopedagogical mechanics at play in the lives of these women and their links to popular visual culture. Using Foucault’s formulation of the "confessions of the flesh," she theorizes how obesity discourses discipline subjects to believe and ultimately take part in processes supposedly leading to their "salvation."

Geneviève Rail is a Professor and is the Principal of the Simone de Beauvior Institute at Concordia University, Montreal, Canada.

This lecture is presented by the Kahn Institute project Wellness & Disease.

Tuesday, April 20, 2010

 

 
 
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Carol Mancusi-Ungaro
Is Art Timeless?

Carol Mancusi-UngaroThe irreparable aging of materials often deprives a work of art of its original vitality. Even so, the artist invariably remains present in the way she worked; the way she thought; and the way she conceived of an idea. Our challenge is to look beyond the degradation of the tangible elements to the indestructible imagination of the artist that defies the passage of time.

Carol Mancusi-Ungaro is the Associate Director for Conservation & Research, Whitney Museum of Art and is the Founding Director of the Center for the Technical Study of Art at Harvard University.

This lecture is presented by the Kahn Institute project Telling Time: Its Meaning and Measurement.

Thursday, April 22, 2010

7:30 pm Weinstein Auditorium, Wright Hall

 

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