Of Human Bondage: Perspectives on Addiction
Symposium Program

This 2-day interdisciplinary symposium on addiction, which featured lectures by and discussions with internationally-known scholars and leaders, addressed the addiction issue in different cultures and over times: from the earliest known anthropological evidence of human addiction to the latest research on the effects of addictive drugs in the brain. Talks demonstrated how definitions of addiction have changed over time, the legal and cultural contexts of addiction (for instance, among 19th-century artists and 20th-century jazz musicians), and the future of drugs such as Prozac. In addition, a panel of therapeutic practitioners discussed the current state of their field.

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Program Schedule:

  • Friday, October 13
    • 4:30 p.m. "Changing your Mind: Drugs in the Brain," Bertha Madras, Harvard Medical School
    • 8:00 p.m. First Keynote Address: "What is Addiction?" Jerome Jaffe, University of Maryland Medical School
  • Saturday, October 14
    • 9:00 a.m. Coffee Addiction in History
    • 9:30 a.m. "The Archaeology of Addiction," Richard Rudgley, Oxford University
    • 10:30: a.m. "'Addiction' in Homer and Aristotle," Harold Skulsky, Smith College
    • 11:15 a.m. "Absinthe: Chemistry and Culture," Lâle Burk, Smith College
    • 1:00 p.m. Second Keynote Address: "The First Cocaine Epidemic," David Musto, Yale University
    • 2:30 p.m. Panel: Clinical Approaches to Addiction Alan Dayno, Davina Miller, and Theodore Miller
    • 3:30 p.m. "Gray Matters: Prozac, Cocaine, and the Meanings of Medicines," Pamela Korsmeyer, freelance writer
    • 4:15 p.m. "Jazz and Addiction," Richard Davis, University of Wisconsin (Dr. Madras' talk takes place in McConnell B-05, the Saturday morning talks in Seelye 201; all other events are in Neilson Browsing Room.)

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About our Speakers

    Bertha Madras, one of the world's leading researchers into the biochemistry of addiction, is Professor of Psychobiology in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Madras was the subject of a lengthy photo-essay in this spring's issue of the Harvard Magazine.
    Jerome Jaffe has been a pioneer in addiction research and methadone treatment. He was the first United States "Drug Czar" (1971-73) and later Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and its Addiction Research Center. Now "retired," he consults internationally. His remarkable career is described in detail in Michael Massing's The Fix.
    Richard Rudgley studied social anthropology at the University of London, and ethnology and prehistory at Oxford. His most recent book is The Encyclopedia of Addictive Substances. Another book, The Alchemy of Culture: Intoxicants in Society (published in America under the title Essential Substances: A Cultural History of Intoxicants in Society) was the first winner of the Prometheus Award, launched by the British Museum Press in 1991.
    Harold Skulsky is Mary Augusta Jordan Professor of English at Smith College and a member of Smith's Program in the History of Science and Technology.
    Lâle Burk is Lecturer in Chemistry at Smith College and a member of Smith's Program in the History of Science and Technology.
    David Musto is Professor of Child Psychiatry, Lecturer in American Studies, and Professor of the History of Medicine and Psychiatry at Yale University. His study of The American Disease: Origins of Narcotic Control (Oxford University Press) is now in its third edition.
    Alan Dayno is Medical Director of the Community Substance Abuse Center, West Springfield, Mass.
    Davina Miller, L.I.C.S.W., is a private practitioner and consultant in Northampton, and the director of the Eating Disorders Partial Hospitalization program at Franklin Medical Center in Greenfield.
    Theodore Miller, M.D., is the Director of The Brattleboro Retreat in Brattleboro, VT.
    Pamela Korsmeyer did her doctoral work at Yale on addictions in America; she is now a freelance writer.
    Richard Davis is a jazz bassist, known throughout the music world for his success in bringing the bass to new heights as a solo instrument in both classical and jazz traditions. He is Professor of Music at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, where he has taught since 1977. See also http://www.globaldialog.com/~rdavis/index.html/

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History of Science and Technology
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