Home
Engineering at Smith
Faculty
Our Alumnae
About the Program
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
Bachelor of Arts in Engineering
The Minor in Engineering
Departmental Honors
Forms
Courses
Internship & Research Opportunities
Student Engineering Organizations
News & Events
Faculty & Staff

Sarah J. Moore

Assistant Professor of Engineering

email Send E–mail office Office: Ford Hall 116 phone Phone: (413) 585-7005
Curriculum vitae (PDF)
Sarah J. Moore

Sarah Moore teaches and conducts research at the intersection of engineering and biology. Her research focuses on biomolecular engineering, primarily engineering proteins for applications in medicine. Current research in the Moore Lab includes engineering proteins for diagnosing and treating cancer, and developing methods to enable protein therapeutics to access drug targets in the central nervous system.

 

In 2006, Moore graduated from Princeton University with a bachelor of science in engineering from the Department of Chemical Engineering. In 2008, she received her master of science in Bioengineering from Stanford University, a department jointly housed in the School of Engineering and the School of Medicine. Moore continued her education at Stanford and in 2012 completed her doctoral degree in Bioengineering. Her Ph.D. research included engineering highly stable proteins for molecular imaging of cancer, for improved detection and surgical resection.

 

Moore joined the faculty at Smith College in 2012. She has previously taught Engineering for Everyone; Fundamental Engineering Principles; Introduction to Biomedical Engineering; and Engineering and Cancer. Students who have conducted research in the Moore Lab come from a variety of majors, including engineering, biology, biochemistry, and neuroscience.

 

Whenever possible, Moore enjoys spending time outside, including running, cycling, backpacking, snowshoeing, and rock climbing.

 

Selected Publications

S.J. Moore, M.G. Hayden Gephart, J.M. Bergen, Y.S. Su, H. Rayburn, M.P. Scott, J.R. Cochran. “Engineered knottin peptide enables non-invasive optical imaging of intracranial medulloblastoma.” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 2013.110(36): 14598-14603.

 

S.J. Moore, C.L. Leung, H.K. Norton, and J.R. Cochran. “Engineering Agatoxin, a cystine-knot peptide from spider venom, as a molecular probe for in vivo tumor imaging.” PLOS ONE, 2013. 8: e60498.

 

H. Jiang, S.J. Moore, S. Liu, H. Liu, Z. Miao, F.V. Cochran, Y. Liu, M. Tian, J.R. Cochran, H. Zhang, and Z. Cheng. “A novel radiofluorinated agouti-related protein for tumor angiogenesis imaging.” Amino Acids, 2013. DOI: 10.1007/s00726-012-1391-y.

 

S.J. Moore and J.R. Cochran. “Engineering Knottins as Novel Binding Agents.” Methods in Enzymology, 2012. 503: 223-251.

 

S.J. Moore, C.L. Leung, and J.R. Cochran. “Knottins: Disulfide-bonded Therapeutic and Diagnostic Peptides.” Drug Discovery Today: Technologies, 2012. 9: e3-e11.

 

Selected Honors and Awards