Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Deineka
Russian, 1899-1969
Driving God/Jehova Out of the Factory. c. 1920s
Lithograph and screenprinting in color on paper
Gift of Mrs. D. Spencer Byard (Margaret Mather, class of 1933)
Photograph by Stephen Petegorsky

Deineka’s poster uses classic propaganda techniques in conveying its message. A caricatured image of an Orthodox priest, derisively called “Grisha” in the text, is chased from a factory by two smiling Soviet workers on a locomotive, implying the triumph of technology over religion. The poem beneath—a short, crude, sing-song ditty—describes the scene in a mocking tone. By using ridicule, caricature, stylized figures, and vernacular slang, the poster seeks to mask the underlying violence of its message by dehumanizing the people and beliefs it seeks to eradicate.

Translation
Locomotive—Grisha
            is running out of the gate at full steam
Watch out, you company of priests:
            God, Jehova, and Allah!