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  The Minor in Archaeology

Programs are to be arranged by the student in consultation with her adviser for the minor and should be submitted to the Faculty Advisory Committee by the advisor for review.

Not more than two courses from a student's major may count toward the minor. Only 4 credits of a language course may count toward the Archaeology minor.

 

Students interested in archaeology are encouraged to speak with any of the advisers in the Program. ALWAYS check the main Smith College Course Catalog as well as the Five College Course Catalog for relevant courses.

 

Below is a listing of recent and upcoming courses, at Smith and other of the 5 Colleges, that count towards the Minor in Archeology.

ARC 112 Archaeological Geology of Rock Art and Stone Artifacts 
Same as GEO 112. What makes a mineral or a rock particularly useful as a stone tool or attractive as a sculpture? Students in this course will explore this and other questions by applying geological approaches and techniques in studying various examples or rock art and stone artifacts to learn more about human behavior, ecology and cultures in the past. This exploration across traditional boundaries between archaeology and earth science will include background topics of mineral and rock formation, weathering processes, and age determination, as well as investigations of petroglyphs (carvings into stone surfaces), stone artifacts and other artifactual rocks (building stone and sculptures) described in the literature, displayed in museum collections, and found in the field locally. {N} Credits: 4 
Bosiljka Glumac 
Offered Spring 2016 

ARC 135 Introduction to Archaeology 
Same as ANT 135. This course studies past cultures and societies through their material remains. Explores how archaeologists use different field methods, analytical techniques and theoretical approaches to investigate, reconstruct and learn from the past. Data from settlement surveys, site excavations and artifact analysis are used to address economic, social, political and ideological questions across time and space. This course is taught from an anthropological perspective, exploring key transitions in human prehistory, including the origins of food production, social inequality and state-level societies across the globe. Relevance of archaeological practice in modern political, economic and social contexts is explored. Limited to first-year students and sophomores. Enrollment limited to 30. {N}{S} Credits: 4 
Maxine Oland 
Offered Fall 2015 

ANT 220 Collecting the Past: Art and Artifacts of the Ancient Americas 
This course is not taught on the Smith College campus. Same as ANT 216 at Mount Holyoke College and ANT 220 at Amherst College. Early European explorers, modern travelers, collectors, curators and archaeologists have contributed to the development of ancient Latin American collections in museums across the globe. This course traces the history of these collecting practices and uses recent case studies to demonstrate how museums negotiate—successfully and unsuccessfull—the competing interests of scholars, donors, local communities and international law. Students learn how archaeologists study a variety of artifact types within museum collections and have the opportunity to conduct independent research projects using pre-Columbian pottery and textile collections from the Mead Museum at Amherst College. This course is taught at Mount Holyoke College in fall 2015 using artifacts from the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum (ANT 216).  This course is taught at Amherst College in spring 2017 (ANT 220). {S} Credits: 4 
Elizabeth Klarich 
Offered Spring 2017 

ANT 237 Native South Americans 
Archaeology and ethnography are combined to survey the history and cultures of indigenous South America, from the earliest settlements to contemporary communities. Topics include early migration, cultural classifications, pre-Hispanic sociopolitical patterns, native cosmologies and ecological adaptations, challenges to cultural survival and indigenous mobilizations. {N}{S} Credits: 4 
Donald Joralemon 
Offered Spring 2017 

ARH 216 The Art and Architecture of the Roman World 
From North Africa to Gaul, from the Pillars of Hercules (Straits of Gibraltar) to Asia Minor, the interrelationships of art and power in the visual culture of the ethnically diverse Roman empire, from the first century B.C.E. through the fourth century C.E., are the subject of study. We also examine works of art from later periods as well as literature and film that structure our perception of the Roman world. Group I {A}{H}Credits: 4 
Barbara Kellum 
Not Offered This Academic Year 

ARH 292 Collecting the Past: Art, Artifact and Ancient America 
Who collects ancient art? What makes antiquities worthy of display? This colloquium focuses on contemporary debates in the field of ancient American art history. Among the topics we consider: architectural restoration, the legalities and ethics of collecting, indigenous perspectives on the display and interpretation of antiquities, and technologies for representing the past. The course consists of wide-ranging weekly readings and discussion, giving special attention to the intersection of art history and museum exhibitions. Prerequisite: one 200-level course in art history, archaeology, museum studies or the culture/history of Latin America. Not open to first year students. Group I. Enrollment limited to 18. {A}{H} Credits: 4 
Dana Leibsohn 
Not Offered This Academic Year 

ARH 315 Studies in Roman Art (S) 
Topics course. 

At Home in Pompeii 
The houses of ancient Pompeii—with their juxtapositions of wall paintings, gardens and objects of display—serve as the focus for an analysis of domestic spaces and what they can reveal about family patterns and the theatrics of social interaction in everyday life in another time and place. {A}{H} Credits: 4 
Barbara Kellum 
Not Offered This Academic Year 

GEO 112 Archaeological Geology of Rock Art and Stone Artifacts 
Same as ARC 112. What makes a mineral or a rock particularly useful as a stone tool or attractive as a sculpture? Students in this course explore this and other questions by applying geological approaches and techniques in studying various examples or rock art and stone artifacts to learn more about human behavior, ecology and cultures in the past. This exploration across traditional boundaries between archaeology and earth science include background topics of mineral and rock formation, weathering processes and age determination, as well as investigations of petroglyphs (carvings into stone surfaces), stone artifacts and other artifactual rocks (building stone and sculptures) described in the literature, displayed in museum collections, and found in the field locally. {N} Credits: 4 
Bosiljka Glumac 
Offered Spring 2016 

HST 201 (L) The Silk Road and Premodern Eurasia 
The premodern contacts, imagined and real, between East and West. Cultural, religious and technological exchanges between China, India and Rome. The interactions between these sedentary societies and their nomadic neighbors. The rise and fall of nomadic empires such as that of the Mongols. Trade, exploration and conquest on the Eurasian continent. We sample pertinent travel accounts as a form of ethnographical knowledge that reproduces notions of cultural identity and civilization. {H} Credits: 4 
Richard Lim 
Offered Spring 2016 

HST 204 (L) The Roman Republic 
A survey of the developing social, cultural and political world of Rome as the city assumed dominance in the Mediterranean. Achievements of the Roman state, plebeians and patricians, the Roman family and slavery; encounters with local cultures in North Africa, Gaul and the Greek East; problems of imperial expansion and social conflicts.{H} Credits: 4 
Richard Lim 
Offered Fall 2016 

HST 205 (L) The Roman Empire 
A survey of the history and culture of the Roman Empire from the principate of Augustus to the rise of Christianity in the fourth century. The role of the emperor in the Roman world, Rome and its relationship with local cities, the maintenance of an imperial system; rich and poor, free and slave, Roman and barbarian; the family, law and society; military monarchy; persecution of Christians; pagans, Christians and Jews in late antiquity. {H} Credits: 4 
Richard Lim 
Offered Spring 2017 

REL 162 Introduction to the Bible I 
The Hebrew scriptures (Tanakh/Old Testament). A survey of the Hebrew Bible and its historical and cultural context. Critical reading and discussion of its narrative and legal components as well as an introduction to the prophetic corpus and selections from the wisdom literature. {H}{L} Credits: 4 
Joel Kaminsky 
Offered Fall 2015

 

 

 

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