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Smith students, faculty and alumnae gathered in Washington, D.C. for the inaugural colloquium of the Women in Public Service Project

 
For Transfer Students
 

FAQ


What are Smith's policies on standardized testing?

Will My Credits Transfer?

Where do transfer students live?

How diverse is Smith?

What's the social life like?

Where can I get career advice?

How does Smith consider applications from undocumented students?

How are students evaluated?

Can I defer my entrance to Smith?

How does Smith consider applications from transgender students?


What are Smith's policies on standardized testing?

SAT I or ACT scores are optional for U.S. citizens and U.S. permanent residents. The TOEFL or IELTS is required for international students being instructed in a language other than English.

We accept official scores that are listed on the high school transcript or sent from the testing agency. Scores listed on the Common Application are considered self-reported and will be reviewed by the admission committee.

Will My Credits Transfer?

With your letter of acceptance, you will receive a tentative credit evaluation which estimates your number of transferable credits, assuming that you have satisfactorily completed the program outlined in your application. The college determines the actual amount of credit only after evaluating your final transcript. Transfer students may make up any shortage of credit by taking an extra course during the academic year or, in some cases, by working in a summer program that has been approved in advance by the college. A student may not enter her senior year with a shortage of credit.

Advanced Placement credit may be used to make up a shortage of credits caused by failure or (with approval) to make up a credit shortage caused by dropping a course for health reasons or to undertake an accelerated course program. Smith College awards four credits for scores of 4 or 5 on most College Board Advanced Placement Examinations. Please see the catalogue for more detailed information about Advanced Placement credit.

Junior transfers should have decided on a major and completed some work in the field before coming to Smith, especially those intending biology or biochemistry as a major and those interested in premed. Students interested in engineering should consult a member of the admission staff regarding course requirements.

Courses approved for transfer count toward degree requirements; however, each department determines whether courses taken elsewhere will fulfill requirements in a student's major field. Students should save copies of course syllabi, papers and catalogue descriptions of courses to document the scope of courses taken elsewhere that they wish to include as part of a Smith major.

A maximum of 64 credits (two years' worth) may be transferred to Smith. No transfer credit is accepted for the following:

music performance courses (choir, orchestra, etc.) and certain physical education courses

CLEP

placement examinations administered by other institutions

grades below C

one semester or two quarters of an elementary language (credit will be granted retroactively, however, for completion of the full year of the language)

independent study, unless approved by the Smith department concerned (students must submit a detailed description of completed work)

certain introductory courses in mathematics;

courses not traditionally considered liberal arts (for example, business management, legal studies, nutrition, nursing)

computer science courses not involving problem solving or a language such as PASCAL (courses using BASIC or FORTRAN will not receive credit)

Where do transfer students live?

Smith is a residential college, and all students live on campus in 35 self-governing houses. Our residential houses range in style from 18th-century to contemporary architecture. Depending on house size, anywhere from 12 to 100 students, from first-years to seniors, call these houses home.

A room space in one of our houses is guaranteed for each entering transfer. Students may request nonresident status at the time of application only in very unusual circumstances, but the option of living off-campus is not normally granted.

How diverse is Smith?

Many colleges talk about the importance of diversity to a campus community, but Smith has gone beyond words, opening as many doors as possible to welcome a broad and diverse population of outstanding students. Bright young women from almost every racial, ethnic, political, social, economic, religious and cultural background, come to Smith to challenge themselves intellectually. The community at Smith includes more than 30 percent student of color population; of the total student body approximately 5 percent are African American, 9 percent Latina, 12 percent Asian-American/Pacific Islander and 1 percent Native American; 12 percent are international students and 5 percent are nontraditional students. Nearly 17 percent of students are the first in their families to attend college and the student body is socioeconomically diverse

What's the social life like?

We realize you're probably considering transferring to Smith because of its academic excellence. We also know that there will be times that you'll just want to have fun. At Smith, there'll be Sunday brunches, live concerts at John M. Greene Hall, dances, Friday afternoon teas at your house (come in your pajamas, if you want) and weekend parties.

Then factor in the Five College consortium, which gives Smith cooperative arrangements with four other schools in the area-Amherst, Hampshire and Mount Holyoke colleges and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Smith is only a fare-free bus ride away from these campuses where there are even more opportunities for additional classes, interesting lectures and the parties and events that are just for fun. Within a 12-mile radius of Smith, there are 30,000 other undergraduates, both male and female, for you to meet.

Where can I get career advice?

Most colleges will help you look for a first job, but Smith's award-winning Lazarus Center for Career Development Office will help you navigate a lifetime of changing career and personal goals. This is the place to turn for help in finding an internship, a summer job, a networking connection or career advice. The many services of the Lazarus Center are open to you from your first day here. Many transfer students have taken advantage of the thousands of internships available and arranged through the Lazarus Center, including the unique college-funded Praxis program. Praxis provides a student with a $2,400 stipend to cover the expenses of a 220-hour summer internship, linked to an academic component and supervised by a professional practitioner.

How does Smith consider applications from undocumented students?

An application from an undocumented student is treated no differently from other applications: every application Smith receives is considered on a case-by-case basis. Undocumented students apply to Smith as international citizens residing in the U.S. and follow the international admission and financial aid procedures. Financial aid for international students is highly competitive. Please be in touch with the Admission Office if you have further questions.

How are students evaluated?

We carefully consider your high school program, performance, experiences and potential for success at Smith. Most applications are read by two members of the admission staff and every part of your folder reveals another facet of your life. When we evaluate your transcript and read your recommendations, we look for evidence of success in a rigorous curriculum. Your essay tells us how you think and write and what you care about. Extracurricular activities give us a window on what you might contribute to our vibrant community. At Smith, we take a holistic and individual approach to each application. After all, we're choosing students, not statistical profiles.

Can I defer my entrance to Smith?

Admitted students wishing to defer their offer of admission should send a letter to Debra Shaver, Dean of Admission, or e-mail her through the admission office account. In your letter, please state the reasons why you wish to defer your admission and what your plans are for next year. Transfer students may defer their admission for a semester or a year. You must pay your enrollment deposit by the published deadline to hold your space in next year's class.

January Admission
Enrollment deadline - January 4
Defer Deadline - January 4

September Admission
Enrollment Deadline - May 1
Defer Deadline - June 1

How does Smith consider applications from transgender students?

An application from a transgender student is treated no differently from other applications: every application Smith receives is considered on a case-by-case basis. Like most women's colleges, Smith expects that, to be eligible for review, a student's application and supporting documentation (transcripts, recommendations, etc.) will reflect her identity as a woman. For more information go to Gender Identity and Expression.

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