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John Gibson, senior lecturer, art department, teaches a brief lesson on how we perceive differences among objects toward a strategy of recognizing commonalities.

 
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FAQ


Are SAT or ACT scores required?

Who can apply as an Ada Comstock Scholar?

What are the highlights of the admission process?

What kind of financial aid is available?

Where do Adas live?

What kinds of resources are available for Ada Comstock Scholars?

How do Ada Comstock scholars fit into the Smith community?

How diverse is Smith?

What are the most popular majors among Adas?

Where do Adas come from?

How can prospective Adas find out more about the Northampton area?

How does Smith consider applications from undocumented students?

How are students evaluated?

Will my credits transfer?

I have a bachelor's degree. Can I earn another undergraduate degree at Smith?

Can I defer my entrance to Smith?

How does Smith consider applications from transgender students?


Are SAT or ACT scores required?

SATs or ACTs are not required for applicants to the Ada Comstock Scholars Program.

Who can apply as an Ada Comstock Scholar?

In order to apply as an Ada, a woman must:
   be age 24 or older or
   be a veteran or
   have a dependent other than a spouse
   have a minimum of 48 transferable college credits in liberal arts courses. (50 is average for an admitted student.) For information about transfer credit, you can download a copy of "Credit Information for Ada Comstock Scholars"

What are the highlights of the admission process?

Normally, 150 students apply for 30 openings. Smith staff and faculty carefully review each folder with particular emphasis placed on the most recent college record, faculty references, the autobiographical essay and the personal interview. An interview is required and will be conducted on campus or, in some cases, on the phone.

Candidates are expected to present at least 48 liberal arts credits. On average, admitted students have about 50 transfer credits. The maximum number of transfer credits is 64 and students need a total of 128 credits to earn a Smith degree.

A woman who has attended Smith previously may re-enter as an Ada Comstock Scholar. She should contact the Office of the Registrar for information about readmission.

Following directions and planning carefully will help the application process go as smoothly as possible. Students may enter in September or January.

Admission decisions are mailed to students in December or March. Financial aid decisions and credit estimates are mailed with offers of admission.

What kind of financial aid is available?

Almost 90% of Ada Comstock Scholars were awarded financial aid, which includes grant, work study and loans. Two Phi Theta Kappa scholarships are awarded each year to Ada Comstock Scholars. We strongly encourage prospective Adas to research outside scholarships on www.fastweb.com.

An Ada Comstock Scholar's fees and grant are based on the number of credits for which she has enrolled and the housing option she chooses. Students on aid are required to enroll in at least 8 credits, normally two courses, each semester. Adas are considered full-time if enrolled in 12 credits or more. To be eligible for campus housing, students must be full-time.

Where do Adas live?

Over half of the Ada Comstock Scholars commute from home to campus or relocate to live in privately owned apartments in the Northampton area. The other half live in Smith student housing which includes dormitory rooms (21%), apartments and family housing (13%), cooperative housing (4%) and transient/commuter housing available for 1 to 4 nights a week.

What kinds of resources are available for Ada Comstock Scholars?

   Adas are invited to participate in all orientation activities and several events are offered specifically for Adas.
   The class dean of the Ada Comstock Scholars is dedicated to helping students negotiate the academic landscape at Smith. She works with faculty and students in the academic planning process.
   The Ada Comstock Scholars Center is located in the garden level of Hopkins House. Students (especially commuters) use it often to study, make lunch, take a nap, use the computer or just meet other Adas. Hopkins is equipped with a kitchen, bathroom, lockers, computer, TV, VCR and comfortable furniture.
   The Office of Disability Services is available for students with documented disabilities.
   Peer advisers, a group of current Ada Comstock Scholars, contact new students and help smooth their transition to life at Smith.

How do Ada Comstock scholars fit into the Smith community?

Ada Comstock Scholars attend the same classes as traditional undergraduates. Like other Smith students, Ada Comstock Scholars are members of the Student Government Association, and may participate in a full range of extracurricular activities. Since about half of the Ada Comstock Scholars live off campus, they have the challenge of juggling commuting, studying, families and jobs. Others, particularly those who live on or close to campus, participate more fully in college activities. The new Campus Center and the Ada Comstock Scholars Lounge provide warm and welcoming places to meet other students and faculty.

How diverse is Smith?

Many colleges talk about the importance of diversity to a campus community, but Smith has gone beyond words, opening as many doors as possible to welcome a broad and diverse population of outstanding students. Bright young women from almost every racial, ethnic, political, social, economic, religious and cultural background, come to Smith to challenge themselves intellectually. The community at Smith includes more than 30 percent student of color population; of the total student body approximately 5 percent are African American, 9 percent Latina, 12 percent Asian-American/Pacific Islander and 1 percent Native American; 12 percent are international students and 5 percent are nontraditional students. Nearly 17 percent of students are the first in their families to attend college and the student body is socioeconomically diverse

What are the most popular majors among Adas?

     Undecided/Undeclared
     American Studies
     Art
     Psychology
     Government
     Education
     English
     Anthropology

Where do Adas come from?

Currently, Adas are enrolled from 33 states and the District of Columbia: Alabama, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, New Jersey, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin. Foreign countries: Burma, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Japan, Romania and Trinidad.

How can prospective Adas find out more about the Northampton area?

Students have found www.noho.com and www.masslive.com useful for gathering information about Northampton and western Massachusetts. In addition, the local newspaper, the Daily Hampshire Gazette: www.gazettenet.com has apartments listed in the classifieds.

How does Smith consider applications from undocumented students?

An application from an undocumented student is treated no differently from other applications: every application Smith receives is considered on a case-by-case basis. Undocumented students apply to Smith as international citizens residing in the U.S. and follow the international admission and financial aid procedures. Financial aid for international students is highly competitive. Please be in touch with the Admission Office if you have further questions.

How are students evaluated?

We consider carefully your performance in liberal arts college level classes, your writing, critical thinking skills, life experiences and potential for success at Smith. Faculty members read Ada applications along with admission staff members. Each part of your folder reveals another facet of your life. When we evaluate your academic transcripts and review your faculty recommendations and mid-term evaluations, we look for evidence of success and potential for growth. Your personal statement illustrates how you think and write. Co-curricular activities including jobs, hobbies and family responsibilities give us a window on what you might contribute to our vibrant community. Your interview gives us a chance--up close and personal--to learn more about you beyond your paperwork. At Smith, we take a holistic and individual approach to each application. After all, we're choosing students, not statistical profiles.

Please keep in mind that we review completed applications only, so please be sure to submit all of your application credentials.

Will my credits transfer?

For information about transfer credit, you can download a copy of "Credit Information for Ada Comstock Scholars"

I have a bachelor's degree. Can I earn another undergraduate degree at Smith?

Women who have earned a bachelor's degree are not eligible for the Ada Comstock Scholars Program. Smith does not award second bachelor's degrees.

Can I defer my entrance to Smith?

Admitted students wishing to defer their offer of admission should send a letter to Debra Shaver, Dean of Admission, or e-mail her through the admission office account. In your letter, please state the reasons why you wish to defer your admission and what your plans are for next year. Ada Comstock Scholars may defer their admission for a semester or a year. You must pay your enrollment deposit by the published deadline to hold your space in next year's class.

January Admission
Enrollment deadline - January 5
Defer Deadline - January 5

September Admission
Enrollment Deadline - May 1
Defer Deadline - June 1

How does Smith consider applications from transgender students?

An application from a transgender student is treated no differently from other applications: every application Smith receives is considered on a case-by-case basis. Like most women's colleges, Smith expects that, to be eligible for review, a student's application and supporting documentation (transcripts, recommendations, etc.) will reflect her identity as a woman. For more information go to Gender Identity and Expression.

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